(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bulletin, Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, April, 1953"

BULLETIN 




I 



of the 



Mmueratu of tJHrahua 



' 









l 



■ 















■ 
■ 



Catalogue Issue 
1952-1953 

Announcements 
1953-1954 






Vol. XXXIX 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 
APRIL, 1953 






Entered as second-class matter April 1, 1924, at the Post Office at Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for 
mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized December 3, 1938. 



BULLETIN 



of the 

tMuereitij of tyirginia 




Catalogue Issue 
1 9 52-1 9 53 

Announcements 
1 953-1 954 

The WOMAN'S COLLEGE of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Published in January, April, June and October 



MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 

Member of 

National Commission on Accrediting 

Association of American Colleges 

American Association of University Women 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools 

Southern Association of Colleges for Women 

Cooperating Institution 

American School of Classical Studies 

Athens, Greece 

American Council on Education 

Association of Virginia Colleges 



"Hmntir 




vrntiti 



4 

km , 






























































± y O O 










JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M|T|W|T 


F|S 








, 


1 


21 3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


61 7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


61 7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9|10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13114 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


1314 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16)17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20|21 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2021 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


2324 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27128 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


2728 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


3031 










...... 


::::: 


29 


30 


31 


— 


...... 


ZZ 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 





..... 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


S 












1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 









1 


2 


3 


4 







.... 


... 







1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


31 



















































30 


31 


...... 









...... 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 






1 


2 


3 


41 5 











1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1112 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18119 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


2223 


24 


25126 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27|28|29|30...... 


«4— 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


301 





...... 


— 


— 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 








1 1 1-..-I 


— 1 



















•-•1 


...... 





— 













































































A VO^ 










JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T|W|T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M|T|W|T 


F|S 




.. 







...... 


1 


2 




1 


21 3 


4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 










1 


2 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


910 


11 


12 


13 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


1617 


18 


19 


20 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 




ZZ 






Z 


28 


29 


30 


31 











25 


26 


27 


28 


29 



30 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F 


vS 


S 


M 


T|W|T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M|T|W|T 


F|S 





. 


1 





..... 


1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2| 3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9|10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


1112 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16117 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


16 


17 


1819 


20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23124 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


23 


24 


2526 


27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 


30 








25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30|31 


29 


30 


31 










30 


31 


1 







— 



























_u 
















SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T|W 


T 


F|S 


S 


M 


T|W|T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T|W|T 


F|S 


S 


M|T|W|T 


F|S 








1 


2 


3 4 












1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 
i 


27 


28 


29|30 
! 





:: 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 





College Calendar 
1953-1 954 



Summer Session 1953 

Registration Monday, June 15 

Classes begin Tuesday, June 1 6 

Final examinations Thursday and Friday, August 6 and 7 

Session 1953-54 

First Semester 

Dormitories open Sunday, September 1 3 

Freshman Orientation Program 

begins 10:00 a. m., Monday, September 14 
Faculty meeting, Chandler Hall 

7:00 p .m., Monday, September 14 
Registration of new students 

including transfer students Tuesday, September 15 

Registration of upperclassmen Wednesday, September 16 

Classes begin Thursday, September 1 7 

Thanksgiving holidays, after classes Wednesday, November 25 

Class work resumed 8:30 a. m., Monday, November 30 

Christmas holidays begin after classes Friday, December 18 

*Class work resumed 8:30 a. m., Tuesday, January 5 

Mid-year examinations January 22-28 

Second Semester 

Classes begin Monday, February 1 

Spring holidays begin, after classes Thursday, April 15 

Class work resumed 8:30 a. m«, Wednesday, April 21 

Final Examinations May 21-28 

Class Day Saturday, May 29 

Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday, May 30 

Graduating Exercises Monday, May 3 1 

•During Christmas holidays dormitories and dining halls will be closed and will not 
reopen until Monday, January 4, 1954. Students are requested not to return to the 
college before that date. 



Table of Contents 



Introductory Page 

College Calendar ~ ~ — 6 

Correspondence and Visitors — 1 

Official Directory 

Rector and Visitors - ~ 1 1 

Officers of Administration and Assistants ..... 12 

Officers of Instruction — 14 

Alumnae Association 22 

The College 

General Information 

History of the College - 23 

Location and Environment - 24 

Historic Fredericksburg „ .*. 25 

Field Trips and Tours ~ — 28 

Accessibility and Transportation _ 29 

Climate „ 29 

Buildings and Accommodations - 29 

Residence Halls — 29 

Other Buildings 32 

Other Facilities „..„ 37 

Riding „ „ 37 

Lyceum Series _ 37 

Admission and Expenses 

Admission Requirements 39 

Directions for Admission 40 

Advanced Standing 41 

Fees and Expenses 

For Residents of Virginia , 42 

For Non-Residents of Virginia 42 

For Off-Campus Students „ 42 

For Part-Time Students „ 43 

Virginia Students Denned „ 43 

Application Fee 43 

Terms of Payment „„ _ 44 

Late Registration Fee 45 

Laboratory Fees 45 

Books and Supplies „ 45 

Fee for Use of Radio „. 45 

Academic Costumes 45 

Special Examination Fee 45 

Diploma Fee 45 

Credit 46 

Refund of Fees 46 

Withdrawal _ 46 

Rooming Regulations 

Room Furnishings M _ 47 

Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms 47 

Room Assignment 47 

Rooming Regulations „ 47 

Financial Assistance _ 

Scholarships, Loan Funds, Employment, and Awards 48 

Miscellaneous Information „ „ 53 

Guests „ _ _ _ _ 54 



Administration Page 

Organization 55 

Semester Plan 55 

Summer Session ....„ 55 

Three-Year Degree Program 55 

Summer School of Music 56 

Extension and Evening Classes 57 

Academic Regulations 57 

Classification of Students 57 

Student Load 58 

Change of Schedule or Courses 58 

Grading 58 

Scholarship Quality Points 59 

Honors Work 60 

The Dean's List 61 

Reports, Deficiencies, and Failures 61 

Scholastic Achievement Necessary to Remain in College 62 

Excuses, Absences, and Class Cuts 62 

Week-end Visits 64 

Student Teaching 64 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching 65 

Requirements for Graduation 65 

Placement Bureau 66 

Lectures 66 

Terminology 66 

Student Welfare „ 67 

Guidance and Supervision 68 

Government and Discipline 69 

Student Government Association 69 

The Honor System 70 

Health 70 

Religious Life 73 

College Y.W.C.A 74 

Denominational Groups 74 

Assembly and Convocation 74 

Social Life 74 

Dress 75 

Student Organizations and Activities 75 

College Theatre „ 76 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 77 

French House 78 

Spanish House 78 

Program of Studies 

Degrees Offered , 79 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 79 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 80 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 

Economics 80 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Health, 

Physical Education and Recreation 80 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Medical Technology 80 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Physical Therapy 81 

Major Program 81 

Other Courses Available 81 

Foreign Languages 82 

Modern Languages 8.3 

Interdepartmental Majors 83 



Page 
Program of Studies (Continued) 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology 84 

Cooperative Program in Physical Therapy _ 89 

Cooperative Program in Nursing 91 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education ~ 94 

Course Offerings 96 

Art _ - 96 

History and Appreciation of Art 97 

Practice of Art ~ 97 

Astronomy 99 

Biology _ 99 

Chemistry 100 

Dramatic Arts and Speech ~ ~ 102 

Economics and Business Administration „ ™ 103 

Education 106 

English 108 

French „ 110 

General Language „ 111 

Geography 112 

Geology 112 

German „ „ ~ 112 

Greek 113 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 114 

History 119 

Home Economics „ 121 

Italian „ 126 

Latin 127 

Mathematics 128 

Music „ 129 

Theory of Music ... 1 30 

History and Literature of Music - 130 

Instrumental Ensembles „ 131 

Choral Ensembles „ 1 3 1 

Applied Music ..... „ 131 

Philosophy „ M 132 

Physics 133 

Political Science 134 

Portuguese .. 135 

Psychology M „ 135 

Russian 137 

Sociology „ „ „ 138 

Spanish „ 139 

Degrees Conferred June 1952 ..... - „ « 141 

Register of Students 146 

Geographical Distribution of Students „ „ 175 



Correspondence and Visitors 

Communications relative to the administration and general 
policies of the college, inquiries relative to information regarding 
scholarships, loan funds, and self-help, and requests for catalogues 
and viewbooks should be addressed to the President of the Col- 
lege. 

Requests for information relative to admission to the freshman 
class and certificates of admission should be addressed to the 
Director of Admissions. 

Requests for credits and transcripts of records should be 
addressed to the Registrar. 

Inquiries relating to admission to advanced standing, to the 
academic work and progress of students in college, to courses of 
study, extension courses, and the Placement Bureau should be 
addressed to the Dean of the College. 

Remittances and correspondence relating to students' accounts, 
etc., should be addressed to the Bursar. Checks should be made 
payable to Mary Washington College of the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

Correspondence relative to social regulations and permissions 
pertaining thereto, room assignments, etc., should be addressed 
to the Dean of Women or Dean of Freshmen. 

Correspondence relating to the health of the students should 
be addressed to the Resident Physician. 

Visitors are welcome at the college and provision is made for 
guiding them through the buildings and grounds. 

The office of the Dean of Women, the office of the College 
Physician, and the Library are open over the week-end. All other 
offices are closed from one o'clock on Saturday until Monday 
morning. 



The Corporation of the University 



Legal Title: 
"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia" 

THE RECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY 
Barron F. Black 

THE VISITORS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

To February 28, 1956 

A. D. Barksdale Lynchburg 

Barron F. Black Norfolk 

Whitwell W. Coxe Roanoke 

Benjamin W. Mears Eastville 

Howard W. Smith Washington 

Frank Talbott Danville 

Lucille Wheeler Newport News 

To February 28, 1954 

Richard A. Carrington, Jr Lynchburg 

John M. Emmett Clifton Forge 

Thomas B. Gay Richmond 

John Segar Gravatt Blackstone 

Mrs. Herbert M. Smith Staunton 

Mrs. Ben Wailes Sweet Briar 

The State Superintendent of 

Public Instruction, ex officio Richmond 



Vincent Shea The Secretary of the Visitors 



Officers of Administration and Assistants 



Colgate W. Darden, Jr., B.A., M.A., LL.B., LL.D Chancellor 

Morgan Lafayette Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D., LL.D. 

President 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of College 

Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Women 

Ruth S. Wade, A.B., B.S. in L.S., M.A Dean of Freshmen 

Louis C. Guenther, A.B., M.A Registrar^ 

Warren G. Keith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Director of Admissions 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Bursar and Purchasing Agent 

Margaret Swander Russell, A.B., M.S Director of Student 

Personnel and Supervisor of Off-Campus Students 
Reynold Howe Brooks, A.B Director of Public Relations 

LIBRARY 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D Librarian 

Marguerite L. Carder, A.B., B.S. in L.S Reference Librarian 

Marian Reed Watts, A.B., B.S. in L.S Circulation Librarian 

Jane Pate Featherstun, B.A., M.A Serials and Acquisitions 

Librarian 

Margaret T. Weaver, B.A., M.A Cataloguer 

Anne Iltis Curator, Mendel Museum 

HEALTH SERVICE 

John B. Rose, M.D Resident Physician 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N ■:. Resident Nurse 

Rawie Thomas, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

Rose E. Curtis, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

FOOD SERVICE 

College Dining Halls 

Pal Robison Food Service Director 

Burnette Stevens Assistant Food Service Director 

George F. Franklin Assistant Food Service Director 

Margaret E. Burnette Supervisor of Waitresses 

TEA ROOM AND BOOK STORE 

Thomas J. Honaker. Manager 

Annie J. Brauer. Dietitian 



OFFICE PERSONNEL AND SECRETARIES 

Leon Ferneyhough Assistant Bursar 

Ann M. Dameron, A.B Secretary to the President 

Sarah H. Estes, B.A Secretary to the Dean 

Mary Krupnick Secretary to the Dean of Women 

Catherine T. Hostnik, B.S Secretary to the Director of 

Admissions 

Inez F. Matthews, B.S Chief Cerk, Office of the Bursar 

Helen Ross \. Secretary to the Bursar 

Mildred Brooks Doggett Catalogue Typist, Library 

Marian S. Holt Order Typist, Library 

Joyce A. Thomas Circulation Clerk, Library 

Shirley A. Hedrick Secretary to the Registrar 

Patricia J. Sullivan Clerk, Office of the Registrar 

Doris C. Jones Clerk, Office of the Bursar 

Emily King Avery, B.S Clerk, Office of the Bursar 

Frances M. Sinlock Clerk, Office of the Bursar 

HOSTESSES OF COLLEGE RESIDENCE HALLS 

Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Women, 

Virginia Hall 

Mrs. Hester Zella Jacobus Westmoreland Hall 

and Hamlet House 

Zoe Wells Carroll Black, B.A., A.M., Ph.D Trench Hill 

Jane Grier Bell, A.B., M.S Marye Hall 

Mrs. Helen T. Shackleford Cornell Hall 

Lucy Biscoe Mary Ball, Dolly Madison 

and Mary Custis Halls 

Mrs. Hugh B. Miller Betty Lewis Hall 

Mrs. Marjorie Witter McClelland Frances Willard Hall 

Evelyn Lorene Brignull, A.A., B.A., M.A Framar 

Marion Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Margaret Brent Hall 

Guenndolyn A. Beeler, A.A., B.S., M.A Home Management 

House 

Mrs. Seawright Wade, A.B., B.S. in L.S., M.A Spotswood 

Marguerite L. Carder, A.B., B.S. in L.S Anne Fairfax Hall 

Mrs. Frances Robins Hostess at Large 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Vincent Willetts Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Lefa Faulkner Director of Dormitories 



Officers of Instruction 



Colgate W. Darden, Jr., B.A., M.A., LL.B., LL.D Chancellor 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., LL.B., Columbia University; LL.D., College of 
William and Mary. 

Morgan L. Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D., LL.D President 

A.B., University of Richmond; A.M., University of Chicago; Ed.M., Ed.D., Har- 
vard University; Student, University of Berlin; LL.D., University of Richmond. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean and Professor of Education and Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Philip James Allen, A.B., B.D., M.A Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Ohio Northern University; B.D., Garrett Bible Institute; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Student, Iliff School of Theology. 

Guenndolyn A. Beeler, A.A., B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Home Economics 

A.A., Kansas City Junior College; B.S., Kansas State College; M.A., Columbia 
University; Graduate Student, Columbia University. 

Julien Binford Professor of Art 

Graduate, Art Institute of Chicago. Ryerson Fellowship for study in France. Virginia 
Muesum Senior Fellowship. Rosenwald Fellowship. Represented in permanent col- 
lections of Boston Museum of Fine Arts, University of Georgia, University of Ne- 
braska, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of the State of Washington, Virginia 
Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield Museum, New Britain Museum, Oberlin College, 
and others. 

Vladimir V. Brenner, O.A.D Professor of Russian and German 

State Gymnasium of Moscow; Officer of Academic Degree, Military Academy, Iver, 
Russia. 

Louis J. Cabrera, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Spanish and Italian 

A.B., University of Dubuque; M.A., University of Maine; Graduate Student, 
Columbia University, University of Perugia, Italy, University of Grenoble, France; 
Doctor of Letters and Philosophy, University of Madrid. 

Hobart C. Carter, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Josiah Henry Combs, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of French 

A.B., Transylvania University; M.A., Docteur de L'Universite de Paris. 

Oscar Haddon Darter, A.B., A.M., Ed.D Professor of History 

A.B., State Teachers College, Ada, Oklahoma; A.M., Columbia University; Gradu- 
ate Student, University of Michigan, and Peabody College; Travel and Study in 
Europe; Ed.D., George Washington University. 



Officers of Instruction 15 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University; Student, Lehigh 
University, University of Pennsylvania, and University of California. 

James Harvey Dodd, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and Business Administration 

A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College; A.M., Ph.D., George Peabody College; 
Student, Vanderbilt University and Northwestern University. 

Michael Erdelyi, Ph.D., Oec., Pub. D Professor of Psychology 

Master of Social Sciences, University of Budapest; Ph.D., University of Rostock; 
Oec. Pub. D., University of Budapest. 

Charles H. Frick, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., Iowa State College; Graduate Student, 
University of Washington and Duke University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Robert L. Hilldrup, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

A.B., Southwestern College; M.A., University of Virginia; Graduate Student, Johns 
Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Student, University of Virginia. 

Warren G. Keith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University. 

Almont Lindsey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

B.S., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Burney Lynch Parkinson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.S., Erskine College; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; Litt.D., Erskine 
College; Graduate Student, University of South Carolina, Columbia University 
and Harvard University. 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 

Librarian and Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., West Virignia University; B.S. in L.S., University of Illinois; Ph.B., 
University of Wisconsin. 

Claudia Moore Read, B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., New York Uni- 
versity; Special study, Wigman School, Berlin, Germany, and Humphrey-Weidman 
Studio. 

George Earlie Shankle, A.B., B.A., M.O., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

A.B., M.O., Union University; B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., Ph.D., George 
Peabody College. 



16 Mary Washington College 

Milton H. Stansbury, A.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of French and Spanish 

A.B., Brown University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago; The Sorbonne, Paris Institute de Estudios Historicos, Madrid; 
University of Mexico. 

Arthur Lawrence Vogelback, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

Ph.B., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Mildred McMurtry Bolling, A.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of French 

A.B., Colorado College; M.A., University of Missouri; Advanced Study, Paris; 
Graduate Student, University of Chicago and University of Colorado. 

James Henry Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B., A.M., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Dorothy Duggan, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., in Fine Arts, Peabody College; Travel and 
Study in Europe; Student, Art Students' League, New York City, and Penn- 
sylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 

Eva Taylor Eppes, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Music 

Graduate in Piano and Harmony, Southern College; Graduate, Cornell University 
Music Department; Voice, Jeane Trigg, Richmond, Helen Allen Hunt, Boston, 
Edouard Albion, Washington, D. C, Isador Luckstone, New York; B. S., Mary 
Washington College; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Ronald W. Faulkner, A.B., A.M Associate Professor of Music 

A.B., A.M., Colorado State College; Institute of Musical Art, New York City; Pupil 
of George Barrere. 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; Ed.D., George Washington University. 

Sallie B. Harrison, B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Henry Weldon Hewetson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., University of British Columbia; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

Ruth Elizabeth Leonard, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., University of 
North Carolina; Graduate Student, The Pennsylvania State College. 



Officers of Instruction 17 

*Clifton B. McIntosh, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Fred Earle Miller, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Economics and Business 

Administration 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education; Graduate Student, George 
Washington University. 

Frances Ramey Mooney, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Social Science 

B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., George Peabody College; Graduate Student, 
Clark University, Columbia University, George Washington University, University 
of Southern California, University of Chicago and University of California. 

Alan Stanley Pierce, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

J. Kenneth Roach, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Economics and Business Administration 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University; Student, Roanoke College, 
Cornell University. 

Emil R. Schnellock . Associate Professor of Art 

Student, Art Students' League unde 
Art Colony, New York. 

Helen H. Schultz, B.S., A.M. 



Student, Art Students' League under Robert Henri and George Luks; Woodstock 
Art Colony, New York. 



Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Special Student, University of Chicago, University of Tennessee, Howard College, 
University of Colorado; B.S., A.M., George Peabody College; Research Marine 
Biological Station, Woods Hole, Mass.; Graduate Study, George Washington Uni- 
versity. 

Catesby Willis Stewart, A.B., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Latin 

A.B., Westhampton College; Ed.M., Harvard University. 

Margery E. Arnold, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Zoe Wells Carroll Black, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Tennessee; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Alice S. Brandenburg, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Goucher College; A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 
*On leave first semester 1952-53. 



18 Mary Washington College 

Stanley Frederick Down Bulley, Mus.B., Mus.D. 

Assistant Professor of Music 

L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music, London, England; Mus.B., University of 
Toronto; A.R.C.O., Royal College of Organists, London, England; Royal School 
of Church Music, Canterbury, England; Mus.D., University of Toronto. 

Grover Preston Burns, A.B., M.S Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Marshall College; M.S., West Virginia University; Graduate Student, Duke 
University and University of Maryland. 

Luther Clyde Carter, Jr., B.A., B.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Carson- Newman College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Graduate Student, 
Yale University. 

Robert F. Caverlee, A.B., Th.B., Th.M., D.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biblical Literature 

A.B., University of Richmond, Th.B., Th.M., Southern Theological Seminary; 
D.D., University of Richmond. 

Gaetano Cecere Assistant Professor of Sculpture 

National Academician, Fellowship, American Academy in Rome. Three years of 
travel and study abroad. 

Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A Assistant Professor of Music 

Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; B.M., and Vilion Diploma, Ithaca 
Conseravtory of Music, Student of Cesar Thompson— Belgian virtuoso, W. Grant 
Egbert, and Jean Pulikowski of the Cincinnati Conservatory; M.A., Columbia 
University; Graduate Student, George Washington University and Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music. 

Herbert Lee Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Student, Washington and Lee; B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Benjamin W. Early, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Marion A. Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Tufts College; M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

William Wayne Griffith, A.B., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Harvard University; B.S. in L.S., Drexel 
Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A Assistant Professor of Piano 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; Graduate Student, Washington and Lee University; 
Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, Hans Barth, Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, 
and Harold Genther; Composition at the Music Institute under Roger Sessons 
and Ernst Krenek; Composer and soloist. 



Officers of Instruction 19 

Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S Assistant Professor of Health, 

Physical Education and Recreation 

A.B., Lynchburg College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Candidate, Ph.D. Degree, 
University of Wisconsin. 

Edwin Harvie Jones, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of French and Spanish 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; Diplome superieur d'Etudes francaises, University 
of Nancy, Nancy, France; M.A., Duke University; Graduate Student, University 
of Virginia. 

Walter Butler Kelly, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Pauline Grace King, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Art Institute of Chicago; M.A., Peabody College; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Mary Annette Klinesmith, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia; M.A., Ohio State 
University; Research, University of London. 

Kurt F. Leidecker, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., A.M., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Charmenz Shirley Lenhart, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English and Music 

B.A., Indiana State College; M.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Margaret Swander Russell, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Guidance and Counseling 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; Graduate Student, University of Pittsburgh; 
M.A., University ©f Wisconsin; Study, City of London Vacation School. 

Hubert C. Shull, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Bridgewater College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Women 

and Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Westhampton College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Myrick Sublette, A.B., LL.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Indiana State Teachers College; LL.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 



20 Mary Washington College 

Raiford E. Sumner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University; Student, University of North Carolina. 

Laura Bennett Voelkel, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Scholar, Amer- 
ican Academy at Rome, Italy. 

Ruth S. Wade, A.B., B.S. in L.S., M.A Dean of Freshmen 

and Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Piedmont College; B.S., in L.S. and M.A., Peabody College. 

Jane Grier Bell, A.B., M.S. 

Instructor in Health and Physical Education 

A.B., University of South Carolina; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Evelyn Lorene Brignull, A.A., B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Spanish 

A.A., Stephens College; B.A., M.A., University of Alabama; Graduate Student, 
National University of Mexico. 

Guy H. Brown, A.B Instructor in Education 

A.B., Roanoke College; Study, University of Virginia. 

Mildred Cates, B.S., M.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Albert G. Duke, A.B., M.A Instructor in Radio and Speech 

A.B., M.A., Syracuse University; Graduate Student, Cornell University and Ohio 
State University. 

Ruby Cook Harris, B.S., M.Ed Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.Ed., University of Virginia; Graduate Student, 
University of Maryland. 

Rosemary H. Herman, A.B., M.A Instructor in Spanish 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., University of 
North Carolina; Student, Duke School of Spanish Studies. 

* Josephine Wert Hubbell, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.A., Iowa State University. 

Albert R. Klein, B.A., M.A Instructor in Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Iowa; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Elena Krupenski Instructor in Ceramic Art 

Student, Academy of Art, St. Petersburg, Russia; Ceramic Art Studios, Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

William C. Pinschmidt, Jr., B.S., M.S Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., Ohio State University. 

* Absent on leave, session 1952-53. 



Officers of Instruction 21 

W. J. Pitman, B.S., M.S Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Murray State College; M.S., Ohio State University. 

Teresa Shelton, B.S., M.A Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 

Mark R. Sumner, A.B., M.A Instructor in Dramatic Arts 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N Instructor in Home Nursing 

Mary Washington College; Stuart Circle Hospital School of Nursing, Richmond; 
Student, School of Nursing, Columbia University. 

William Russell Walther Instructor in Riding 

Rebecca T. Woosley, A.B., B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Health and Physical Education 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; B.S., Mary Wash- 
ington College; M.S., Louisiana State University. 



Visiting Instructors in Applied Music 

Jean Slater Appel, A.B., M.A Instructor in Organ 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Columbia University; Study under Karl Walter, Vienna; 
Werner Dommes, Munich; Jean Langlais, Paris. A.A.G.O.-Ch.M., American Guild 
of Organists. 

Richard Bassett, B.M., M.M Instructor in Woodwinds 

B.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; M.M., Jordon College of Music. 

Anne F. Hamer, B.Mus., M.Mus., Instructor in Piano and 'Cello 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; Teacher's Degree, Washington College of Music; 
M.Mus., Catholic University. Piano study under Richard McClanahan, New York 
City, and Joseph Brinkman, Ann Arbor, Mich. 'Cello study with Hans Pick, Ann 
Arbor, Howard Mitchell, Washington, D. C, and Joseph Schuster, New York City. 

Carmen Parlante Instructor in Brass 

Graduate Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia; Study under Saul Caston; Trumpet 
soloist with Navy Band during war; Presently with National Symphony Orchestra. 

Vera Neely Ross, B.M Instructor in Voice 

B.M., University of Kansas; Fellowship, Juilliard Musical Foundation; Graduate 
School, New York; Pupil, Madame Choen-Rene, Walter Golde, and Oscar Seagle; 
soloist. 



22 Mary Washington College 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Mary Washington College has a large and active Alumnae 
Association with members scattered over the United States and in 
some foreign countries. Many of them have achieved distinction 
in the fields of Art, Music, Literature, Business, Social Work, and 
Education. 

The purpose of the organization is to stimulate good fellowship 
among the members and promote the welfare of the college and 
its alumnae by increasing the interest of its members in the col- 
lege and each other. 

Officers 

President Miss Lillie Turman 

Moravian Seminary, Green Pond 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Vice-President Miss Margaret Lambert 

5209 Bluestone Avenue, Larchmont 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Secretary Mrs. Margaret D. Copes 

Onley, Virginia 

Treasurer. Miss Belva Tune Dunn 

5308 Sylvan Road, Richmond, Virginia 

Historian Mrs. Eleanor B. Smith 

1715 N. Nelson Street, Arlington, Virginia 

Parliamentarian Mrs. Marjorie Cox 

4509 Forest Hill Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Faculty Advisor. Mrs. Ruby C. Harris 

913 Sylvania Avenue, Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Executive Secretary Mrs. Pauline G. Lamason 



General Information 



History of the College 

Mary Washington is the Woman's College of the University of 
Virginia and is an integral part of the University system. The 
coordination of Mary Washington College with the University of 
Virginia was the culmination of the long struggle of the women 
of Virginia for educational opportunities comparable to those 
provided by the State for men at the University at Charlottesville. 

The effort to secure co-education at the University or to have a 
coordinate college for women established began with a recom- 
mendation by the Reverend A. D. Mayo in 1891. In 1894, four 
hundred women petitioned the University for admission. In that 
same year, women were admitted to courses but not to classes. 
Very few women took advantage of this privilege. The campaign 
passed through at least three separate phases: first, to secure co- 
education at the University; second, to establish a co-ordinate 
college for women at the University; third, to establish a co- 
ordinate college for women away from the University. 

Over a period of fifty-three years, thirty-five bills were intro- 
duced in the General Assembly of Virginia. Upon the recommen- 
dation of a Commission appointed by the General Assembly in 
1928, the Legislature in 1932 passed a bill making this institution 
the Woman's College of the University. This bill was vetoed by 
the Governor because of the great depression at that time, and it 
was not until twelve years later that the co-ordination was actually 
carried out. 

It is obvious, therefore, that the history of this college is inter- 
woven and, to a large extent, contemporaneous with the long and 
bitter struggle by women for legislation giving the daughters of 
Virginia the opportunity to share in the privileges enjoyed by 
her sons since the University was established by Thomas Jeffer- 
son one hundred and thirty-four years ago. 

The name of the college— Mary Washington College of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia— has real historic significance and background 
combined with intimate local associations. It is located on a hill 



24 Mary Washington College 

overlooking the home and tomb of Mary Washington; the boy- 
hood home of her illustrious son, George Washington; and Ken- 
more, the home of her daughter, Betty Washington Lewis; and 
the college grounds were at one time a part of the estate of Betty 
Washington. No more appropriate name could have been given 
a woman's college, and it should serve as an inspiration to young 
womanhood and a standard of excellence for ages yet to come. 

The development of Mary Washington has been phenomenal 
especially during the last few years. It is the largest college for 
women in the State, has a national reputation, and draws its stu- 
dents from almost every state in the Union, the territories, and 
some foreign countries. One of its distinctions is that it is one of 
few state-supported liberal arts colleges for women in America. 

Location and Environment 

Mary Washington College is ideally located amidst the finest 
traditions of Old Virginia, almost in the shadow of the Nation's 
Capital, and accessible to the great centers of culture of the East. 
The spacious grounds, including the main campus and the his- 
toric Brompton estate, containing 381 acres, are situated on the 
famous Marye Heights, commanding a panoramic view of the 
City of Fredericksburg and the beautiful Rappahannock River 
Valley, and are adjacent to the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 
National Military Park. 

Here you may spend your college days where you can look 
down upon the boyhood home of George Washington; the home 
of his sister; the home and tomb of his mother; and within a 
short drive of Wakefield, his birthplace, and of Mount Vernon, 
the home of his mature years. 

The college is noted for the natural beauty of the grounds and 
impressive classical architecture. The position of the buildings 
gives them a commanding appearance, bringing out in strong 
relief the classic beauty of the architecture. In the rear of the 
campus, deep wooded ravines threaded by crystal streams add a 
picturesqueness to the grounds. 

The setting, campus, and buildings possess a singular charm 
and appeal. The stately colonial pillars, the rolling shady lawns, 
and the hallowed traditions which cluster about the place are 



Historic Fredericksburg 25 

vividly reminiscent of the gracious charm, culture, and romance 
of the Old South. The environment is both inspiring and roman- 
tic because of its colorful past and the peculiar blending of 
the life of early colonial days with the life of today. 

Historic Fredericksburg 

Fredericksburg and vicinity have played an important role in 
every critical and momentous period of American history from 
the time Captain John Smith and his intrepid followers sailed 
up the Rapahannock River in 1608 until the present, and is 
known as "America's Most Historic City." 

On the heights where Mary Washington College now stands, 
once stood "Seacobeck," an Indian village, visited by Captain 
Smith and his party. 

Fredericksburg furnished the Commander-in-Chief of the Army 
and the Admiral and Founder of the American Navy during the 
Revolutionary War, George Washington and John Paul Jones. In 
addition to the Commanders, it furnished six other Generals, 
Hugh Mercer, Thomas Posey, George Rogers Clark, William 
Woodford, George Weedon, and Gustavus B. Wallace. 

James Madison, President of the United States and Father of 
the Constitution, was born within twenty miles of the city. 
Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, wrote the "Act Establishing Religious Liberty in Virginia" 
in 1775, in Fredericksburg. This section of Virginia furnished the 
Presidents of the United States for thirty-two years during the 
most trying and difficult period of the history of the Republic. 
Fredericksburg was the home of James Monroe, President of the 
United States and author of the Monroe Doctrine. It was George 
Mason of an adjoining county who wrote the "Virginia Bill of 
Rights," and the "Constitution of Virginia." 

Here lived General Lewis Littlepage, protege of John Jay at 
the court of France, member of the Cabinet of the King of 
Poland, and emissary to Russia. His tomb is in Fredericksburg. 
Other notable characters who were born or lived in Fredericks- 
burg were John Forsythe, Governor of Louisiana, Minister to 
Spain, and Secretary of State; Governor Alexander Spotswood, 
distinguished colonial governor of Virginia; Chief Surgeon Lau- 



26 Mary Washington College 

rens Brooke, who sailed with John Paul Jones on the "Ranger" 
and the "Bon Homme Richard;" Moncure D. Conway, well- 
known author and divine; Commodore Theodore R. Rootes, 
Captain Joseph N. Barry, Commander George Minor, and Col- 
onel Richard D. Maury, all o£ whom distinguished themselves in 
the Confederate Navy; Captain Thorn, Commander of the 
famous Merrimac in the battle of Hampton Roads; Robert 
Brooke, Governor of Virginia and Attorney General; John Tay- 
lor, United States Senator from Virginia, writer, and world- 
famous agriculturist; and Gari Melchers, internationally known 
artist. 

Eminent scientists include Matthew F. Maury, the "Pathfinder 
of the Seas"; Captain Lynch, United States Navy, famous for his 
scientific work in connection with the topography of the "Dead 
Sea Valley"; Rear Admiral Griffin, Chief of Bureau of Naval 
Engineering and inventor of the electric drive and the turbine 
gear; and Tom Armat, who invented an important phase of the 
motion picture, and whose patent was later purchased by Edison. 

Among the notable women from Fredericksburg were Susan 
Metcalf Savage, early missionary to Africa; Ellen Lewis Herndon, 
wife of President Chester A. Arthur; Martha Stevens of Civil 
War fame; Mary Washington, mother of George Washington; 
Mary Custis, wife of General Robert E. Lee; and Kate Waller 
Barrett, internationally known sociologist and educator. 

Space does not permit mentioning all of the famous men and 
women who were born in Fredericksburg or whose lives were 
closely associated with the community. 

The following are some of the places in full view of the college 
visited by thousands of people from all over America and from 
foreign countries, every year: The boyhood home of George 
Washington, where he cut the cherry tree; the home and burial 
place of his mother; "Kenmore," the home of his sister, Betty 
Washington Lewis; "Chatham," long associated with romance 
and war, the headquarters of the commander of the Army of the 
Potomac, and the favorite visiting place of George Washington, 
where Count Zeppelin, an attache of the Northern Army, sent 
up a balloon at the Battle of Fredericksburg for observation 
purposes. 



Historic Fredericksburg 27 

Also, the first Apothecary Shop in America; the old slave block; 
the home of Matthew Fontaine Maury; the Rising Sun Tavern, 
built by Charles, the brother of George Washington; National 
Cemetery, where sleep not less than 15,000 Northern soldiers of 
the War Between the States who lost their lives on adjacent bat- 
tlefields; Confederate Cemetery where rest the remains of 5,000 
soldiers; "Brompton," now a part of the college grounds, head- 
quarters for the Confederates, and the center of the Federal attack 
in both the first and second battles of Fredericksburg; "Green- 
way," General Burnside's headquarters; Wallace Hill, where Lin- 
coln reviewed his troops; the law office of James Monroe, a 
shrine to the memory of James Monroe who served his country 
in more public offices than any American in the history of the 
United States, and where may be seen many of Monroe's personal 
possessions and other exhibits including the desk on which he 
signed the message to Congress which formed the basis for the 
famous "Monroe Doctrine;" historic Falmouth, the site of a 
prison camp during the Revolutionary War, and the home of the 
first millionaire in America. 

The old Sunken Road at the base of the heights in front of the 
college campus; the Confederate Cemetery at the foot of the hill; 
the breastworks and gun emplacements on the crest of the hill; 
and the cannon balls and other relics that are found from time to 
time, constitute mute but eloquent testimony of the two sangui- 
nary battles which were staged on the heights now occupied by 
the campus, during the War Between the States. 

The United States Government has established a Battlefield 
Park in the Fredericksburg area, and has spent large sums suit- 
ably marking its battlefields— Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spot- 
sylvania Court House, Salem Church, and Fredericksburg. 

Because of its historical significance, and the fact that it is 
situated in one of the most accessible and cultural communities 
in America, it would be difficult to find a more fitting place for a 
college or an environment more stimulating. Here the old and 
the new are happily blended into a progressive and interesting 
community of more than twelve thousand people, surrounded by 
historic shrines and crowned by a halo of golden memories cap- 
able of inspiring all who enter its gates. 



28 Mary Washington College 

Field Trips and Tours 

In an effort to utilize the rich historic environment in which 
this institution is located, and as an integral part of the program 
of instruction, the college sponsors regular visits or pilgrimages 
to the many local shrines and places of interest and note, includ- 
ing those in the immediate vicinity of Fredericksburg, the cities 
of Washington, D. C, Richmond, and other places accessible to 
the college. The heads of the various departments of instruction 
have charge of the tours with which each department is con- 
cerned. These trips are arranged for afternoons and Saturdays 
when they do not interfere with classroom work, and are usually 
made in the large air-conditioned bus owned by the college. The 
department head or teacher in charge of a group makes assign- 
ments in advance bearing on the particular places to be visited so 
that students will be familiar with the history or events connected 
with any given place. A lecture covering the history and signifi- 
cance of the particular place or shrine visited is given on the 
grounds. 

These trips are not confined to historic places alone, but in- 
clude visits to industrial and educational institutions as well as 
visits to Congress, State Legislature, Congressional Library, State 
Library, Museums and other governmental departments in Wash- 
ington and Richmond. 

Every student sometime during her stay at this institution has 
an opportunity of visiting all of the most outstanding and notable 
places to be found within a radius of fifty miles of Fredericks- 
burg. This phase of the program of studies is a rich education 
within itself, and furnishes students a background of information 
which not only enables them to appreciate our history and in- 
stitutions, but which serves also as an inspiration. Students 
eagerly look forward to these trips and they serve to vitalize and 
motivate the work in history, art, music, science, literature, and 
other departments of the college. 

The Mary Washington College bus made eighty-one trips from 
September, 1951, to June, 1952. The art students visited various 
galleries in Washington and Richmond; political science students 
attended sessions of Congress; science students visited the Mu- 
seum of Natural History, Washington Zoo, and industrial plants; 



V 



Accessibility and Transportation 29 

English students visited the Shakespeare Memorial Library; 
dance students went to Washington for the performance of 
Sadler's Wells Theatre Ballet; drama students attended plays 
in both Washington and Richmond; and many other classes were 
enriched by trips in connection with classroom work. 

During the 1951-52 session the college bus took groups of 
students to Constitution Hall in Washington to hear the Metro- 
politan Opera production of "Fledermaus"; the New York Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, with Dimitri Mitropolous conducting; 
Nelson Eddy, singer of stage, screen and radio; Ana Maria and 
her Spanish Ballet; the Trapp Family Singers; Joseph Szigeti, 
violinist; Rubinstein, pianist; and Jussi Bjoerling, Metropolitan 
tenor. The college bus took groups of students to the Celebrity 
Series in Richmond to hear the Metropolitan Opera production 
of "Fledermaus", the Metropolitan production of "Aida"; the 
Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Eugene 
Ormandy, the Singing Boys of Norway, Artur Rubinstein, and 
Patrice Munsel. 

Between semesters the college bus took a group of students to 
New York City for a sightseeing trip covering all the most 
famous sights of New York, for attendance at Metropolitan Opera 
performances, for visits to museums, and for visits to broadcasts, 
telecasts, and plays. 

Accessibility and Transportation 

The nearness of the college to the National Capital and the 
Capital of the State makes it practicable for students to take ad- 
vantage of the libraries, art galleries, theatres, and other educa- 
tional facilities in Washington and Richmond. 

Climate 

Fredericksburg enjoys a comparatively mild climate. The win- 
ters are short and seldom are the days that are too cold for out- 
door sports. 

Buildings and Accommodations 
Residence Halls 
All of the residence halls provide ample and comfortable hous- 
ing facilities. Every room is an outside room with ample ventila- 



30 Mary Washington College 

tion and light, single beds, built-in closets, and bookcases, and 
hot and cold water. The nine newer buildings afford every con- 
venience and comfort— apartments, suites, a limited number of 
single rooms, private baths, circulating ice water, beautifully 
appointed drawing rooms, comfortable lounge rooms, large 
porches and arcades, pressing rooms, kitchenettes, shower baths, 
incineration, etc. 

Westmoreland Hall. — Named for a neighoring county, the 
birthplace of George Washington, Robert E. Lee, James Monroe, 
and many other prominent men whose names are interwoven 
with American history. This is one of the newest dormitories on 
the campus. 

Mary Ball Hall. — Named in honor of Mary, the mother of 
George Washington. Her home and tomb, the home of her daugh- 
ter, and the boyhood home of her illustrious son are in Fred- 
ericksburg and in full view of the campus. 

Mary Custis Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of Robert E. 
Lee, whose home was at Chatham, in Fredericksburg. 

Dolly Madison Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of Presi- 
dent James Madison. The latter was born within twenty miles 
of Fredericksburg, and his life was closely associated with the 
community. 

Virginia Hall. — Named for the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
Frances Willard Hall. — Named in honor of Frances E. Wil- 
lard, the great temperance leader and Christian scholar. 

Betty Lewis Hall. — Named in honor of Betty, sister of George 
Washington, whose home, Kenmore, is in Fredericksburg and in 
full view of the campus. 

Cornell Hall. — Located on Cornell Street near the main en- 
trance to the campus. Accommodates approximately ninety stu- 
dents. 

Hamlet House. — Named in honor of William N. Hamlet, who 
was connected with the institution for thirty years. 



Buildings and Accommodations 31 

Marye Hall. — Built after the style of an old southern mansion 
on the most beautiful site on the campus. 

Margaret Brent Hall. — Named in honor of the first American 
woman to advocate political, social, and educational equality for 
women. In 1659 Margaret Brent received a deed for the land on 
which the city of Fredericksburg and Mary Washington College 
are now located. 

Framar. — Located on a beautifully landscaped acreage, front- 
ing on William Street, is one of the newer small residence halls 
for students. The building is of Georgian style. The drawing 
rooms are panelled in natural walnut. The facilities include an 
outdoor swimming pool, and dressing rooms, picnic grounds, 
and outdoor fireplace built of hand-tooled stone. 

Trench Hill. — This is a three-story building of Georgian type, 
located on Hanover Street opposite "Brompton." The grounds 
consist of approximately seven acres and occupy an eminence 
overlooking the City of Fredericksburg. 

Anne Fairfax. — A small residence hall, located on the central 
campus, named in memory of the wife of George Washington's 
half-brother, Lawrence Washington. 

Spotswood. — Named for Alexander Spotswood, colonial gover- 
nor of Virginia, founder of Fredericksburg, and citizen of Spot- 
sylvania County. 

New Dormitories. — The last State Legislature made appro- 
priations for a new dormitory group consisting of three units. 
This group of residence halls will house 363 students. An exten- 
sive study was made throughout the country to determine the 
latest and most adequate arrangement and facilities for dormi- 
tory units. Every room will contain either a connecting bath or 
private bath in keeping with all of the residence halls which 
have been constructed within the last twenty years on the Mary 
Washington campus. 

Home Management House. — A home adjoining the college 
grounds has been equipped to give seniors in home economics 
practice in every detail of housekeeping and home-making, in 



32 Mary Washington College 

purchasing provisions, planning, cooking, and serving meals, 
cleaning and caring for the house, and keeping accounts. This 
building is convenient to the post office, dining halls, and other 
main buildings of the college. 

Other Buildings 

George Washington Hall. — Administration building, named 
in honor of General George Washington, whose life was so closely 
associated with Fredericksburg and this immediate section of 
Virginia. 

It is one of the largest and most imposing structures on the 
campus, and contains the administrative offices; departmental 
offices; a few classrooms; music practice rooms; and one of the 
broadcasting studios which is fitted with the best in recording 
equipment, and is wired directly to the local studio so that pro- 
grams can be transmitted to state and national hook-ups. Other 
facilities include a speech clinic, large recreation room, and a 
roof garden. 

This building also contains an auditorium with a seating ca- 
pacity of 1624, dressing and make-up rooms, etc. The stage is fully 
equipped with the most modern devices for handling stage scen- 
ery and settings, and is planned to take care of the most elaborate 
programs. 

In addition, a fine pipe organ which is the generous gift of 
Senator Benjamin T. Pitts, of Fredericksburg, and a fully equip- 
ped projection room for the exhibition of motion pictures, are 
provided. 

E. Lee Trinkle Library. — This building is named in honor of 
the late E. Lee Trinkle, former Governor of Virginia and for 
many years President of the Governing Board of the college. 

The Library provides stacks and other facilities for 150,000 vol- 
umes, and contains five main reading rooms and five floors of all- 
metal stacks which house the general book collection. It also 
contains a few classrooms, the Mendel Museum, well-equipped 
offices, and workrooms. 

The paneled Browsing Room with comfortable chairs and 
lounges and a large fireplace, the Periodical Room, and the Vir- 
ginia Room combine to make this one of the most delightful 
places at the college for relaxation and reflection as well as study. 



Buildings and Accommodations 33 

In addition to the facilities of the splendid college library on 
the campus and the inter-library loan service, the Congressional 
Library and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, and 
the State Library and City Library in Richmond provide added 
opportunities for those interested in research. 

Monroe Hall. — Named in honor of President James Monroe, 
who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely identified 
with the community. This building contains classrooms; an as- 
sembly hall with a seating capacity of 632, equipped with pipe 
organ; a gymnasium; and a few departmental offices. 

Chandler Hall. — Science hall, named in memory of Algernon 
B. Chandler, Jr., who was President of the college from 1919 until 
his death in 1928. 

The first unit of this structure was erected in 1928-29. During 
1938-39 this building was completed, the first unit renovated, and 
the whole structure changed inside and out. The laboratories for 
home economics, dietetics, biology, bacteriology, chemistry, and 
physics are located in this building in addition to a number of 
lecture rooms and classrooms, student and faculty lounge rooms. 

Fine Arts Center. — The Fine Arts Center contains three sepa- 
rate buildings connected by colonnades and arcades, Jessie Ball 
duPont Hall, Gari Melchers Hall, and John Garland Pollard 
Hall. 

This is the most extensive group of buildings on the campus 
and provides ample facilities for all the fine arts. Completed in 
September, 1952, at a cost, including the equipment, of more 
than $1,150,000, it is one of the most beautiful and adequate 
group of buildings in the entire country. 

Jessie Ball duPont Hall. — The front central building of the 
group constituting the Fine Arts Center is named in honor of 
Mrs. Alfred I. duPont of Wilmington, Delaware, and Ditchley, 
Virginia, a native of the Old Dominion, in recognition of her 
interest and generosity to the College and the fact that she is the 
closest living relative of Mary Ball Washington for whom the 
College is named. 

This central unit of the group contains exhibit rooms, class- 
rooms, broadcasting studios, moving picture equipment, storage, 



34 Mary Washington College 

and the Little Theatre with a seating capacity of approximately 
300 and well appointed practice rooms, make-up rooms and 
scenery loft. 

Gari Melchers Hall. — The south building, named in honor of 
the late Gari Melchers, internationally-known artist, whose home, 
"Belmont," is located across the river from the college at Fal- 
mouth, is devoted entirely to the various phases of art, such as 
painting, sculpture, and ceramics, and contains classrooms, 
studios, kiln, offices, workrooms, and the like. 

John Garland Pollard Hall. — The north building, named in 
honor of the late John Garland Pollard, governor of Virginia, 
attorney-general, college professor, and patron of the arts, is de- 
voted exclusively to music. 

It contains sound proof studios for individual instruction, band 
practice room, choral and glee club practice room, records rooms, 
offices, et cetera. 

Seacobeck Hall. — This building is designed in the shape of a 
star, and is one of the most beautiful structures on the campus. 
It contains six dining rooms, with a seating capacity of approxi- 
mately 1700, lounge rooms, a model kitchen, and the most 
modern equipment, including bakery, ice plant, extensive cold 
storage, and general storage. 

Ann Carter Lee — Student Center. — This building, named in 
honor of the mother of Robert E. Lee, who was a descendant of 
the famous Robert "King" Carter of colonial days, was completed 
in the fall of 1952. The total cost, including the original unit 
which was built a few years ago, exceeds $750,000. This building 
provides offices for the major student organizations and publica- 
tions and an Alumnae Office. It also houses a modern indoor 
swimming pool, bowling alleys, large reception halls, two large 
lounge rooms, tea room known as the Terrace Room, book store, 
class rooms for physical education, a large front terrace at the 
main entrance and other facilities for student activities and rec- 
reation. 

Hugh Mercer Hall — Infirmary. — This building has just been 
completed at a cost of almost $300,000 and is centrally located on 
the College grounds. It is named in honor of Dr. Hugh Mercer, 



Buildings and Accommodations 35 

Brigadier-General in the Revolutionary War and an eminent 
physician of Fredericksburg. His patients included many of the 
early patriots and prominent citizens of Fredericksburg including 
Mary Washington and her eminent son, George Washington. 
This latest addition to the campus provides ample and modern 
facilities such as to be found in a first-class small hospital. Every 
room is provided with private bath or connecting bath. There 
are also isolation wards, solarium, sun deck, dining room, 
kitchen, doctor's and nurses' quarters, and a nurses' station and 
kitchenette on every floor. In addition, there are consultation 
offices, drug room, examining room, and all necessary facilities. 

Brompton. — Historic "Brompton" is the home of the President 
of the College. The estate is adjacent to the main campus, and 
contains 174 acres of land on which stands a colonial brick man- 
sion, the first unit of which is believed to have been erected about 
1730, and enlarged and completed in 1836 by Colonel John L. 
Marye. 

In a report by T. Sutton Jett and Ralph Happel, historians for 
the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, it 
is stated that "Brompton has both social history and military his- 
tory to make it significant." These writers further state that they 
believe "that no other house on the American continent is more 
important or better known in connection with military history, 
and few other homes are better examples of their type." 

The house is now approximately 225 years old. It served as the 
headquarters of General Robert E. Lee during the Battles of 
Fredericksburg and bears the scars of those two great battles. 
War-time pictures of Brompton show the havoc wrought by shot 
and shell in its walls. The shot holes and the results of cannon 
fire still are plainly visible in the walls of the main building, the 
servants' quarters, and other frame structures. Its foundations and 
eighteen-inch thick interior walls are made of handmade brick. 
It is a veritable treasure-trove of social and military history, and 
provides students and visitors with an important chapter in 
American history as it was enacted on the grounds, making that 
history more significant and vivid. 

The buildings, gardens, and military works have been restored 
to their original status and will be preserved for future genera- 



36 Mary Washington College 

tions. The college's nine-hole golf course is located on this prop- 
erty. 

Central Heating Plant. — A new central heating plant was 
completed in the fall of 1950 at a cost of $320,000. This provides 
ample service for the expanded building program, and its re- 
moval from the central portion of the campus greatly enhances 
the beauty of the grounds. 

Laundry and Storage Building. — This plant consists of a 
well-equipped steam laundry for the use of the students and the 
college. This building also houses the workshops and extra stor- 
age facilities. 

A large greenhouse, covering almost the entire top of this 
building, adds to the facilities of the Department of Biology 
and, in addition, furnishes flowers for the college. 

Amphitheatre. — Located on the natural slope of a hill in the 
midst of a dense grove of trees, the amphitheatre has a seating 
capacity of approximately 1,800, a large stage, dressing rooms, 
and a specially designed lighting system. 

Cabin. — A rustic camp, including cabin, with stone fireplace, 
electric lights, running water, and other conveniences, is situated 
on a high hill, in a remote section of the campus, overlooking 
the recreational grounds. 

Post Office 
The College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg Post Of- 
fice, located just across the street from the main campus, was 
established for the convenience of Mary Washington College. 
Similar service is provided here as is found at the main post office 
in the city. 

Mary Washington Hospital 
The Mary Washington Hospital Association has just com- 
pleted a new hospital near the college at a cost of $1,700,000. It 
is in charge of a large staff of specialists, and has the most mod- 
ern equipment. Here students may secure the services of widely 
recognized physicians and surgeons in cases of severe illnesses or 
emergencies. 



Lyceum Series 37 

College Recreational Center 

In the midst of the National Battlefield Park, not far away yet 
seemingly miles from the bustle of the city, is situated a large 
tract of wooded land filled with streams, ravines, wild flowers, 
and wild life. This tract is the gift of the late Professor and Mrs. 
W. N. Hamlet to the college, and serves as a memorial to both of 
them. 

This place will supplement the recreational facilities of the 
college, and serve as an arboretum, a wild flower preserve, and a 
game sanctuary. 

Other Facilities 

This is a delightful place in which to spend one's college days. 
The social and recreational opportunities and facilities are ex- 
ceptional—spacious campus, beautiful groves, two roof gardens, 
large recreation halls, one indoor and three outdoor swimming 
pools, picturesque nine-hole golf course on campus, amphithe- 
atre, sound motion pictures, tennis courts, gymnasium, athletic 
fields, saddle horses, rustic camp with cabin including all conven- 
iences, and farm within easy distance of the college on which 
cabins, a large recreational hall, and other facilities will be erect- 
ed. In addition, there are formal receptions and dinners, teas, 
formal and informal entertainment, tours, etc. A delightful home 
atmosphere adds to the contentment and happiness of the student 
body. 

Riding. — The college provides expert riding instruction and 
an ample number of saddle horses. The Oak Hill Riding Acad- 
emy, containing clubhouse, the riding ring, and stables, stands in 
a dense grove of trees near the campus. Extensive shaded bridle 
trails wind through a rolling countryside. 

The Riding Club sponsors four horseshows a year, three small 
shows and a large show in the spring. 

Lyceum Series 

The Lyceum Program for 1951-52 included the opera, "La 
Traviata," presented by the Charles L. Wagner Opera Com- 
pany; The National Symphony Orchestra; Kathryn and Paul 



38 Mary Washington College 

Schwartz, duo-pianists; Helen Masloff, soprano; the Frankel- 
Ryder Dance Group; Lee Fairfax, baritone. 

There were many prominent lecturers, including Dr. Susan 
B. Riley, President of the American Association of University 
Women; Karl Tunberg, President of the Screen Writers' Guild, 
of Hollywood, California; Admiral Irving Terrill Duke, Com- 
mandant, Naval Proving Ground at Dahlgren, and formerly 
captain of the battleship Missouri; Albert Deutsch, Sociologist; 
and the Honorable C. O 'Conor Goolrick, former member of the 
Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia, who delivered the 
Founder's Day Address. 

The Mary Washington Players presented Moss Hart's "Light 
Up the Sky," Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," 
and Percy and Denham's "Ladies in Retirement." 

Among the outstanding numbers scheduled by the college for 
the 1952-53 season are "The Mikado," presented by the Charles 
L. Wagner Opera Company; the National Symphony Orchestra; 
the Norfolk Symphony Orchestra; Erich Itor Kahn, pianist and 
composer; and others. 

The Mary Washington Players plan to present Noel Coward's 
"Blythe Spirit," Shakespeare's "King Lear," Ruth Gordon's 
"Years Ago," and G. B. Shaw's "Pygmalion." 



Admission and Expenses 

Admission 

For admission to Mary Washington College the general re- 
quirements are as follows: 
1. Scholastic Preparation.— 

(a) The general academic requirement for admission is that 
the applicant must be a graduate of an accredited* high 
school or preparatory school, and that she must have 
credit for at least fifteen entrance units.** 

Credit must be presented for at least three units in 
English and two units in Mathematics, which may in- 
clude general or basic mathematics but not arithmetic or 
business mathematics. The remaining units are electives, 
but credit cannot be given for more than four units in 
vocational subjects in the fifteen required for admission. 
A foreign language is not required but, if offered for 
credit, there must be at least two units in the same lan- 
guage. 

Standards of admission are flexible, but are such as to 
insure a high quality of scholarship. A careful analysis 
is made by the Committee on Admissions of the high 
school transcripts and certificates of all applicants for ad- 
mission, and each application is considered upon its in- 
dividual merits. Factors other than scholarship, such as 
personality, character, earnestness of purpose, and gen- 
eral background, are given due consideration. 

(b) Applicants who are not graduates of accredited high 
schools are required to pass a college entrance examina- 
tion. For admission by examination, the applicant 
should write to the Dean of the College and make pre- 
liminary arrangements for the examination before leav- 
ing home. 

(c) Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may 

be admitted as special students without satisfying the 

♦Schools which are accredited by any state or regional accrediting agency are accredited 
by the University. 

**An entrance unit represents a year's successful study of a subject in a high school 
or preparatory school, the class meeting five times a week. 



4° Mary Washington College 

usual entrance requirements, provided they give evi- 
dence of serious purpose and show adequate preparation 
for the courses they desire to enter. Special students are 
not permitted to become candidates for a degree until all 
admission requirements for the degree have been fully 
met. Entrance deficiencies may be met by summer school 
work, by private study and examination, or by taking 
beginning courses in college. Courses used for meeting 
entrance deficiencies cannot later be counted on a de- 
gree. 

2. Character, Personality and Interests.— A recommendation of 
character and personality by the school principal, including 
information about the student's interests, attitudes, and 
habits as a member of her school community, is required. 
Provision for this information is made on the reverse side of 
the certificate form. 

3. See Health, pages 70-73. 

Directions for Admission 

All high schools listed as accredited or approved by the state 
departments of education of their respective states are recog- 
nized by the college as accredited schools. A certificate from the 
principal of such a school, filled out on the form provided by this 
college, is accepted as sufficient evidence of the completion of the 
courses reported therein. 

Upon request to the Director of Admissions, an application for 
admission including the certificate referred to above will be sent. 

Pages one and two of this form should be filled in by the appli- 
cant and signed by the applicant and her parent or guardian. 
Pages three and four are to be filled in by the principal of the 
school from which the applicant has graduated or expects to 
graduate, and the completed form returned by the principal di- 
rectly to the Director of Admissions. Do not detach the principal's 
certificate. 

An application fee of $10.00 (read Application Fee page 43 
carefully) should be sent to the Director of Admissions by the 
applicant. No applicant will be considered for admission by the 
Committee on Admissions until the completed application for 



Admission 41 

admission, including the principal's certificate, and the applica- 
tion fee have been received. 

If the applicant is accepted for admission by the Committee on 
Admissions and living facilities are available, the application fee 
will be retained and the applicant will be notified of her accept- 
ance. 

If the applicant does not meet the entrance requirements, or if 
she does meet them but living accommodations are not available, 
the $10.00 fee will be returned. 

Since the total number of boarding students is limited by the 
physical capacity of the college, and hundreds of applicants are 
unable to secure dormitory accommodations each year, it is 
suggested that all papers in connection with admission require- 
ments be secured from the Director of Admissions, Mary Wash- 
ington College, preferably by April 1, and returned properly 
completed with remittance of $10.00 to cover application fee, at 
the earliest date possible. 

Advanced Standing 
A candidate for admission to advanced standing from an insti- 
tution of collegiate rank may receive credit for work completed 
there subject to the following conditions: 

1. She must present a certificate from the institution from which 
she comes showing her entrance credits at that institution; 
her college record, including grade of scholarship attained 
in each subject taken; and honorable dismissal. 

A student required to withdraw from another college on 
account of poor scholarship may not register here except with 
similar status and under like conditions imposed by the col- 
lege from which she was required to withdraw. 

2. She must spend at least two semesters in residence at Mary 
Washington College before receiving a degree. 

3. She must satisfy the entrance requirements of Mary Washing- 
ton College, using her advanced credits for this purpose if 
necessary. 

4. Credit is allowed only for work equivalent to courses in Mary 
Washington College. 



42 



Mary Washington College 



Credit for such courses is tentative, must be regarded as pro- 
visional at the time of the applicant's admission to college, 
and will not be considered as final, nor will the applicant be 
given final class rating until she has satisfactorily completed 
at least one semester's work at Mary Washington College. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Students Living in College Dormitories 
For a Semester 



Tuition fee 

General college fees 

Library fee 

Laundry charge 

Infirmary fee 

Student activity and miscellaneous fee 

Table board 

Furnished room 



$328.50 



. Virginians 


Non- 

VlRGINIANS 


None 


$140.00 


$ 85.00 


85.OO 


5.00 


5.00 


6.00 


6.00 


3.00 


3.OO 


9.00 


9.OO 


W-50 


!57-5o 


63.00 


63.00 



$468.50 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Students Not Living in College Dormitories 
For a Semester 



Tuition fee 

General college fees 

Library fee 

*Laundry charge 

^Infirmary fee 

Student activity and miscellaneous fee- 
Table board in college dining halls 
(optional) 

* Except students living in their own homes. 



WW 





Non- 


Virginians 


VlRGINIANS 


None 


$140.00 


85.00 


85.OO 


5.00 


5.00 


6.00 


6.00 


3.00 


3.OO 


9.00 


9.OO 



15750 



Fees and Expenses 43 

Part-Time Students 

Minimum charge (1 to 3 semester hours' credit) , $25.00. For 
each semester hour's credit above the minimum, $6.00. 

No student will be admitted on a part-time basis who registers 
for more than eight semester hours of credit. Part-time students 
are not entitled to the benefits of student activity functions, col- 
lege medical and nursing staff services, and other college services 
for which a fee is charged unless payment is made for the specific 
service at the regular rate. 

Virginia Students 
Any minor is classified as a Virginia student whose legal parent 
or guardian is a legal resident of the State of Virginia in accord- 
ance with the terms and conditions set forth in the constitution 
and the code of the Commonwealth of Virginia. (See Section 
1003L (a) of the Virginia Code.) 

Application Fee 
An application fee of $10.00 must accompany every application 
for admission. No application for admission will be acted upon 
by the Committee on Admissions until this fee has been received. 
If the application is not accepted this fee will be refunded with- 
out request. 

If a student whose application has been accepted cancels 
the application in writing before July 1, the fee will be re- 
funded, but it will be forfeited if she cancels after that date. 
If a student whose application has been accepted for the 
second semester cancels before January 3, the fee will be 
refunded, but it will be forfeited if she cancels after that 
date. If the applicant enrolls but withdraws before the end 
of the session, the fee is also forfeited. 

This application fee of $10.00 is a contingent fee required to be 
paid by every student regardless of whether she lives on or off the 
campus and is a deposit entirely separate from other fees and, 
since it must be retained until the end of the session as a guaran- 
tee of the proper care of college property, it cannot be deducted 
from fees due on entrance to the college. 



44 Mary Washington College 

Students will be held responsible for the care and preservation 
of college property and, as far as possible, all damage to buildings 
and equipment will be repaired at the expense of students caus- 
ing such damage. At the end of the session, the whole or such part 
of the application fee as may be due the student will be returned. 

Since dormitory accommodations and approved homes in the 
community are limited, making it necessary to deny admission to 
hundreds of applicants each year, it is advisable to comply with 
the requirements for admission (see Directions for Admission, 
page 40) , as far in advance of the opening of the session as is 
practicable. 

Terms of Payment 

All fees, room rent, and board are payable in advance by the 
semester. Fifty dollars ($50.00) must be paid on or before July 1. 
This is applied on the first semester's charges and will be refund- 
ed only in extreme cases if the applicant cancels her application 
after August 1. 

This does not include the application fee of $10.00 (see page 
43) which will be refunded if the applicant cancels her applica- 
tion before July 1. 

It is suggested that the balance of the first semester's charges be 
paid by September 10 or earlier, if possible, in order to avoid the 
rush that precedes registration. The most satisfactory procedure 
is to arrange payment by mail before entering the college. 

Students holding scholarships, working positions, or loan 
awards are required to pay all fees less the value of the scholar- 
ship, loan, etc., that they hold. 

Students will not be allowed to attend classes until their regis- 
tration cards have been approved by the Bursar's office, and 
such approval will be given only after satisfactory financial ar- 
rangements have been made. 

Failure to meet payments when due or make other satisfactory 
arrangements results in automatic suspension of the student from 
college until the account is brought up to date. 

Remittance should be made by certified check or post office 
money order payable to Mary Washington College, and sent to 
the Bursar. 



Fees and Expenses 45 

Off-Campus Students. — Of course, students living off-campus 
will pay all fees due the college each semester in advance, but will 
make their own financial arrangements in regard to living ex- 
penses with the hostess in the home in which they live. The col- 
lege does not attempt to collect rents, to stipulate prices, or as- 
sume any responsibility for financial arrangement for off-campus 
students. 

Late Registration Fee 

An extra fee of $3.00 is charged for late registration except in 
case of an emergency approved by the Registrar. 

Laboratory Fees 
The fees to be paid for laboratory courses are indicated in con- 
nection with description of these courses in another part of this 
catalogue. Laboratory fees cover the cost of materials and labora- 
tory service furnished, and are due at the time of registration. 

Books and Supplies 
Books and supplies are available at the College Book Store. 
These cannot be included in a student's college account but must 
be paid for in cash at the time of purchase. 

Fee for Use of Radio 
Radios may be used in dormitory rooms. However, their use 
is subject to avoidance of annoyance to others living in the 
dormitory. A charge of $2.00 a semester is made to cover the cost 
of operation. 

Academic Costumes 
Senior students are furnished an academic costume for use dur- 
ing their senior year at a cost of $5.00. 

Special Examination Fee 
A fee of $3.00 is charged for all special examinations except 
such as are necessitated by illness or other unavoidable causes. 
All such examinations must be completed during the semester 
immediately following the period for which the examination was 
scheduled. 

Diploma Fee 
At the time of taking a degree, a diploma fee of $7.50 is 
charged. 



46 Mary Washington College 

Credit 

No degree will be awarded, diploma granted, or transcript of 
credits furnished a student until all financial obligations to the 
college, other than student loans, have geen paid or secured by 
other financial arrangements. 

All previously incurred expenses at the college must be paid in 
full or secured before a student may re-enter at the beginning of 
any semester. 

Refund of Fees 

Students who withdraw from the college before the middle of a 
semester will be charged tuition, if applicable, and $50.00 general 
expenses. Board and lodging will be pro-rated for the actual time 
in residence. 

After the middle of a semester, no refund of fees will be made 
except in case of personal illness and upon recommendation of 
the College Physician. 

No refunds will be made to students whose connection with 
the college terminates on account of disciplinary action. 

Withdrawal 

Voluntary Withdrawal. — A student desiring to withdraw 
from college must have the consent of her parent or guardian if 
she is a minor and the approval of the President. When the Presi- 
dent is cognizant of the full situation and reasons for wishing to 
withdraw before actual withdrawal, frequently he is in position 
to make suggestions and recommendations which enable a student 
to remain in college. 

A student on "campus" who withdraws during this period ex- 
cept for imperative reasons approved by the college, will be re- 
corded as suspended for the remainder of the current session. 

Board will be refunded to students withdrawing from college 
temporarily only in case it is necessary to withdraw for a period of 
two weeks or longer on account of personal illness, evidenced by 
a certificate from the attending physician, or for a family emer- 
gency of which the President is informed and which he approves 
as an emergency. 



Rooming Regulations 47 

Enforced Withdrawal. — Students who are persistently neglect- 
ful of duty or who continuously fail to measure up to the scholas- 
tic or cultural standards of the college may be requested to with- 
draw or not to return to college. 

Rooming Regulations 

Room Furnishings. — The dormitory rooms are furnished with 
single beds, springs, mattresses, pillows, dressers, study tables, 
chairs, bookcases, and built-in closets. 

The student must furnish bed covering, four sheets, two pillow 
cases, towels, soap, and other articles desired such as student 
lamps, rugs, etc. It is suggested that curtains and decorative bed- 
spreads be selected after reaching the college since the selection 
should be based upon size of windows, color of walls and furnish- 
ings, and in consultation with roommates. 

Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms. — Each dormitory con- 
tains kitchenettes and well-equipped pressing rooms. Positively 
no cooking or use of electrical appliances is permitted in the 
dormitory rooms. Any student violating this rule will be asked 
to relinquish her room. 

Room Assignment. — Room assignments are made for fresh- 
men by the Dean of Freshmen and for other students by the 
Dean of Women, and requests for special room placements 
should be made to them. A reasonable period is allowed at the 
beginning of each semester during which adjustments, such as 
change of room or roommate, may be made with the consent and 
cooperation of the Dean of Women. This privilege is granted be- 
cause it is felt that students work most satisfactorily and are 
most contented where they have this opportunity. The right is 
reserved, however, to make adjustments whenever it is deemed 
advisable or necessary. 

Rooming Regulations. — Students, except those living at home 
and attending as day students, are required to occupy dormitory 
rooms as long as they are available. After the dormitories are 
filled, students may take rooms in approved private homes in 
Fredericksburg or in the community near the college. No student 



48 Mary Washington College 

may change her place of residence without permission from the 
Supervisor of Off-Campus Students, upon request of her parents 
or guardian. 

Many homes in the community are equipped to take care of 
students who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories. A list 
of approved homes is available and may be secured from the 
Supervisor of Off-Campus Students upon request. 

The administration reserves the right to change the boarding or 
rooming place of any student living off campus when the owner 
does not maintain the standard prescribed by the college; when 
the student is unwilling to cooperate cheerfully with the college 
management; or in case the student, without first registering with 
the Supervisor of Off-Campus Students, takes up residence off 
campus. 

All students not living in their own homes, whether room- 
ing in the dormitories or private homes, are alike subject to 
the regulations, control, and supervision of the college. 

Financial Assistance 

Scholarships, Loan Funds, Employment and Awards 

This college deems it a privilege to assist worthy young people 
in obtaining a coveted education. It stands ready to say to a limit- 
ed number of earnest students who are eligible for admission, and 
are not in a position to meet their entire expenses, that it can 
show them a way to obtain a college education. Through its 
friends and through successive legislative appropriations, loan 
funds to the extent of several thousand dollars each year have 
been accumulated and are available. Non-residents of Virginia are 
not eligible for loans from the State Loan Fund but are eligible 
for loans from funds derived from private sources. 

Eligibility and Tenure.— Scholarships and loans are limited,, 
and are awarded on the basis of need, character, and ability. Ap- 
plications for student employment, scholarships, and loans, 
should be made before July 1, and addressed to the President. 

Students receiving financial aid or holding employment schol- 
arships are required to maintain a high standard of scholarship. 



Financial Assistance 49 

a clear record in regard to discipline and, in cases of employment, 
render satisfactory service. 

Lalla Gresham Ball Scholarship Fund. — This scholarship 
fund was established by Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont in memory of her 
Mother, Lalla Gresham Ball. The fund provides aid for a limited 
number of students who are deemed to be especially worthy and 
deserving and who are residents of one of the following named 
counties of Virginia: King George, Westmoreland, Northumber- 
land, Richmond, Lancaster, Essex, and King and Queen. Each of 
said scholarships shall be $400 or more per year as the trustee of 
the fund deems advisable. These scholarships constitute a trust 
fund, therefore, the recipient of a scholarship, when she has com- 
pleted her education and has an earning capacity, is requested to 
pass the amount she has received on to some worthy and needy 
student who is eager for an education, in an effort to perpetuate 
the fund. Consideration will be given to scholarship, character, 
and need. 

The Chandler Scholarship. — Algernon B. Chandler, Presi- 
dent of the college from 1919 until his death in 1928, made a 
bequest of $1,000 to the college to be invested by the Treasurer, 
the proceeds to be used annually toward the education of some 
junior or senior student. This student is selected by the President, 
taking into consideration the following points: scholarship, per- 
sonality, attitude, and inability to continue college without help. 

Bayly-Tiffany Scholarship. — Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships are 
limited to students from the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Applica- 
tions for these scholarships should be made to the Chairman of 
the Scholarship Committee of the University of Virginia, Char- 
lottesville, Virginia. Old students must file their applications be- 
fore May 1, new students before July 1, preceding the session 
for which the scholarship is sought. 

The Frances Thompson Scholarship Fund. — This scholar- 
ship fund is provided in accordance with the terms set forth in 
the will of Frances Thompson. The recipient of the scholarship 
will be selected by the President of the College. Preference will be 
given to girls from Fredericksburg or Spotsylvania County. 



50 Mary Washington College 

Special State Scholarships for Teachers. — In order to in- 
crease the supply of qualified teaching personnel in Virginia, the 
General Assembly at its Special Session in 1947 authorized a num- 
ber of scholarships for residents of Virginia who would agree to 
teach in the public schools of the State upon graduation from col- 
lege. Students of Mary Washington College are eligible for these 
scholarships subject to the regulations established by the State 
Board of Education. Applications and copies of the regulations 
governing their award may be obtained from the office of the 
Dean of the College. 

State Loan Fund. — A student loan fund is made available to 
Virginians through appropriations by the State Legislature. Loans 
may be secured on proper recommendations as long as funds are 
available. Those desiring to borrow from this fund should make 
application to the President before July 1. 

Alpha Phi Sigma Loan Fund. — The Gamma Chapter of this 
honorary scholarship fraternity has established a loan fund of 
$100.00. Preference is given to members of the fraternity, though 
not limited to them. As the Chapter is able, additional units of 
$100.00 will be made available. This loan is awarded by the Presi- 
dent of the college and the administrative officers of the frater- 
nity. 

Bushnell Loan Fund. — This was established by the class of 
1950 in honor of Mrs. Nina Bushnell. Students eligible for this 
loan are to be seniors or juniors. 

The Alpha Tate Loan Fund. — The Alpha Tate Loan Fund 
given by the First District of the Virginia Federation of Women's 
Clubs in the amount of $500 provides two loans of $250 each. 
First consideration is given applicants from Roanoke City or the 
twenty southwest Virginia counties. Applications should be made 
to the President of the College or to Mrs. Vernoy Tate, Wise, 
Virginia. 

Y; W. C. A. Loan Fund. — The Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation of the college has established two loans of $100.00 each 
to be used by worthy seniors. These loans bear two per cent inter- 
est and are payable within one year after graduation, when the 



Financial Assistance 5 1 

money will be reloaned to other seniors, thus perpetuating the 
fund. These loans are awarded by the President of the college 
and the administrative officers of the Y. W. C. A. 

Faculty Men's Club Loan Fund.— The Faculty Mens Club 
has provided a loan fund of $100.00 available to any worthy stu- 
dent who may need financial assistance to help defray college ex- 
penses. The loan bears four per cent interest, and is payable not 
later than two years from date of loan. It is awarded by the 
President of the college. 

A. A. U. W. Scholarship. — This scholarship is presented 
by the Fredericksburg Branch of the American Association of 
University Women to a senior girl in one of the high schools 
in the Fredericksburg area, to be used during her freshman year 
at Mary Washington College. The recipient is selected by a 
committee from the Association in conference with the high school 
authorities. Personality and scholarship ability constitute the 
bases of the award. 

The Knights Templar Educational Foundation. — This loan 
fund was established by the Knights Templar Educational Foun- 
dation to aid worthy students, qualified as juniors or seniors, in 
need of a small sum of money to enable them to complete their 
education and graduate. Application may be made for a $600.00 
loan when one year is required and $400.00 per year when two 
scholastic years are required. Loans are to be repaid with 5 per 
cent interest over a four-year period. For further information and 
application forms write to Mr. George H. Keesee, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, 403 Law Building, Eighth and Main Streets, Richmond 19, 
Virginia. 

Virginia Division United Daughters of the Confederacy 
Loan Fund. — The Virginia Division United Daughters of the 
Confederacy has established the Nannie Seddon Barney loan 
fund, which is worth $150.00 annually to the holder. This loan 
fund is available to graduates of Virginia high schools. Such 
graduates to be eligible must be lineal descendants of Confederate 
soldiers. Applications should be made to Mrs. James B. Morgan, 
Chairman, Committee on Education, Virginia Division U. D. C, 
330 Robin Hood Road, Roanoke, Virginia. 



52 Mary Washington College 

Matthew Fontaine Maury Loan Fund. — The Matthew Fon- 
taine Maury loan fund was established by the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy of the State and is a memorial to Commodore 
Maury, who was born in Spotsylvania county within ten miles of 
Fredericksburg. The money is loaned on the personal note of the 
student receiving it, bears no interest, and is payable at the con- 
venience of the borrower. The applicant must be the lineal 
descendant of a Confederate veteran and a resident of the Fourth 
or Fifth Congressional District. The value of this scholarship is 
1 150.00 a year. Application should be made to Mrs. James B. 
Morgan, 330 Robin Hood Road, Roanoke, Virginia. 

Junior and Senior Loan Fund. — A loan fund of $200 was 
established by the class of 1948 for juniors and seniors with satis- 
factory scholarship standards. The loan bears interest at the rate 
of four per cent, and should be repaid within two years after the 
date of graduation. Applications should be made to the President 
of the College. 

Cook Loan Fund. — The Kappa Sigma Chapter of the Chi 
Beta Phi Honorary Sorority has established a scholarship fund 
in the amount of $300 in memory of Dr. Roy S. Cook, for many 
years a member of Mary Washington College faculty. This fund 
is operated as a loan. Applicants should apply to the President of 
the College. 

Dairy Council Scholarship. — The Dairy Council of Virginia 
is offering a scholarship of $100 for the session of 1953-54 to a 
sophomore from Virginia in the home economics department who 
is interested in nutrition. The award will be made on the basis 
of ability and need. Applications should be made to the President 
of the College. 

Student Employment. — In an effort to aid worthy students 
who are unable to finance their entire education, a limited num- 
ber of employment scholarships have been established, which 
amount to about one-third of a student's expenses for the session. 
These aid positions consist of light work in the dining rooms, 
library, laboratories, swimming pool, College Shoppe, and offices. 



MlSCELLAONEOUS INFORMATION 53 

Service Loving Cup. — Through the interest and generosity of 
the Fredericksburg Kiwanis Club, a silver loving cup is awarded 
each year to the senior who, in the judgment of the faculty, has 
contributed most to the promotion of the interests of the college 
during her stay here. 

The Thomas Jefferson Cup. — The Thomas Jefferson Cup is 
presented by the Alumnae Association each June to that member 
of the graduating class who, during her years at Mary Washing- 
ton College, not only has maintained a high scholastic average, 
signified by listings on the Dean's List, but has performed a most 
outstanding service for the college. The award was established to 
commemorate the consolidation of Mary Washington College 
with the University of Virginia. 

The Alumnae Daughters Cup. — This cup is awarded each fall 
by the Alumnae Association to the member of the Alumnae 
Daughters' Club who has made the highest scholastic average 
during the previous scholastic year. 

Alpha Psi Omega Award. — This award is made by the Eta 
Eta Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega to the outstanding senior drama 
major who has contributed the most to the College Theatre and 
the Dramatic Department. 

Miscellaneous Information 

Baggage. — Trunks are not permitted in students' rooms or 
corridors, but must be stored in a trunk room. 

Taxi. — Students who arrive by rail or bus can secure taxi 
service from the railway station to the college at a very small 
charge. 

Room Assignments. — Students upon arrival at the college 
should report to the Dean of Women, Virginia Hall, for room 
assignments. 

Registration. — Full instructions in regard to registration, as- 
signment of classes, etc., will be posted in the halls. Students will 
receive a printed schedule of classes upon matriculation. An extra 



54 Mary Washington College 

fee of $3.00 is charged for late registration except in case of an 
emergency approved by the Registrar. 

Guests. — Students entertaining guests in the college dining 
halls are charged seventy-five cents for breakfast, eighty-five cents 
for lunch, $1.00 for dinner on week days, $1.25 for midday dinner 
on Sunday and $1.00 for buffet supper on Sunday night. The 
crowded condition of the dormitories makes it inconvenient to 
have over-night guests. It is not best for guests or parents to 
request over-night entertainment in students' rooms therefore. 

Graduates or former students of the college are always welcome, 
and are not charged for meals or accommodations for a period 
not exceeding two days. Those who remain for a longer period 
may secure meals and room accommodation at the rate of $4.00 a 
day. Due to the very limited facilities available for guests in the 
dormitories, it is requested that the Dean of Women be notified 
in advance of a contemplated over-night visit to the college by an 
alumna. 



Administration 



Organization 

Semester Plan. — The College is organized on the semester 
plan, and students may enter at the beginning of either semester. 
(See College Calendar.) Students who enter the second semester 
in February are given a special orientation program to enable 
them to adjust readily to the College, and there are beginning 
sections of the basic courses. 

Summer Session. — The Summer Session is an integral part 
of the school year. The courses offered have the same credit and 
the same standard of work as those offered in the regular session. 
Classes are offered on Monday through Friday, with Saturdays 
free for recreation or field trips and tours to historical spots, 
museums, etc. 

THREE-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAM 

The work for a degree at Mary Washington College can be 
completed in three calendar years by attending three general 
sessions and three summer sessions. Classes meet twice as often 
in the summer as in the general session, and it is possible to 
complete a semester's work in each of three courses by attending 
the eight weeks' term. There is a vacation period of five weeks 
between the close of the summer session and the beginning of the 
fall semester. 

High school graduates who would normally enter college in 
September may begin with the summer session on June 15 and 
complete a substantial portion of the first semester's work before 
the fall term. Every advantage to entering college in September 
may be had by students matriculating in June, with many addi- 
tional advantages, including economy in time and money, since 
charges for the summer session are less than for the same period 
of time in the general session. A three-year degree program also 
enables young profesional women to enter a productive occupa- 
tion a whole year earlier. 



56 Mary Washington College 

Students who attend the summer session will be given first con- 
sideration in such matters as rooms, accommodations, and finan- 
cial assistance for the general session. 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

With the inauguration of its Summer School of Music, Mary 
Washington College makes available to both men and women 
the very finest in music instruction. Combining a distinguished 
artist faculty with a program stressing group activity as well as 
individual lessons, the highest standards of performance are con- 
stantly before the student as model and ultimate goal. Here the 
professional may receive advanced training, the amateur en- 
hance his musical enjoyment and understanding, the teacher 
renew his contact with ever changing methods and materials, the 
high school and college student— and the music student in gen- 
eral—pursue his technical and musical studies on his own particu- 
lar level but with the constant stimuli of encouraging assistance 
and inspiring example. 

Recognizing the importance of individual instruction, the Sum- 
mer School of Music sets equal importance on the ability to 
participate in group performance; thus chamber music and the 
orchestra have a leading place in the curriculum. The theoretical 
work has its own practical cast: the ability to hear as well as to 
write is the goal of these studies. The history of music is presented 
as a dramatization of the changes that have gone into its making. 

The Summer School of Music offers eight weeks of invigorating 
music study, music thinking, and music participation. The results 
of these manifold activities will be demonstrated in a series of 
public concerts, in which both the students and the faculty will 
take part. Great music, exciting and challenging, will here set its 
own standard for realization in performance, and its own incen- 
tive for study and practice, through constant exposure and con- 
tact. 

A copy of the special bulletin of the Summer School of Music 
will be sent upon request. Write to the Director of Admissions, 
Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, Freder- 
icksburg, Virginia. 



Extension and Evening Classes 57 

EXTENSION AND EVENING CLASSES 

Extension Classes. — In order that the college may be as useful 
as possible in its service to the public, extension courses are 
offered in cooperation with the University of Virginia Extension 
Division. This makes it possible for those who cannot pursue 
courses in residence at a college to remain at home and yet receive 
the benefits of college instruction. 

Extension classes are organized in any subject for which there 
is sufficient demand. These classes meet at some convenient place 
and at an hour that is agreeable to both instructor and students. 
In organization and procedure the work corresponds to regular 
recitations in the college. 

The location of the college makes it feasible to give extension 
courses in Fredericksburg, Culpeper, Orange, Gordonsville, Alex- 
andria, Bowling Green, Ashland, Arlington, Warsaw, Fairfax, 
Manassas, Tappahannock, Warrenton, and many other points in 
the immediate section served by this institution. 

Detailed information will be furnished upon request to the 
Dean of the College. 

Evening Classes. — Evening classes in subjects for which there 
is sufficient demand are available to residents of Fredericksburg 
and vicinity. These courses carry regular college credit. Graduates 
of accredited high schools are eligible to enroll. Information re- 
garding these courses may be obtained from the Office of the 
Dean or the Registrar. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen. Students with less than 28 semester hours of credit. 

Sophomores. Students with from 28 to 54 semester hours of 
credit. 

Juniors. Students with from 55 to 89 semester hours of credit. 

Seniors. Students with as much as 90 semester hours of 
credit. 



5 8 Mary Washington College 

Student Load 

Fifteen or sixteen hours a semester or thirty to thirty-two semes- 
ter hours for the session of nine months is considered a normal 
load. 

A student not in her first year of college may take as much as 
eighteen hours a semester if in the preceding session she has 
passed courses aggregating thirty semester hours with an average 
grade of "C" or better. 

Change of Schedule or Courses 

All schedules of work must be approved by the Registrar. After 
a schedule has been approved, the student is not permitted to 
drop any course or add a new course without permission. During 
the first week of the semester such requests should be made to the 
Registrar's Office. After the first week, permission must be obtain- 
ed from the Dean of the College. 

No credit is allowed for any course taken for which the student 
has not registered and which is not listed on the approved sched- 
ule card filed in the Registrar's Office. 

If a course is dropped after the first three weeks of a semester, a 
grade of "F" will be recorded unless the instructor certifies that 
the student was maintaining a passing grade at the time of the 
withdrawal. An exception to this rule may be made in case of 
protracted absence on account of illness. 

Students dropping a course without permission will automati- 
cally receive a grade of "F." 

A fee of fifty cents is charged for each change in courses after 
one week from the beginning of the semester. 

Laboratory or other special class fees are not refunded if the 
course is dropped more than one week after the beginning of 
the semester. 

Grading 

A student's class standing determines the final grade in any 
course. Class standing is based on the regularity of her attendance 
upon the lectures, laboratory, or similar exercises in connection 
with any given course, combined with the quality of her work 



Scholarship Quality Points 59 

as indicated by recitation grades, written tests, examinations, lab- 
oratory work, etc. 

Scholarship standing is indicated as follows: 

"A" is given for work of unusual excellence. 

"B" is given for work distinctly above the average. 

"C" denotes work of average or medium quality. 

"D" is the lowest passing mark and represents work of inferior 
quality. 

"E" denotes that the work has been unsatisfactory and that a 
condition has been incurred. When the condition is removed, a 
grade of "D" is recorded. Conditions not made up by the end 
of the session automatically become "F." 

"Inc." Incomplete. Incompletes not made up by the end of the 
following semester automatically become "F." 

"F" denotes failure and requires that the subject be taken 
again and passed before credit can be allowed. 

Scholarship Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must have earned as many quality 
points as semester hours' credit before being permitted to grad- 
uate. This means, in general, that the work of the student must 
be equal at least to an average grade of "C." Courses taken in 
fulfillment of the major program requirement must also average 
at least "C." 

The following Quality Point system is effective in this college. 
This does not apply to work transferred from other colleges and 
accepted by this institution for credit. 

This system is both objective and simple, and enables students 
to keep a constant check on their standing and to know at all 
times whether or not they are meeting the qualitative standard ate 
well as the quantitative standard of the college. 

For each semester hour of credit with a grade of "A" three 
quality points are allowed. 

For each semester hour of credit with a grade of "B" two qual- 
ity points are allowed. 

For each semester hour of credit with a grade of "C" one qual- 
ity point is allowed. 



60 Mary Washington College 

For each semester hour of credit with a grade of "D" or below, 
no quality point is allowed. 

For each semester hour of credit with a grade of "E" or "F" one 
quality point is deducted. When the course is subsequently re- 
peated or passed, this deduction is cancelled. 

In each case the number of semester hours' credit in each course 
is multiplied by the number of quality points assigned to the 
grade made in that course. For example, "A" in a course for 
which three semester hours' credit are allowed entitles the student 
to nine quality points. In this same course a grade of "B" would 
entitle the student to six quality points; "C" to three quality 
points; and no quality points would be allowed for "D." This 
means that a student falling below "C" on a course would have 
to make sufficiently high grades on other work to bring up her 
quality points to the desired standard or, if she fails to do this, 
she will be allowed to repeat a sufficient number of the courses 
on which she made "D" to bring her work up to the necessary 
level for graduation. 

Students entering from other colleges are required to make as 
many quality points here as additional hours of credit required 
for a degree. 

A permanent record of quality points as well as semester hours 
credit is kept in the Registrar's Office, and this information is 
available to students and parents at all times. 

Honors Work 

Students who have maintained an average of B-f- (2.5 quality 
point ratio) during five semesters and have shown ability in in- 
dependent study may apply for permission to do honors work in 
their major fields during the senior year. This work will take the 
place of six semester hours of course work and may be carried on 
in advanced seminars or under supervision of individual mem- 
bers of the faculty, according to the decision of the Committee 
on Honors of the department concerned. 

To make application for honors study, the student must re- 
ceive the approval of the Committee on Honors of the depart- 
ment in which she is majoring and must obtain permission of the 
Faculty Committee on Honors Work, to which she will submit a 



The Dean's List 61 

statement of her aims in the work which she wishes to under- 
take. Since this application must be completed not later than May 
1 of her junior year, the student planning to do honors work 
should consult her departmental adviser early in that year. 

Evidence of achievement in honors work will be shown by the 
presentation of a thesis or a similar project to the departmental 
Committee on Honors. Upon the approval of this committee, 
the Faculty Committee on Honors Work will recommend that the 
student be awarded a degree with honors. If the departmental 
committee does not regard the thesis or similar project as deserv- 
ing of honors recognition, the committee will determine the grade 
to be given. 

Final authority over organization, approval and judgment of 
study for honors is vested in the Faculty Committee on Honors 
Work. 

The Dean's List 

A student who makes an average of at least "B" on her work 
for any semester with no grade below "C" is placed on the Dean's 
List of Honor Students. 

Reports, Deficiencies and Failures 

A careful record is kept in the office of the Registrar of the 
entrance credits and work at this college of all students. 

Regular reports are mailed to parents at the end of each semes- 
ter. These include a record of the student's scholastic standing, 
with such other information as may be deemed important. 

In addition, parents and students are notified of unsatisfactory 
or deficient work about the middle of each semester. In this way, 
students are given every opportunity and encouragement to make 
up any deficiencies or probable failures before the end of the 
semester. Parents are requested to cooperate by discouraging 
week-end visits away from the college until such deficiencies are 
made up. 

This system has been in operation for several years and has 
reduced the percentage of failures materially. The college does 
not deem it fair to keep those who are doing unsatisfactory work 
in ignorance of their scholastic standing until the end of the 



62 Mary Washington College 

semester and then place them on probation, without first giving 
them an opportunity to make up the work. It has been demon- 
strated that a large percentage of failures is due to factors which 
can be controlled, and that the majority are not due to lack of 
innate ability but rather to contributing causes. 

Students with academic deficiencies are urged to consult fre- 
quently with the academic officials of the college and to make 
every effort to remove these deficiencies. In order to graduate it is 
necessary to maintain a general average of at least "C" and also 
an average of at least "C" on all the courses taken in the major 
subject. 

The Dean of the College, the Director of Personnel, and the 
Registrar are ready at all times to confer with students or parents 
regarding academic problems, especially in case of unsatisfactory 
progress. 

Scholastic Achievement Necessary to Remain in College 

Academic probation is a state of warning and indicates that 
the student's academic work is not satisfactory. A student will 
be placed on probation if she does not pass at least six hours of 
work while in her first semester in the College, and at least nine 
hours of work in each semester thereafter. 

A student on probation must carry at least eleven hours of 
work; after having incurred probation a student must pass in 
the succeeding semester at least eight hours of work with an 
average of "C" in order to continue in College. This regulation 
may be waived at the discretion of the Committee on Admissions. 

Excuses, Absences, and Class Cuts 

Excuses. — Excuses for boarding students on account of illness 
must be submitted by the College Physician directly to the Regis- 
trar's office. Excuses for illness of students living off campus must 
be submitted to the Registrar's office by the parent, hostess, or 
attending physician, stating the nature of the illness. 

Students must secure permission from the College Physician in 
advance when desiring to consult a physician or specialist off the 
the campus. 



Excuses, Absences, and Class Cuts 63 

No excuses will be accepted for absence from classes except for 
illness on the part of the students or an emergency in the home. 
In the latter case, the excuse should come from the parent, guard- 
ian, or attending physician to the Registrar's office, stating reason 
for absence. All excuses for absences must be submitted within 
three days after the absence has occurred. 

Under no circumstances are students excused from classes in 
order to leave college early before a holiday or the close of a ses- 
sion, nor will excuses be accepted for late returns after holidays. 
Students should consult the college calendar in making plane and 
train reservations. 

Of course, permission to be absent from the college will be 
granted upon request of parents or guardians. However, such 
absence does not relieve the student of responsibility for attend- 
ing classes, and is not counted as excused absence from classes ex- 
cept in case of illness or an emergency. Parents often do not real- 
ize how seriously they affect the college standing of their children 
by calling them home when there is no urgent necessity. It is 
most earnestly requested, therefore, that a parent or guardian not 
call a student away from the college except under most urgent 
circumstances. 

Absences. — Members of the faculty report to the Registrar's of- 
fice all absences. Unexcused absences are taken into consideration 
in making up the student's final grades. No student may receive 
credit for a course from which she has been absent more than 
one-fourth of the class meetings, whether excused or unexcused. 
Students are urged, therefore, to attend classes regularly, and not 
to jeopardize their class standing by absences. 

No student may receive credit for a course meeting three times 
a week from which she has been absent more than twelve times 
during the semester, whether excused or unexcused, or for a 
course meeting five times a week from which she has been absent 
more than twenty times during the semester. 

Seniors whose records for the preceding semester are such as to 
place them on the Dean's List are given responsibility for their 
own class attendance; however, college regulations concerning 
minimum class attendance necessary for credit must be met. 



64 Mary Washington College 

Class Cuts. — The system of class cuts is designed to cover all 
other absences from classes not covered under the head of "Ex- 
cuses." The number of cuts to which a student is entitled in any 
given semester is determined by her class standing in the previous 
semester. See Student Handbook for details in regard to excuses 
and class cuts. Any absence immediately preceding or succeeding 
a holiday counts as two class cuts. 

Week-End Visits 

Students are permitted to make week-end visits at such times as 
will not conflict with class schedules or college obligations; how- 
ever, they are requested not to make frequent and unnecessary 
visits away from the college. as this practice tends to interfere with 
their work. 

The privilege of week-end visits, including Sunday as a part of 
the week-end, is withdrawn at the parents' request from those 
who are failing or deficient in their work. 

Special written permission from the student's parents or guard- 
ian must be obtained in advance for visits away from the college 
other than to her home. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching is done in the public schools of the City of 
Fredericksburg and in other cooperating schools throughout the 
section of the State in which the college is located. The cooperat- 
ing schools serve as laboratories in which to develop the proper 
attitude, spirit, power, and skill. Most of the required subject 
matter and other necessary classroom requirements must be met 
before students are assigned to student teaching. 

The Fredericksburg High and Elementary Schools are housed 
in a large, modern, and well-equipped plant, located within a 
short walking distance of the college campus. In addition to class- 
rooms, the buildings contain an auditorium, gymnasium, cafe- 
teria, work rooms, laboratories, and an excellent library. The 
school grounds are provided with a stadium and ample play- 
ground facilities. 



Prerequisites for Student Teaching 65 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching 

Students are not permitted to do their student teaching unless 
they have an average grade of "C" or higher in the college class- 
room courses. Aptitude, temperament, and personality receive 
consideration, in addition to scholarship. The administration will 
decide in exceptional cases whether or not a student is to be ad- 
mitted to student teaching. 

No credit is allowed for student teaching on which the grade is 
below "C." 

No one who has an unremoved condition or failure on more 
than three semester hours of work will be permitted to do student 
teaching. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. An applicant for a degree must have credit for 126 semester 
hours of work and a minimum of 126 scholarship quality points. 
In other words, the number of quality points must equal or ex- 
ceed the number of semester hours earned. In computing the 
quality point average, only credits earned at Mary Washington 
College are considered. Courses taken elsewhere do not raise or 
lower the average at Mary Washington College. 

2. The number of quality points earned in courses in the 
subject in which the candidate is majoring must equal or exceed 
the number of credit hours in that subject. 

3. A student who fails to earn the requisite number of scholar- 
ship quality points by the time she completes the courses specified 
for a degree may take sufficient additional work to earn the re- 
quired number of scholarship quality points, but such courses 
must be approved by the Dean. 

4. A student who has transferred credits from another college 
must earn as many scholarship quality points at Mary Washing- 
ton College as there are additional hours of credit required for a 
degree. 

5. The responsibility for meeting the requirements for a de- 
gree rests on the student. 

6. A formal application for a degree must be filed in the Regis- 
trar's office by December 1 of the academic year in which the de- 
gree is to be conferred. 



66 Mary Washington College 

7. At least one year of residence (two semesters) in Mary 
Washington College is required for a degree, and the last semes- 
ter of a student's work must be done in residence at this college. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the credits for a degree may be 
taken in extension classes or by correspondence. Students should 
consult the Registrar before enrolling in a correspondence course. 

Placement Bureau 

The Placement Bureau offers an advisory and placement service 
to graduates and prospective graduates seeking employment. A 
folder of detailed information is compiled for each graduate and 
an effort is made to give as complete picture as possible of the 
candidate's qualifications. 

Business executives, personnel directors, school superinten- 
dents, and others interested in utilizing the services of graduates 
are invited to visit the college, consult the credentials compiled 
by the Bureau, and interview applicants. Confidential reports giv- 
ing a full and accurate estimate of each applicant will be furnish- 
ed on request. 

Students are urged to make full use of the advisory services 
of the Placement Bureau for consultation concerning graduate 
study, scholarships, and instructorships, as well as employment 
opportunities in various fields. 

The Bureau is under the direction of the Dean of the College. 

Lectures 

Members of the college faculty are available for lectures of a 
professional or popular character on subjects that may be desired 
by teachers gr by commercial or social clubs, and other organiza- 
tions, as well as for commencement addresses. Dates and other 
arrangements will be a matter of determination at the time. 

Terminology 

Semester Hours. — All credit toward graduation is calculated 
in semester hours. A semester hour represents one hour of class 
instruction (or two hours of laboratory work) a week for one 
semester, or approximately eighteen weeks. A college course that 



Student Life, Organizations and Activities 67 

meets three times a week for a semester carries three semester 
hours' credit. A course that meets three times weekly throughout 
the session (two semesters) carries six semester hours' credit. 

Required Course. — A course that every candidate for a degree 
must complete, regardless of the subject in which she plans to 
major. It is strongly recommended that all required courses be 
completed during the freshman and sophomore years. 

Major Program. — A field of concentration or specialization to 
which a student devotes a large proportion of her program of 
studies in the junior and senior years. 

Elective. — A course not required for a degree or for the major 
program which the student is following. 

Course. — A subject or portion of a subject as outlined in this 
bulletin for the session or for a semester. 

Quality Point. — A qualitative measure of the student's prog- 
ress toward a degree, awarded on the basis of the grade of scholar- 
ship attained .The number of quality points must equal or exceed 
the number of semester hours required for graduation. 

Unit. — A basis for evaluating high school work. A unit repre- 
sents a minimum of five 40-minute periods of class work a week 
for at least 36 weeks. 

STUDENT LIFE, ORGANIZATIONS AND 
ACTIVITIES 

Student Welfare 

Every effort is made to create a home-like atmosphere in the 
college. In living at close range, work and play must be happily 
proportioned. Friendliness and helpfulness characterize the spirit 
of the student body, while a regard for the rights of others and a 
consideration for the property of others is advocated consistently, 
thereby making of the college a pleasant and profitable home in 
which to live. 

All possible freedom of movement is allowed students, consist- 
ent with the academic and social standards of the college. Irregu- 



68 Mary Washington College 

larities which bring criticism or reproach upon the student or 
the college are not permitted. 

Students are expected to adhere to a high standard of conduct 
and not need to be reminded constantlly of detailed rules and 
regulations. Few formal or printed rules are, therefore, imposed 
upon them. The college authorities and members of the faculty 
rely upon students' sense of honor and strive always to appeal to 
their better selves. 

Guidance and Supervision 

The Dean of the College is general academic adviser to stu- 
dents, and they are urged to consult him regarding their class- 
room work, seelction of courses, and any academic problems. 

The Dean of Women is general adviser to students in matters 
pertaining to their social life, dormitory life, and general welfare. 
This applies to both resident and off-campus students not living 
in their own homes. 

The Dean of Freshmen is particularly concerned with the prob- 
lems of first-year students and works in cooperation with the 
Dean of Women. 

Students living in approved homes are under the direction of 
the Supervisor of Off-Campus students, who works in cooperation 
with the office of the Dean of Women. 

In addition, each of the residence halls is in immediate charge 
of a full-time hostess or counselor. These hostesses serve in the 
capacity of housemothers, and are under the general direction of 
the Dean of Women and the Dean of Freshmen. 

Furthermore, the Director of Student Personnel and the Ad- 
visory Council, composed of members of the faculty appointed by 
the President of the college, assist students in making physical, 
mental, moral, and social adjustments. Students are urged to con- 
sult the Director of Student Personnel and the Advisory Council 
upon any problems on which they desire advice or assistance. 

In addition, each member of the faculty is adviser to a small 
group of freshmen, and is ready at all times, and especially at the 
beginning of the session, to counsel and assist freshmen in every 
way possible. Students are given the names of their faculty ad- 
visers at the beginning of the session and are expected to report 
to them as early as possible. 



Government and Discipline 69 

Also, the heads of departments and other members of the fac- 
ulty are ready and anxious to confer with students in regard to 
courses, details of the curriculum they wish to pursue, failures, 
etc. It is suggested tha students confer regularly and frequently 
with their instructors in regard to their studies, and especially 
unsatisfactory classroom work. In this way the reasons for defi- 
ciencies or failures are frequently discovered and corrected. 

Government and Discipline 

All that pertains to the physical, mental, and moral well-being 
of students elicits the concern of the President and members of 
the staff, and the students are assured of wise counsel and friendly 
guidance. While exercising authority with freedom and firmness, 
compliance with rules and regulations is expected to be based 
upon a sense of right and appreciation of the necessity of a sys- 
tem and order rather than upon the fear of set penalties. 

The college reserves the right to request any students whose 
conduct or general attitude is considered unsatisfactory by the 
authorities of the college, to withdraw, even though no specific 
charge is made against her. 

Student Government Association. — The Student Govern- 
ment Association is composed of the entire student body. Its pur- 
pose is to promote personal responsibility, loyalty, and a high 
sense of honor in the individual student, and to represent and 
further the best interests of the student body and the college by 
inculcating the underlying principles of self-government and 
democracy. Its exclusive power is vested in a Student Council 
consisting of the four major officers of the Association, the resi- 
dence hall House-Presidents, the class representatives, and the off- 
campus representative. The Y. W. C. A. President, the Recreation 
Association President, and the Freshman Commission Advisor 
are ex officio members. 

Cases involving minor infractions of discipline are referred to 
and acted upon by the Student Council. The Student Council is 
under the advice, guidance, and supervision of the Joint Council. 
The latter is composed of four student representatives elected by 
the student body and three members of the faculty appointed by 
the President. Serious discipline problems involving violations of 



70 Mary Washington College 

college regulations outside the Honor Code are considered by the 
Joint Council. 

A handbook containing the necessary formal regulations is pre- 
sented to each student at the time of her matriculation, and she 
is acquainted with these rules in group meetings conducted by 
upperclass members of the campus organizations. 

The Honor System. — Mary Washington as the Woman's Col- 
lege of the University of Virginia inherited the unique and suc- 
cessful Honor System which has been in operation at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia for over a hundred years, and which has become 
a cherished tradition. Its administration is entirely in the hands 
of the students. 

The Honor System requires that a man or woman shall act 
honorably in all the relations and phases of student life. Lying, 
cheating, stealing, or breaking one's word of honor are considered 
infringements of the Honor System. The result in such cases will 
always be dishonorable dismissal from the college. The pledge in 
classes on quizzes, examinations, written problems, and exercises, 
means that the work which the student hands in to her professor 
is her own, which she herself has done in accordance with the re- 
quirements for the course as laid down by the professor. The 
pledge shall be as follows: "I hereby declare upon my word of 
honor that I have neither given nor received help on this work." 
The faculty will cooperate in establishing a clear understanding 
of these requirements. In any case of doubt as to the nature or 
extent of a pledge the student should immediately request that 
the professor in charge make the requirements perfectly clear to 
the entire class. 

Every student entering the college for the first time will be 
given a copy of the entire Code of the Honor System and soon 
thereafter will be expected to familiarize herself with its provis- 
ions and to sign a pledge stating that she understands what is 
expected of her and that she realizes that a plea of ignorance will 
not be accepted by the Honor Committee. 

Health 

Mary Washington College is vitally interested in the prevention 
of illness and the promotion of a high standard of health in its 



Health 7 1 

student body. As a result, the college enjoys a remarkable health 
record, and has had compaartively few cases of serious illness. 

The college maintains a close supervision over those conditions 
that affect student health in order that all cases of illness may be 
given immediate and expert care; that the incidence and spread 
of contagious diseases may be reduced to the lowest terms; and 
that the general working efficiency and living standards of the 
students may be maintained at the highest possible level. 

Each student before entrance to the college is required to 
present a letter or certificate from her family doctor stating 
that she has had a recent physical examination. Should this 
examination reveal information pertinent to the health and 
welfare of the student, it is requested that such information 
be included in the letter or certificate in order that the rec- 
ords in the college infirmary will be complete. It is often nec- 
essary to refer to the student's health record in order to properly 
advise her regarding certain courses of study ^specially physical 
education. Furthermore, all students are urged to obtain immuni- 
zation with tetanus toxoid during the summer before entrance. A 
clinic is conducted at the college later in the session at which time 
all students and members of the faculty and staff are expected to 
have chest X-rays, except those who can present certificates show- 
ing that they have had a chest X-ray within the past twelve 
months and the result. There is no charge for these X-rays. 

The medical fee for students living in college residence halls or 
those taking meals in the college dining halls covers the charges 
for services of the medical and nursing staff of the college and a 
maximum of fifteen (15) days in the college Infirmary during the 
session. Extra time in the infirmary will be charged for at the 
rate of $1.00 a day. 

The medical fee for students who do not take their meals in 
the college dining halls entitles them to office calls and treatment 
for slight illnesses or minor accidents at the Infirmary. In case of 
confinement to the Infirmary, there is an additional charge of 
$2.00 a day, payable on leaving the Infirmary, to cover meals. 

Specialists, Private Nursing, Etc. — The college does not as- 
sume responsibility for the cost of services of specialists or pri- 



72 Mary Washington College 

vate nurses, or for special prescriptions, operations, hospital fees, 
or epidemics, either for students residing in college residence 
halls or living off the campus. 

A daily report of illness is made to the President of the college 
and the Dean of Women by the Infirmary. In cases of severe ill- 
ness or accident, the parents or guardians are informed promptly. 

The Mary Washington Hospital Association has just completed 
a new hospital near the college at a cost of $1,700,000. It is in 
charge of a large staff of specialists, and has the most modern 
equipment. Here students may secure the services of widely recog- 
nized physicians and surgeons in case of severe illness or emer- 
gencies. 

Health Regulations. — 

1. Off-campus students living in their own homes who do not 
pay the medical fee are not entitled to the services of the 
Infirmary or College medical nursing staff. 

2. It is necessary to secure an excuse from the College Physician 
for any absence from class on account of illness. 

3. A student ill enough to be in bed is not allowed to remain in 
a dormitory, but must be in the Infirmary where she can have 
medical attention and care of the nurses. 

4. The hostess in charge of each dormitory or residence hall 
must report any cases of illness to the Infirmary promptly. 

5. Hostesses or the heads of homes in which off-campus students 
are living are required to report without delay to the Infirm- 
ary any cases of illness which may occur among the students 
in their homes. 

6. Students at home on account of illness are required to notify 
the College Physician immediately upon their return to col- 
lege. 

7. Students who have been exposed to any infectious disease 
must report to the College Physician before attending classes 
or mingling with other students. 

8. Students living in their homes or off-campus students who 
have been ill with infectious disease must report to the Col- 
lege Physician before resuming classes. 
9. Consulting physicians are called at the request of either the 



Religious Life 73 

student or her parents or guardian, but must be called by 
either the College Physician or nurse. 

Cooperative Health Program. — Every student is required to 
participate in some form of physical education which is in keep- 
ing with the condition and particular physical needs of the in- 
dividual. This training varies with individual needs and may in- 
clude corrective measures and modified exercise. Furthermore, 
special guidance may be provided, if necessary, for those suffering 
from physical defects or handicaps. 

The work of the Department of Health and Physical Education 
is coordinated and integrated with other departments of the col- 
lege, and especially with the work of the college physician, the 
infirmary, the Department of Dietetics, and the work in psychol- 
ogy and mental hygiene. No student is permitted to engage in 
any form of activity or exercise until it has been ascertained 
whether or not it is fitted to her physical condition and emotional 
reactions. 

A complete program of intra-mural activities is provided, in- 
cluding hockey, basketball, softball, tennis, swimming, golf, fenc- 
ing, dancing, archery, and equitation. 

Religious Life 

This institution is non-sectarian and, recognizing the religious 
freedom of the students, does not attempt to project into their 
lives the views of any one church. It does feel a deep responsibil- 
ity, however, for their religious welfare and endeavors to main- 
tain high moral and Christian standards. Assembly and chapel 
exercises are held regularly during the session, and ministers from 
the city are asked to take part in conducting these services from 
time to time. 

In addition, programs are contributed by members of the fac- 
ulty, prominent outside speakers, Student Government, Y.W.C.A., 
and other departments and organizations of the school. 

The churches in Fredericksburg represent practically every 
denomination and all extend a cordial welcome to the students. 
While church attendance is not compulsory, all students are en- 
couraged to affiliate themselves with some church during their 



74 Mary Washington College 

residence here. The spirit of cooperation between the college and 
the various local churches is one of mutual helpfulness. 

College Y. W. C. A. — The Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion holds daily vespers and a weekly devotional service to which 
members of the faculty and student body are invited. Standing as 
it does for the development of the body, mind, and spirit, the 
Association seeks to meet the various needs of the students, a large 
percentage of whom are members of this organization. Through 
various committees Freshmen are aided in adjusting themselves 
to a new environment, in making new friends ,and in discover- 
ing worthwhile programs in which to participate. The Y.W.C.A. 
sponsors an annual Religious Emphasis Week at which time a 
prominent church leader for lectures, discussion, and forums on 
problems confronting young people is invited to the campus. 

Denominational Groups. — A number of the denominations 
have formed clubs on the campus. In cooperation with the local 
churches these groups promote the welfare of their members 
through frequent meetings for discussion, devotions, or social 
activity. 

Assembly and Convocation. — Short assembly and chapel exer- 
cises are held on Tuesdays and Fridays and convocation on Wed- 
nesday evening. Students are required to attend these exercises, 
and members of the faculty are urged to attend. 

Social Life 

In order that students may receive a well-rounded education, it 
is necessary that there be offered opportunities for entertainment, 
recreation, and a general broadening of their intellectual life in 
addition to certain definite courses of instruction. 

The social calendar for the year is varied and includes formal 
receptions; formal dinners; teas; programs by the departments 
such as music, dramatics, physical education, etc.; lectures; mov- 
ing pictures; May Day festivities; alumnae banquets; informal 
inter-class parties; club parties; hikes; picnics; tennis, golf, swim- 
ming, and horseback riding. 

In addition, a program of entertainment consisting of Lyceum 
numbers, such as symphony orchestras, vocal and instrumental 



Student Organizations and Activities 75 

music, drama, etc., in which well-known artists appear, is provid- 
ed by the college without extra cost to students. 

Dress. — There are certain social occasions, such as the Lyceum 
numbers and formal receptions and dinners, when formal dress is 
not only in order but expected. It is, therefore, suggested that 
students include in their wardrobes one evening dress to meet the 
needs of these social functions. 

No attempt is made to set up a standard of dress, but students 
are expected to observe neatness, appropriateness, and good taste 
in personal appearance in the classrooms, dining rooms, on the 
campus, and on all occasions both formal and informal. This is 
stressed because of the present-day tendency on the part of some 
students to dress unconventionally in overalls and other costumes 
unbecoming the dignity of young women in college. 

Student Organizations and Activities 

The Recreation Association promotes wholesome activity and 
recreation among the students. It cooperates with campus organi- 
zations by maintaining the highest standards of college life and 
emphasizing the values of participation in intra-mural athletics. 
Membership is open to all students. 

The Glee Club, the College Choir, the Symphony Orchestra, 
the Dance Orchestra, and the Band are under the direction of 
the Music Department. The Symphony Orchestra is open to stu- 
dents with former experience with orchestra instruments and is 
composed of approximately fifty pieces of standard instrumenta- 
tion. The Band is composed of more than fifty experienced 
players, a drum major, four majorettes, and a color guard. 
It functions as a musical organization and as optional training 
for students taking courses in music. 

Students who have had or are taking a course in Play Produc- 
tion or who have demonstrated their dramatic ability are eligible 
for membership in "The Mary Washington Players." The club 
sponsors three three-act plays a year. Because of the proximity to 
Richmond and Washington, opportunity is afforded this group to 
witness some of the best professional theatrical productions. 

In the course of the year there are six formal dances. Four of 
these dances are open to the entire student body; the other two 



76 Mary Washington College 

are sponsored by the junior and senior classes. In addition to the 
formal dances, there are numerous informal dances throughout 
the session. 

There are three student publications: The Bullet, a periodical 
issued weekly; The Epaulet, a literary magazine published quar- 
terly; and The Battlefield, an annual publication. 

There are also a number of student organizations, departmental 
clubs, scholastic and honorary fraternities, and professional socie- 
ties, including Alpha Psi Omega, a national honorary dramatic 
fraternity; Mu Phi Epsilon, National Professional Music Sorority; 
Pi Gamma Mu, National Social Science Fraternity; Chi Beta Phi, 
National Scientific Fraternity; Alpha Phi Sigma, National Scho- 
lastic Fraternity; Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary English 
fraternity; a speech organization with membership open to all 
students; Sigma Tau Chi, with students majoring in commerce 
eligible for membership; Eta Sigma Phi, National Honorary 
Classics; Phi Sigma Iota, Honorary Group in Romance Langu- 
ages, Pi Nu Chi, Organization Promoting Interest in Pre-Nursing 
Curriculum; Zeta Phi Eta, Organization for Junior and Senior 
Dramatic Arts and Speech Majors; The International Relations 
Club organized under the auspices of the Carnegie Endowment 
for International Peace; Cap and Gown, a senior honor society; 
Modern Literature Club; The Athenaeum; Le Cercle Francais; 
Der Deutsche Studienkreis; Club Hispano-Americano; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; the Terrapin Club; the Matthew Fontaine Maury 
Science Club; the Art Club. The Recreation Association sponsors 
the Concert Dance Club; Junior Dance Club; Terrapin Club; 
Junior Swim Club; Hoof Prints Club; the Cavalry Troop; the 
Fencing Club; The Folk Dance Club; The Forum; and the Psy- 
chology Club. 

College Theatre 

The College Theatre is an integral part of the Department of 
Dramatic Arts and affords students the opportunity to appear be- 
fore the public in major productions of plays by the world's great 
authors, to gain practical experience in the various phases of 
theatrical production, and to achieve dramatic award through 
election to the Mary Washington Players and Alpha Psi Omega, 
national honorary dramatic fraternity. 



Radio Broadcasting Workshop 77 

All public programs or performances given at the college or 
anywhere else either by faculty or students must be approved 
by the Committee on Theatrical Standards. 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 

The importance of radio as an educational and socializing 
agency is generally recognized today. With the development of 
community broadcasting stations, opportunities in the field of 
radio have increased tremendously. 

Aside from the vocational aspects, there is a decided interest in 
the development of a radio "presence" on the part of educators, 
civic and club leaders and interested people in general. In fact, 
the wide use of radio for education, entertainment, and adver- 
tisement today makes a pleasing radio presence and voice highly 
important, and almost a vital necessity. Courses in public speak- 
ing alone are not sufficient for modern needs. 

In maintaining a radio broadcasting workshop, Mary Washing- 
ton College is endeavoring to meet the demand for a worthwhile 
service to that ever increasing number of young people and adults 
who are interested in radio either as a vocation or an avocation. 
Complete broadcasting studios and a control room with the most 
modern and complete equipment are located in both George 
Washington Hall and du Pont Hall. Programs of campus talent, 
selected recordings, and news are broadcast for two hours daily 
by "wired wireless" to the campus dormitory system over station 
WMWC, a member of the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System. 
There are direct wires to Station WFVA of the American Broad- 
casting Company, and the control room is also wired to the stage 
of the auditorium, to the roof garden, and to the ballroom in 
George Washington Hall. Opportunities are thus provided for 
audience reaction to the programs that are broadcast and for 
broadcasting experience of many different types. 

Studio conditions at the college are similar to those of a typical 
broadcasting station, so that every phase of radio work from con- 
trol room monitoring and operation to dramatic, speech, and 
musical work before the microphone is studied and experienced. 
The latest type of recording mechanisms enable the prospective 
speaker or artist to hear himself just as others hear him; and also 
to study in detail the effect of the program that has just been re- 



78 Mary Washington College 

hearsed. Special attention is given to the development of a pleas- 
ing and effective radio-speaking voice, as well as experience in 
many other types of radio work. 

Courses in radio broadcasting are offered by the Department of 
Dramatic Arts and Speech and are open to all students. 

French House 

The residents of the French House and their hostess speak 
French at all times. Every effort is made to give the students 
opportunities to speak French in different situations. Faculty 
members, native French students, and guests able to interpret 
French and French culture participate in frequent discussion 
groups and informal social events. Any interested student who 
has the equivalent of two years of college French and who plans 
to take some advanced courses in French may ask to become a 
house member. Students majoring in the language are given first 
consideration. 

Spanish House 

Framar, the Spanish House at Mary Washington College, is 
designed to give its residents the same opportunities for speaking 
Spanish that they would have were they living in a home in a 
Spanish speaking country. That is to say, they speak only Spanish 
in all situations and all relationships during their residence in 
the House. As varied experiences as possible are provided for the 
Spanish House dwellers in order that they may broaden their 
vocabularies and increase their fluency in the language. Picnics, 
swimming parties, kitchen snacks, conversations, study hours, 
house meetings, and vespers are all means of enriching the for- 
eign language abilities of the Spanish House members. Able 
speakers from the Pan American Union and other authorities on 
Spain and Spanish America are invited to give informal lectures 
to the group on the culture and traditions of Spanish peoples. 
Group participation in Spanish folk-songs and folk dancing is 
encouraged. Any interested student who has had the equivalent of 
two college years of Spanish and who plans to take some advanced 
courses in it is eligible to participate in these activities. House 
membership is open to students majoring in Spanish and others 
having the necessary proficiency in the language. 



Program of Studies 

Degrees Offered. — The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bache- 
lor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Bachelor 
of Science in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Bache- 
lor of Science in Medical Technology, and Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Therapy are offered. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. — One 

hundred and twenty-six semester hours of credit are required for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree, fifty-six of which must be distributed 
as follows: 

Semester 
Required Courses Hours 

English 12 

Foreign Language 1 2 

(Only 6 required if 4 units in one foreign language 
are offered for admission and a 200 course in that 
language is completed in college.) 

History 6 

(American History is required. It is recommended 
that History of Civilization be completed also.) 

Natural Science 8 

Mathematics or Fine Arts 6 

Political Science, Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology, or 

Economics 6 

Health and Physical Education 6 

Total credits in required courses 56 

Major program 36 

Electives 34 

(Sufficient credits to total 126 semester hours) 

Total required for degree 126 

Courses counted toward fulfilling any of the above required 
subjects for a degree cannot be counted also a part of the major 
program. A major program in English, for example, must include 
36 semester hours in that subject or in related fields specified by 



80 Mary Washington College 

the department, in addition to the 12 semester hours required of 
all students. 

Courses which already have been taken to fulfill a degree re- 
quirement in that subject may be applied to the major program 
if the degree requirements can be met in some other way. For 
example, a student who has completed 12 semester hours in 
French and decides to major in that field may take 12 credits in 
some other foreign language to fulfill the degree requirements 
and count the French courses numbered 200 or above as part 
of a major program in that field. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science. — The 

Bachelor of Science degree is available to students completing a 
major program in biology or chemistry. Requirements are exactly 
the same as those for the Bachelor of Arts degree with two 
exceptions: 

(1) A modern foreign language (preferably German or 
French) must be taken to satisfy the language requirement. 

(2) Instead of having a choice between mathematics or fine 
arts, the student must complete six semester hours in mathe- 
matics. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics. — The Bachelor of Science degree in Home 
Economics is awarded to students completing a major in this 
field. (See pp. 121-126.) The basic requirements are exactly the 
same as those for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. — The degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion is awarded to students completing a major in this field. 
(See pp. 114-118.) The basic requirements are exactly the same 
as those for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology. — The requirements for this degree are the 
same as those for the Bachelor of Science degree, the specialized 
courses outlined in the curriculum on pages 87 to 89 constituting 
the major program. 



Other Courses Available 81 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Therapy. — The requirements for this degree are also 
the same as those for the Bachelor of Science degree, the special- 
ized courses listed on pages 89 and 90 constituting the major pro- 
gram. 

Major Program. — The major program usually includes 24 
semester hours in the major subject and 12 semester hours in 
related subjects offered either in that department or in other 
departments. 

A major program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree may 
be chosen from any one of the following fields: 

Art English Music 



Biology 


French 


Philosophy 


Chemistry 


German 


Political Science 


Dramatic Arts and 


History 


Psychology 


Speech 


Latin 


Spanish 


Economics and Business 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


Administration 







Detailed statements of the requirements for a major program in 
each of the above fields are listed in the section of the catalogue 
entitled "Course Offerings" (pages 96-140.) There are also cer- 
tain interdepartmental major programs which draw their courses 
from closely related fields. For the specific schedules of subjects, 
see pages 84-86. 

Other Courses Available. — In addition to comprehensive 
majors in Biology and in Chemistry, elective courses in Astron- 
omy, Geology, and Physics are available in the program leading 
to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Courses meeting all requirements for entrance to the leading 
schools of medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, and medical 
technology are offered. Students are advised to consult the cata- 
logue of the advanced institution they plan to enter in selecting 
the prerequisite courses at Mary Washington College. 

Students majoring in Music will receive the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. By taking a major program in Music and also selecting 
the elective courses from this field, it is possible to obtain an 



82 Mary Washington College 

unusually thorough musical education. A rich offering of 
courses is available in the Department of Music. These courses 
may be taken also as electives by students majoring in other 
fields. 

A major program in Economics and Business Administration 
is also available. While essentially a liberal arts program, the 
major is designed to prepare women for positions of leadership in 
business, industry, and government, as well as for more capable 
management of their own financial affairs. Courses in shorthand, 
typewriting, and office practice are offered on a non-credit basis. 

Twelve semester hours in vocational subjects, such as Home 
Economics and Education, is the maximum number of credits 
allowed for all students except those who are majoring in Home 
Economics. 

Teaching. — While Mary Washington does not confer profes- 
sional degrees in Education, students majoring in the various 
academic fields who wish to qualify for the Collegiate Profes- 
sional Certificate may take the necessary courses as electives. This 
is the highest certificate for teachers issued by the Virginia State 
Board of Education. (See pages 106-108 for sequence of courses 
leading to the Collegiate Professional Certificate.) 

Foreign Languages. — Major programs are offered in French, 
German, Latin, and Spanish. Requirements for these major pro- 
grams are listed with the course offerings, but students should 
consult members of the department before choosing courses in 
related fields. 

Students who choose a major program in a foreign language 
are required to participate actively in the work of the depart- 
mental club promoting the use of that language. 

In addition to the major programs in Latin, French, Spanish, 
and German, sequences of elective courses in Greek, Italian, 
Portuguese, and Russian are also offered. Any of these languages 
may be selected in meeting the foreign language requirements for 
a degree. 

No credit is given for less than one full year of any foreign lan- 
guage. 



Modern Languages 83 

Credit for one year in a foreign language will be allowed only 
if it is offered in addition to two years in some other foreign lan- 
guage. 

Students who present entrance credit for two units in a foreign 
language cannot receive credit for a beginning college course in 
that language. 

Sequence of courses and prerequisite requirements must be 
strictly followed if credit is expected. 

Modern Languages. — Beginning and intermediate courses in 
any of the modern foreign languages are conducted in that lan- 
guage to an extent justified by the progress of the class, but 
advanced courses are conducted solely in that language. 

Students who have studied a modern foreign language in high 
school or in another college must take a standard placement test 
to determine the extent of their preparation for advanced work 
in that language. 

Students whose native tongue is not English and those who 
have a speaking knowledge of a foreign language will receive 
credit for only advanced courses in the language which they are 
already able to speak. Such advanced courses are numbered 300 
or higher. 

Interdepartmental Majors. — Interdepartmental majors are of- 
fered in three fields: (1) the Pre-Medical Sciences; (2) American 
Ideals and Institutions; and (3) the Early Humanities. These 
comprehensive majors offer an opportunity for a broader prepara- 
tion in certain areas of study than that afforded by the existing 
departmental majors. 

Students who select an interpartmental major are not re- 
quired to complete the customary departmental major, but they 
must fulfill all other requirements for a degree, including twelve 
seemster hours of English, twelve of foreign language, etc. (See 
page 79 for listing of required courses.) 

Since the curriculum for each interdepartmental major is or- 
ganized in some detail, students should plan their programs of 
study rather carefully in consultation with the adviser listed for 
the field or the dean of the college. 



84 Mary Washington College 

Pre-Medical Sciences 
Adviser: Dr. William A. Castle 
The interdepartmental major in the pre-medical sciences is de- 
signed as an undergraduate program for students planning to 
enter schools of medicine, dentistry, and medical technology. It 
provides a broader basis for further scientific study than the 
majors in biology or chemistry, but it does not replace majors in 
these fields. The general requirements are exactly the same as 
those for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, with 
these exceptions: 

(1) French or German must be taken to satisfy the language 
requirement. 

(2) Mathematics must be taken to satisfy the mathematics or 
fine arts requirement. 

(3) Psychology must be taken to satisfy the social science 
requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn thirty-six credits 
in pre-medical courses. Thirty-two of the required credits must 
be: 

Chemistry 311-2, Organic Chemistry 8 credits 

Chemistry 201, Qualitative Analysis 4 credits 

Chemistry 331, Quantitative Analysis 4 credits 

Physics 201-2, General Physics 8 credits 

Biology 221-2, Vert. Zoology and Comparative 
Anatomy 8 credits 

Four additional credits are to be taken in courses selected from 
the following: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Psychology 

The above program meets the course requirements for admis- 
sion to practically all of the medical schools, including the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. However, students are advised to consult the 
catalogue of the school which they wish to enter for detailed 
listings of requirements. 



American Ideals and Institutions 85 

The program also meets the course requirements for entrance 
to approved schools for medical and clinical laboratory techni- 
cians. Recommended electives are bacteriology, embryology, para- 
sitology, and other advanced courses in biology. 

American Ideals and Institutions 
Adviser: Dr. Robert L. Hilldrup 
The interdepartmental major in American ideals and institu- 
tions emphasizes courses in American art, literature, history, gov- 
ernment ,economics, and sociology. The social sciences really form 
the core of this major, but American contributions to the 
humanities are not neglected. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, with these exceptions: 

(1) English 221-2 must be taken as partial satisfaction of the 
English requirements. 

(2) Art 381-2 is recommended to satisfy the mathematics or 
fine arts requirement. 

(3) Political Science 201-2 must be taken to satisfy the require- 
ment in social science. 

(4) History 201-2, American History, is taken to satisfy the his- 
tory requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn forty- two credits 
in courses in American Ideals and Institutions. Twenty-four of 
the required credits must be: 

History 101-2, History of Civilization 6 credits 

History 441-2, Intel, and Soc. History of the U. S 6 credits 

History 431-2, Diplomatic History of the U. S 6 credits 

English 461-2, Adv. Studies in Amer. Literature 6 credits 

Eighteen additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

History 351-2, History of the South 6 credits 

Pol. Science 301-2, Constitutional History of the U. S. 6 credits 

Econ. 211-2, Econ. Development of the U. S 6 credits 

Geo. 311-2, Econ. Geography of the Americas 6 credits 

Sociology 201-2, Principles and Problems of Sociology 6 credits 
Econ. 201-2, Econ. Principles and Problems 6 credits 



86 Mary Washington College 

Pol. Science 412, State Government of Virginia 3 credits 

Pol. Science 431, Propaganda and Politics 3 credits 

Sociology 421, Race Relations 3 credits 

Early Humanities 
Adviser: Dr. Laura B. Voelkel 

The interdepartmental major in the early humanities is cen- 
tered around classical civilization and culture. Courses in the 
art, philosophy, history, and literature of ancient Greece and 
Rome constitute the basic requirements. Either Latin or Greek 
must be taken in addition to a modern language, and both are 
recommended. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree, with these exceptions: 

(1) English 211-2 must be taken as partial satisfaction of the 
English requirement. 

(2) French must be taken to satisfy the language requirement. 

(3) Art 111-2 must be taken to satisfy the mathematics and 
fine arts requirement. 

(4) Philosophy 201-2 must be taken to satisfy the social science 

requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn forty-two credits 
in courses in the early humanities. Thirty of the required credits 
must be: 

Latin or Greek 12 credits 

History 331-2, Culture of Ancient Med. World 6 credits 

Philosophy 421-2, Classical Philosophy 6 credits 

Art 301-2, Hist, of Arch, and Sculpture 6 credits 

Twelve additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

Latin or Greek 12 credits 

Philosophy 301-2, History of Philosophy 6 credits 

Art 311-2, History of Painting 6 credits 

English 471-2, World Literature 6 credits 

Music 305-6, History of Music 4 credits 

Philosophy 322, Aesthetics 3 credits 



The Curriculum 87 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology 
Adviser: Dr. William A. Castle 

The College offers a degree program in Medical Technology in 
cooperation with the University of Virginia Department of 
Medicine. The curriculum covers three nine-month winter ses- 
sions at Mary Washington College and, beginning in September 
following the junior year, a period of twelve months at the Uni- 
versity. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology will 
be awarded by Mary Washington College on successful com- 
pletion of the fourth academic year, and at the completion of 
the twelve-month period at Charlottesville the student will 
be eligible to take the examinations for registration and certifica- 
tion by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The number admitted 
to the final twelve-month training period is limited by the facili- 
ties available at the Medical School. Admission to the last two 
years of the program will be based upon scholastic record, demon- 
strated aptitude, and a personal interview at the Medical School. 

THE CURRICULUM 

At Mary Washington College 

First Year 

Sem. hrs. 

English 1 1 1-1 12 6 

Biology 121-122 ..... 8 

Chemistry 1 1 1-1 12 ~ 8 

Mathematics „ „ .. 6 

Hygiene „ 2 

Physical Education „ 2 

Total „ 32 

Second Year 

Sem. hrs. 

English 211-212 or 221-222 6 

French or German M 6 

Chemistry 201-331 „ „. 8 

Biology* „ „ 8 

Physical Education 2 

Total „ „ 30 

•Comparative Anatomy, Histology, Embryology, Parasitology, or Bacteriology. 



88 Mary Washington College 



Third Year 

Sem. hrs. 

French or German 6 

Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Economics, or Philosophy 6 

History 20 1 -202 6 

Physics, Chemistry, or Biology 8 

Elective 6 

Total 32 

At University of Virginia Department of Medicine 

Fourth Year 

Sem. hrs. 

Clinical Pathology _ „ „ „ 5 

Clinical Pathology Laboratory* 20 

Microbiology „ 8 

Total „ 33 

EXPENSES 

Charges for tuition, room and board, etc., for the three sessions 
at Mary Washington College are listed on pages 42-44. 

The charges for the fourth year when the student is registered 
and in attendance at the University of Virginia are as follows: 



Tuition 

Library Fee 

Medical Fee „ „ 

Athletic Fee 

Student Publications Fee 

Women Students' Association Fee 
Totals 



'irginians 


Non-Virginians 


$210.00 


$450.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


15.00 


15.00 


4.00 


4.00 


3.00 


3.00 


$272.00 


$512.00 



Students in attendance at the University of Virginia may live 
in the Women's Dormitory and have all the privileges of women 
students registered in other Departments of the University. Per- 
sonal expenses, in addition to the fees listed above, average ap- 
proximately $1100.00 for the twelve month period. 

In the event that a student enrolled in this program should 
not qualify for admission to the Clinical Laboratories of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia Department of Medicine she may continue 
with the regular degree program at Mary Washington College, 
and the courses she has taken may be applied to a major in 
biology or chemistry. 

•Experience in hematology, clinical chemistry, serology, bacteriology, mycology, toxi- 
cology, blood typing, determination of basal metabolism and other clinical laboratory 
methods. 



B.S. Degree in Physical Therapy 89 

The Clinical Laboratories of the University of Virginia De- 
partment of Medicine are approved by the Board of Registry of 
the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and by the Council 
on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association. Students completing the program as outlined meet 
the requirements of the Registry of Medical Technologists. 

Students desiring to enroll in this program should make appli- 
cation to the Director of Admissions, Mary Washington College 
of the University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

B. S. Degree in Physical Therapy 
Adviser: Miss Anna Scott Hoye 

There is an urgent need for physical therapists (1) in the field 
of general medicine, neurology, orthopedics, and surgery; (2) for 
work with crippled children; and (3) for specialized services in 
the hospitals of the army, navy, and the Veterans Administration. 

Mary Washington College has inaugurated a program for the 
preparation of physical therapists in cooperation with the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia. It provides for three years of liberal arts 
work at Mary Washington College and a fourth year of special- 
ized training at the Baruch Center of Physical Medicine at the 
Medical College of Virginia. Upon completion of the required 
courses at the Medical College of Virginia, the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Physical Therapy will be awarded by Mary 
Washington College. 

An outline of the program follows. Students who plan to fol- 
low this curriculum should notify the Registrar so that they may 
participate in the orientation activities planned for this group. 

First Year 

Course No. Title Sern. hrs. 

Eng. 111-112 Comp. & Read „ - 6 

Math. 111-112 or Math. 161-162 6 

Biol. 121-122 Gen. Biology 8 

Chem. 111-117 Gen. Chemistry 8 

H. Ed. 100 Hygiene - M 2 

P. Ed. 120 Fundamentals of Rhythm (first semester) _ 1 

P. Ed. 215 Intermed. Swim, (second semester) 1 

32 



go Mary Washington College 



Second Year 

Eng. 211-212 Eng. Lit., or Eng. 221-222 Am. Lit 6 

Foreign Language ~. „ „.„ 6 

Physics 201 Gen. Physics 6 

Biol. 337-338 Anatomy and Physiology 8 

Physical Education 2 



30 



Third Year 



Psy. 201-202 Gen. Psychology „ „.. „ 6 

Hist. 201-202 American History 6 

Socio. 201-202 Prin. of Sociology „ 6 

Foreign Language .... 6 

Phys. Ed. 441-442 Applied Physiology and Kinesiology 8 

32 

Orientation without credit is offered every year in the form of 
a professional club sponsoring visitations, indoctrination lectures, 
etc. 

Fourth Year 

(At Medical College of Virginia) 

First Semester 

Anatomy .. 4 

Physiology .... 3 

Medical Physics — 2 

Pathology - 2 

Pre-clinical Subjects ~ 1 

Massage 2 

Phototherapy „ .. 1 

Hydrotherapy _ 1 



16 



Second Semester 



Anatomy .„ 4 

Medical Sciences 4 

Therapeutic Exercise 3 

Electrotherapy 3 

Ethics and Administration 1 

Orientation and Journal Club .... 1 

Clinical Practice 

16 

Three additional months of full-time clinical practice are re- 
quired at the end of the didactic period of study. 



Program 9 1 

Cooperative Program in Nursing 
Adviser: Miss Helen H. Schultz 
The University of Virginia is now prepared to offer a program 
in Nursing leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nurs- 
ing. The curriculum covers a period of four and one-half years, 
with the student spending the first two nine-month winter ses- 
sions at Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia 
in Fredericksburg, and the remaining time at the University of 
Virginia School of Nursing. There will be a summer session of 
six weeks in the School of Nursing following each winter session 
in college. These summer sessions will be devoted to the Princi- 
ples and Arts of Nursing and will include hospital practice. Such 
experience will be designed to give the student an insight into 
actual bedside nursing. 



PROGRAM 

First Year Course— Mary Washington College 



1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Cr. hrs. Cr. hrs. 



English 111-112 Composition and Reading. 3 3 

Biology 121-122 General Biology 4 4 

Chemistry 111-117 General Chemistry..-.. 4 4 

History 201-202 American History 3 3 

Health Education 100, Hygiene. — 1 1 

Physical Education - 1 1 

16 16 

Summer Course— 6 weeks, University of Virginia School of Nursing 

Introduction to Nursing Arts I, (30 hrs. lecture 4 

60 hrs. laboratory 
Professional Adjustments I, 15 hrs. (Hospital practice) 1 



YEAR'S TOTAL 37 

Second Year Course— Mary Washington College 

3rd. Sem. 4th Sem. 

Cr. hrs. Cr. hrs. 

English : „ „ 3 3 

Biology 371 , Bacteriology 4 

Biology 382, Anatomy and Physiology 5 

Home Economics 231-232, Foods and Nutrition „ 3 2 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology 3 3 

Sociology „ M 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

17 17 



92 Mary Washington College 

Summer Course— 6 weeks, University of Virginia School of Nursing 

Introduction to Nursing Arts II (30 hrs. lecture. 4 

60 hrs. laboratory) 
Pharmacology 1 (10 hrs. lecture, 10 hrs. laboratory 

Hospital Practice) 1 

5 
YEAR'S TOTAL 39 

Third Year Course— University of Virginia School of Nursing 

Hrs. 

Nursing Arts III (10 hrs. lecture, 10 practice) 20 

Pharmacology II 45 

Diet Therapy - „ — 30 

Introduction to Medical Science 
Medical Nursing 



Surgical N ursing 

O. R. Technique 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Specialties ~ 



225 



Sem. Hrs. 


Days 
Practice 


1 




3 




2 


28 


17 


112 

112 

56 



Summer 

History of Nursing - 30 2 

Outpatient Department 28 

Vacation - 28 

YEAR'S TOTAL 380 25 264 

Fourth Year Course— University of Virginia School of Nursing 



Mental Hygiene (1) 

Child Development and Guidance (2) 

Obstetrical Nursing - 

Pediatric Nursing 



Irs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Days 
Practice 


45 


3 




45 


3 




45 


3 


77 


60 


4 


112 


45 


3 


84 


30 


2 





Psychiatric Nursing 45 

Public Health Nursing 

Summer 

Supervision (1) 45 3 

Surgical Nursing Experience ~ 28 

Medical Nursing Experience - - 35 

Vacation .».„ „ „ 28 

YEAR'S TOTAL 315 21 264 



Program 



93 



Fifth Year Course— University of Virginia School of Nursing 



Professional Adjustments II .... 
Medical Nursing Experience ., 
Surgical Nursing Experience 

Public Health Affiliation .. 

Elective (3) 



Hrs. 

, 30 



Sem. Hrs. 



YEAR'S TOTAL 



30 



TOTALS 



124 



(1) Course taught by Nursing Education Department. 

(2) Course taught by Child Service Center Staff. 

(3) 30 days sick leave to be allowed if necessary. 



Days 
Practice 

28 
35 
56 
65 

184 

856 days 
practice 
56 days 

vacation 



Tuition and Expense— University of Virginia School of Nursing 
(For Tuition and Expenses at Mary Washington College, see catalogue) 

1st 2nd 1st 2nd 3rd 

Summer Summer Clinical Yr. Clinical Yr. Clinical Yr. 

(6 xvks.) (6 wks.) (12 mos.) (12 mos.) (6 mos.) 



Tuition 



425.00 $25.00 $100.00 $100.00 



Activities 5.00 

Health 1.50 

Room, Board and Laundry ... 90.00 

Breakage 

Books 8.75 

Special Testing 

Bandage Scissors 3.00 



5.00 


30.00 


25.00 


25.00 


1.50 


12.00 


12.00 


6.00 


90.00 





^ 


_«___ 


............ 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


3.75 


20.50 


18.00 


............ 


„ 


5.00 


—■ r ■„ 


2.00 



TOTAL 



4133.25 $125.25 $172.50 $160.00 



$38.00 



These are estimates and are subject to change. 

The above amounts are payable at the beginning of each 
period as indicated. In addition to the above, the student will be 
required to purchase a full set of uniforms and a pair of duty 
shoes before beginning her first summer term. The uniforms cost 
$90.60 for the entire period in the School, and the duty shoes cost 
from $8.00 to $10.00 per pair. 

Students interested in making application should write to: 

Registrar 

Mary Washington College 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



94 Mary Washington College 

Applications should be submitted early in order to insure 
enrollment in College at the desired date. 

Before the student begins her first year of college, application 
should also be made to: 

Director of Nurses and Nursing Service 
University of Virginia Hospital 
School of Nursing 
University Station 
Charlottesville, Virginia 

The aptitude test required of all applicants will be scheduled 
in the summer preceding the first winter in College, and the stu- 
dent's application and school record must be in the Director of 
Nurses' Office before the applicant can be given an appointment 
to take the test. Those students who have completed a portion of 
their college course before making application to the School of 
Nursing will be required to take the test before appointment to 
this School of Nursing is made. 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education 

Students who wish to prepare specifically for teaching in the 
elementary grades may enroll in a cooperative program for the 
preparation of elementary teachers leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education at the University of Virginia. 

This program provides that the first two years of general aca- 
demic work be taken at Mary Washington College and the third 
and fourth years be taken in the School of Education at the 
University of Virginia in Charlottesville. 

Students interested in the cooperative program sponsored by 
the University of Virginia and Mary Washington College should 
apply for admission to Mary Washington College stating their de- 
sire to take elementary education. Upon enrollment, the School 
of Education at the University will be notified of the stu- 
dent's choice and the student's adviser at Mary Washington Col- 
lege, in cooperation with the Dean of that College and the Dean 
of the School of Education, will institute a program to help 
the student carry out the work successfully. 



Program 



95 



Specifically, the curriculum to be followed is given below. 
(Electives in the third and fourth years must be selected, subject 
to the approval of the adviser, in accordance with the major and 
minor requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Educa- 
tion.) 

AT MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

First Year Second Year 

Semester- Semester- 

hours hours 

English ~.~ ~~ 6 English 3 

Mathematics or Science 6 Geography „ 3 

Music 6 Art 6 

Physical Education 2 General and Educational 

Hygiene 2 Psychology 6 

American History »_ 6 Social Studies 6 

Electives ~ 3 Physical Education 2 

Electives 6 

31 

32 



AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 

Third Year Fourth Year 

Semester- Semester- 

hours hours 

Education 1 2 Education 17 6 

Education 2 3 Education 19 9 

Education 3 3 Education 103 „ 3 

Education 4 2 Electives 14 

Speech 3 or 4 3 

Electives „ 18 32 

31 



Course Offerings 



Courses are offered in the following fields: 



Art 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Dramatic Art and 

Speech 
Economics and Business 

Administration 
Education 
English 
French 



Geography 

General Language 

Geology 

German 

Greek 

Health, Physical 

Education, and 

Recreation 
History 

Home Economics 
Italian 



Mathematics 

Latin 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Russian 

Sociology 

Spanish 



Course offerings are listed under these headings in the above 
order on the pages that follow. 

Course Numbers. — Courses numbered from 100 to 199, in- 
clusive, are first-year courses; 200 to 299, second-year courses; 300- 
399, third-year courses; and 400-499, fourth-year courses. 

Students are not permitted to enroll for courses that are more 
than one year above or below their classification. 

Credits. — All course credits are expressed in semester hours. A 
course listed as "six credits" is a continuous course for the session 
of nine months and carries a credit of six semester hours. Courses 
listed as "three credits each semester" may be taken for a semester 
only if desired. 

ART 

Professor Binford 

Associate Professors Duggan, Faulkner, Schnellock 

Assistant Professors Cecere, King 

Instructor Krupenski 

Students who select art as a major program must earn at least 
thirty-six credits in art and certain related fields of study recom- 
mended by members of the Art Department. 



History and Application of Art 97 

In order to receive credit for courses in the practice of art, stu- 
dents must earn an equal number of credits in the history and ap- 
preciation of art. 

Courses in art are not limited to students whose major program 
is in this field, but are open to any student who wishes to develop 
her creative and critical ability. 

Art 101-102, Drawing and Design, or its equivalent, is required 
of all students who choose art as a major program. Students with 
previous training in art are requested to bring samples of their 
work, if possible, to facilitate proper placement in more advanced 
courses. 

History and Appreciation of Art 

Art 111-112. Art Appreciation. A historical survey of architecture, sculpture, 
painting, and the decorative arts, emphasizing the analysis, criticism, and 
comparison of these art forms in relation to their periods and in relation 
to one another. Three periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. 
Mr. Schnellock, Dr. King. 

Art 291. Home Design. A general consideration of the principles of design 
and color as applied to contemporary home architecture and to the selection 
and arrangement of home furnishings, with a brief study of period styles and 
their adaptation for modern use. Three periods a week. Three credits. Fee, 
$3.00 for the semester. Miss Duggan. 

Art 301-302. History of Architecture and Sculpture. The arts from earliest 
times through the Byzantine and Gothic periods; Renaissance and Western 
European art; Modern art. Three periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $3.00 for 
the session. Mr. Cecere. 

Art 311-312. History of Painting. From the earliest times through the Italian 
Renaissance; Western European painting; modern painting. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. Miss Duggan. 

Art 321-322. Graphic Arts. Prerequisite: At least one year of drawing, design, 
and composition. Studies in the history and appreciation of prints as etching, 
lithography, dry-point, mezzotint, woodcut; practice in designing, cutting, and 
printing woodcuts. One single period and two double periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Fee, $3.00 each semester. Miss Duggan. 

Art 381-382. American Art. Recommended prerequisite: Art 111-112. Archi- 
tecture, sculpture, painting, illustration, graphic arts, and decorative arts 
from colonial times to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits. Fee, 
$3.00 for the session. Dr. King. 

Art 385-386. Art and Archaeology. Recommended also as part of the major 
program in Latin. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Voelkel. 

Art 421-422. Art of the East. A study of the art of India, China, Japan, and 
Moslem art. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 
See, also, Philosophy 322. Aesthetics. 

Practice of Art 

Art 101-102. Drawing and Design. An introductory course in which emphasis 
is placed on the expression of creative ideas and the development of skills in 



98 Mary Washington College 

the use of art mediums. Two double periods a week. Two credits each se- 
mester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Miss Duggan. 

Art 211-212. Figure Sketch. Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or its equivalent. Figure 
sketching from the costumed model; creative composition; beginning portrai- 
ture. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each 
semester. Miss Duggan. 

Art 221-222. Photography. The theory and practice of various phases of 
photography. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Fee, 
$7.50 each semester. To be announced. 

Art 231-232. Modeling. An introductory study of the processes involved in 
sculpture through practice with plastic mediums. Three double periods a 
week. Two credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Mr. Cecere. 

Art 241-242. Drawing and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 101-102 and Art 
211-212, or their equivalents. Picture-making in various mediums; life sketch; 
simple still-life painting in water-color and tempera. Three double periods a 
week. Two credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Mr. Binford. 

Art 251-252. Ceramics. Prerequisite: Art 101-102, Drawing and Design or 
Art 231-232, Modeling, as the equivalent. A study in designing, firing and 
glazing objects suitable for this medium. For beginners. Three double periods 
a week. Two credits each semester. Fee $5.00 each semester. Mrs. Krupenski. 

Art 331-332. Mural Painting and Composition. Figure drawing, composition, 
and creative design as applied to the making of sketches and actual murals. 
Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each se- 
mester. (Offered in alternate years with Art 431432, Advanced Mural Painting 
and Composition. Offered in 1953-54.) Mr. Schnellock. 

Art 341-342. Sculpture. Prerequisite: Art 231-232, or its equivalent. A creative 
study of sculptural problems with studio practice in casting and mould-mak- 
ing. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each 
semester. Mr. Cecere. 

Art 351-352. Oil Painting. Prerequisite: Art 241-242, or its equivalent. Still 
life and figure painting in oils. Three double periods a week. Two credits 
each semester. The fee covers bimonthly trips to Washington or Richmond 
art galleries as part of the visual education program. Students will buy their 
own painting materials for this class. Fee, $7.50 each semester. Mr. Binford. 

Art 361-362. Life Drawing and Painting. Prerequisite: One or more classes 
in drawing and painting. Three double periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Art 371-372. Life Modeling. Prerequisite: Art 341-342. Studio practice in 
modeling heads and figures from life. Three double periods a week. Two 
credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Art 381-382. Ceramics. Prerequisite: Art 251-252. A more advanced study of 
creative design in ceramics. Three double periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Mrs. Krupenski. 

Art 401-402. Figure Painting. Prerequisite: Art 351-352, or its equivalent. 
Figure and portrait painting; landscape in the spring. Three double periods a 
week. Two credits each semester. The fee covers bimonthly trips to Washing- 
ton or Richmond art galleries as part of the visual education program. Stu- 
dents will buy their own painting materials for this class. Fee, $7.50 each 
semester. Mr. Binford. 

Art 411-412. Sculptural Composition and Portraiture. Prerequisite: Art 341- 
342. Studio practice in sculpture with emphasis on design, composition, and 
portraiture. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Fee, 
$5.00 each semester. Mr. Cecere. 



Astronomy 99 

Art 431-432. Advanced Mural Painting and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 
331-332. A continued study of painting and composition with emphasis on 
more advanced problems. Three double periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 
1953-54.) Mr. Schnellock. 

ASTRONOMY 

Assistant Professor Burns 

Astronomy 361-362. Elementary Astronomy. An historical and descriptive 
survey of the physical universe. Three periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $3.00 
for the session. Mr. Burns. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Castle 

Associate Professors Peirce, Schultz 

Assistant Professors Black, Hoye 

Instructors Pitman, Pinschmidt 

Students who plan a major program in biology must choose 
courses only in consultation with an adviser representing the de- 
partment so as to assure the achievement of a coordinated plan 
of study that will develop the student's interest in the field. 

To fulfill the requirements for a major program in biology, a 
student must take twenty-four semester hours of credit in biology 
courses more advanced than Biology 121-122, General Biology, 
and twelve semester hours in the related fields of chemistry, 
physics, geology, and mathematics. 

Biology 121-122. General Biology. General biological principles and their 
application; a survey of structure and function of representative plant and 
animal types, including man. Three single and one double period a week. 
Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. Staff. 

Biology 221-222. Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. Prereq- 
uisite: Biology 121-122. Classification, distribution, natural history, and com- 
parative morphology of vertebrates. Two single and two double periods a 
week. Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. Mr. Pitman. 

Biology 231-232. Plant Morphology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122. Gross 
and microscopic structure of representatives of the major plant groups. Two 
single and two double periods a week. Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Plant Morphology will be 
offered as Biology 231, a one-semester four-credit course in 1954-55. Fee, $4.50. 
Dr. Peirce. 

Biology 241-242. Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122. Classifi- 
cation, morphology, distribution, natural history, and economic importance 
of the invertebrates. Three single and one double period a week. Eight credits. 
Fee, $9.00 for the session. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 



ioo Mary Washington College 

Biology 331-332. Microscopic Technique. Embryology. Prerequisite: Biology 
121-122. The preparation and study of tissues; the development of representa- 
tive animals. Two single and two double periods a week. Four credits eacb 
semester. Fee, $4.50 each semester. Dr. Black, Dr. Castle. 

Biology 337-338. Anatomy and Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122. 
Anatomy includes a study of the gross structures of the human body with 
emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Physiology presents 
a study of the adaptations of the human body to changes in environment, 
both external and internal. Three single periods plus one double period a 
week for the session. Eight credits. Fee, $4.50 each semester. (For majors in 
physical education and physical therapy only. Not credited toward major 
program in biology.) Miss Hoye. 

Biology 341-342. Field Zoology and Animal Ecology. Prerequisite: Biology 
241-242. The collection, identification, and behavior of animals; the relation- 
ship of animals to their environment. Two single and two double periods a 
week. Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. (Offered in alternate years.) 
Field Zoology will be offered as Biology 341, a one-semester, four-credit course 
in 1953-54. Fee, $4.50. 

Biology 351-352. Field Botany and Plant Ecology. Prerequisite: Biology 
231-232. The collection, identification, and study of local wild and cultivated 
plants; the relationship of plants to their environment. Two single and two 
double periods a week. Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. (Not offered 
in 1953-54.) 

Biology 371-372. Bacteriology. Parasitology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122 
and one year of college chemistry. Two single and two double periods a 
week. Four credits each semester. Fee, $7.50 each semester. Dr. Peirce, Dr. 
Black. 

Biology 382. Anatomy and Physiology. For students in the cooperative 
nursing curriculum only. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122 and one year of col- 
lege chemistry. Three single and two double periods a week during the second 
semester. Five credits. Fee, $7.50. Mr. Pinschmidt. 

Biology 411-412. General Animal Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 221-222 
and one year of chemistry. Two single and two double periods a week. Eight 
credits. Fee, $15.00 for the session. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Biology 441-442. Genetics and Eugenics. Prerequisite: One course in biology 
on the second year level. Three single and one double period a week. Eight 
credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. (Not offered in 1953-54.) Heredity and 
Eugenics will be offered as Biology 441, a one-semester, four-credit course in 
1953-54. Fee, $4.50. Dr. Castle. 

Biology 451-452. Anatomy, Physiology and Taxonomy of the Flowering 
Plants. Prerequisite: Biology 231-232 and one year of chemistry. Two single 
and two double periods a week. Eight credits. Fee, $9.00 for the session. (Not 
offered in 1953-54.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Insley 

Associate Professor Schultz 

Assistant Professors Cover, Shull 

To fulfill the requirements for a major program in chemistry, 
a student must take twenty-four semester hours of credit in 
chemistry courses more advanced than Chemistry 111-112, Gen- 



Chemistry 101 

eral Chemistry, and twelve semester hours in the related fields 
of biology, physics, geology, and mathematics. 

So as to assure a coordinated plan of study, a student whose 
major program is chemistry must choose courses in chemistry and 
related fields only in consultation with a representative of the 
department. Mathematics 111-112 is recommended for the fresh- 
man year if the student plans to take courses in analytical or 
theoretical chemistry. 

Chemistry 111-112. General Chemistry. A course designed to introduce the 
student to the fundamental laws of chemistry, the most important elements, 
and their compounds. One double and three single periods a week. Eight 
credits. Fee, $15.00 for the session. Staff. 

Chemistry 115. Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. Enrollment 
limited to students majoring in home eonomics. Not credited toward major in 
chemistry. One double and three single periods a week for second semester. 
Four credits. Fee, $7.50. Dr. Insley. 

Chemistry 117. Organic and Biological Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
111. For students in the co-operative nursing and physical therapy programs 
only. One double and three single periods a week during the second semester. 
Four credits. Fee, $7.50. Miss Schultz. 

Chemistry 201-202. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111-112. This course covers briefly 
the theory and practice of qualitative analysis. Introductory quantitative 
analysis will be started during the second semester. One single and three 
double periods a week. Four credits each semester. Fee, $7.50 each semester. 
Dr. Cover. 

Chemistry 217. Biological Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 115, 117 or 
311. The chemistry of foods, digestion, nutrition, etc. One double and three 
single periods a week during the first semester. Four credits. Fee, $7.50. 
(Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) For Home Economics majors; 
not credited toward a major program in chemistry. Miss Schultz. 

Chemistry 311-312. Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. A 
course designed as an introduction to alipathic and aromatic compounds. One 
double and three single periods a week. Eight credits. Fee, $15.00 for the 
session. Dr. Insley. 

Chemistry 331-332. Quantitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201-202, 
and Mathematics 111-112. An introduction to the theory and technique of 
quantitative chemical analysis. One single and three double periods a week. 
Four credits each semester. Fee, $7.50 each semester. Dr. Cover. 

Chemistry 491-492. Advanced General and Introductory Theoretical Chemi- 
stry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. A course designed to give chemistry 
majors an introduction to the fundamental principles of theoretical inorganic 
chemistry. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not 
offered in 1953-54.) 

Chemistry 495-496. Physical Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, 
Chemistry 491492, and Mathematics 211-212. Three single and one three- 
hour period a week. Four credits each semester. Fee, $7.50 each semester. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 



102 Mary Washington College 

DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH 

Instructors Mark Sumner, Klein, Duke 

Students undertaking a major program in Dramatic Arts and 
Speech are required to take thirty-six credits in that and related 
fields. Twenty-four of these required credits must be selected 
from the courses offered by the Department of Dramatic Arts 
and Speech and must include Speech 231-232, Effective Speech. 
At least twelve credits must be earned in courses chosen from the 
following related fields of study: American literature, English 
literature, foreign languages, physics, mathematics, psychology, 
art, and music. 

The faculty of the Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech 
will recommend courses in these fields to suit the individual 
needs of each student who selects Dramatic Arts and Speech as 
her major study. 

Dramatic Arts 311-312. Survey of World Theatre. A survey of actors, 
theatres, and selected plays in primitive, ancient, and modern civilizations. 
Theatre excursions to be arranged. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 321-322. Acting. General principles of acting; elementary work 
in voice and pantomime; development of characterization; advanced problems 
in rehearsal and public performance. First-year students may enroll with the 
consent of instructor. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 331-332. Playwriting. The writing of long and short plays, 
sketches, radio continuity, and movie scenarios. Consideration of character, 
development, plot structure, dialogue, and practical production. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Sumner. 

Dramatic Arts 341. Costume Design and Make-up. History and design of 
stage costuming. Theory and practice of theatrical make-up. Three periods a 
week for first semester. Three credits. Fee, $3.00 Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 351. Stage Lighting. History and theory of lighting. Practical 
application to basic problems, College Theatre productions, and experimental 
ideas. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. Mr. Sumner. 

Dramatic Arts 411-412. Stagecraft and Design. Design of entire production. 
Lighting, costume, make-up, with practical applications in College Theatre. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Fee, $2.00 each semester. 
Mr. Sumner. 

Dramatic Arts 431-432. Directing. History, technique, and practice of direct- 
ing the long and short play. Problems of high school, college, and com- 
munity theatre. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. 
Sumner. 

Dramatic Arts 441. Dramatic Criticism. Analysis of dramatic criticism from 
Aristotle to the present. Application to representative plays. Three periods a 
week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Klein. 

Speech 231-232. Effective Speech. Development of purity and resonance of 
tone and pleasing, effective diction. Interpretation of literature, monologue, 



Economics and Business Administration 103 

voice choir, story-telling. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
Fee, $1.00 each semester. Mr. Duke. 

Speech 301-302. Public Speaking and Speech Composition. Methods of prep- 
aration and delivery of various types of speeches, including extemporaneous 
speeches, discussions and conferences. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Speech 361-362. Radio Broadcasting. Art forms basic to radio. Announcing, 
script-writing, radio speech. Preparation of broadcasts and recordings for 
station WMWC. Program time to be arranged. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Mr. Duke. 

Speech 421-422. Phonetics and Voice Science. Principles of phonetics and 
other voice sciences. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Not 
offered in 1953-54.) 

Speech 461-462. Advanced Radio Broadcasting. Continuation of techniques 
of radio speech and program preparation. Elements of engineering and radio 
law required of applicants for radiotelephony license. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Fee, $5.00 each semester. Mr. Duke. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor J. H. Dodd 

Associate Professors Roach, Hewetson, Miller 

Assistant Professor Sublette 

A major program in Economics and Business Administration 
requires the completion of thirty-six credits in courses distributed 
according to the following plan. The student will take 

1. All of the following: 

Economics 201-202, Economic Principles and 

Problems 6 credits 

Economics 211-212, Economic Development of 

the United States 6 credits 

Economics 221-222, Introductory Accounting, 

or Mathematics 361-362, Statistics 6 credits 

2. Two courses selected from 

Economics 321-322, Money and Credit 6 credits 

Economics 341 or 342, Public Finance 3 credits 

Economics 351 or 352, Labor Economics 3 credits 

Economics 401 or 402, International Trade 

and Finance 3 credits 

Economics 441-442, Comparative Economic 

Systems 6 credits 

3. Nine additional credits in economics plus six credits in 
economics, government, psychology, history, or sociology. 



104 Mary Washington College 

Students primarily interested in business organization and ao 
tivities should select additional courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Business Administration. Those who 
are primarily interested in social problems or government should 
select additional courses in sociology, psychology, government, 
and history. Courses selected in these related fields must be ap- 
proved by the student's adviser in the Department of Economics 
and Business Administration. 

Economics 201-202. Economic Principles and Problems. Fundamental eco- 
nomic principles relating to the production, exchange, consumption, and 
distribution of wealth; examination of basic economic problems. Three per- 
iods a week. Six credits. Dr. J. H. Dodd, Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 211-212. Economic Development of the United States. A study 
of the economic phases in the development of the United States from colonial 
times. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 221-222. Introductory Accounting. A study of the fundamental 
accounting principles and practices in the recording and interpretation of 
accounting data. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. 
Miller. 

Economics 301-302. Intermediate Accounting. Prerequisite: Economics 221- 
222, or its equivalent. A study of statement-making and applications of ac- 
counting principles to particular phases and types of enterprise. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Miller. 

Economics 311-312. Marketing Economics. The functions and organization 
of marketing, the principles and techniques of retail merchandising, and 
principles and practices in advertising. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 321-322. Money and Credit. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. 
Theory of money and credit, banking organization and practice, foreign ex- 
change, international movements of capital, and the financial aspects of busi- 
ness cycles. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 331-332. Business Law. Law and its administration, contracts, and 
the applications of law in connection with business activities and relationships. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Sublette. 

Economics 341-342. Public Finance. Expenditures and revenues of govern- 
mental units, theory and incidence of taxes, public debts, and fiscal adminis- 
tration. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 
alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. J. H. Dodd. 

Economics 351. Labor Economics. A study of manpower, the labor force, 
and the organized labor movement; the types, structure, policies, and programs 
of employee and employer organizations; and the legal aspects of industrial 
disputes. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. J. H. Dodd. 

Economics 352. Labor Economics and Personnel Administration. A study 
of the basic principles and policies of personnel administration; functions and 
qualifications of the personnel administrator; problems, including labor turn- 
over, grievances, recruitment, selection, training, wages and hours, and em- 
ployee services and programs. Three periods a week for the second semester. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. J. H. Dodd. 

Economics 401-402. International Trade and Finance. World economic re- 
sources, pre-war economic international relations, and the problems of the 



Secretarial Courses 105 

present and the future international trade. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Economics 411-412. Government and Business. The functions of business 
and of government, and government regulatory measures. (See, also, Political 
Science 411412.) Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 421. Business Finance. The organization, financial policies, and 
public control of corporations and other forms of business organization. Three 
periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 422. Personal Finance. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. A study 
of tax reports, insurance, annuities, investments, and consumer finance. Three 
periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate 
years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 431. Public Utilities. A study of the nature and social significance 
of public transportation and communication agencies; public utility financing; 
services; rate making; and government control. Three periods a week for the 
first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) 
Dr. Hewetson. 

Economics 441-442. Economic Theory. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. 
Greek, Roman and medieval thought; the physiocrats and the mercantilists; 
the work of the classical and neo-classical economists; and trends in economic 
thought since the middle of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Economics 451-452. Comparative Economic Systems. The nature of socialism, 
communism, and fascism; the state of society in contemporary industrial na- 
tions. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. J. H. Dodd. 

Economics 461-462. Economic Development of Modern Europe. A study of 
the economic phases in the development of modern Europe. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Economics 471-472. Seminar in Economics. Directed individual research on 
an approved problem in economics. Hours by appointment. Three credits. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 

SECRETARIAL COURSES 

The following courses in secretarial science are offered in the 
Department of Economics and Business Administration. While 
these courses do not carry college credit, the standards of accom- 
plishment are equivalent to those of similar courses offered for 
credit on the college level. 

Commerce 111-112. Shorthand. Gregg Simplified Shorthand is taught. Short- 
hand theory is mastered the first semester. Dictation is emphasized the second 
semester, with dictation speeds ranging from 60 to 100 words a minute. Tran- 
scription of simple business letters occurs in the second semester. Five periods 
a week. No credit. Mr. Miller. 

Commerce 121-122. Typewriting. The proper techniques of typewriting and 
a mastery of the keyboard are developed. The form and content of business 
letters, addressing envelopes, centering, and tabulation are taught. A mini- 
mum speed of 35 words a minute should be attained. Five periods a week. 
No credit. Mr. Roach, Mr. Miller. 



106 Mary Washington College 

Commerce 211-212. Advanced Shorthand. Prerequisite: Commerce 111-112 
or equivalent. Dictation is given from unfamiliar matter at rates varying 
from 80 to 120 words a minute. Increased emphasis is placed upon the de- 
velopment of speed and accuracy in transcription. Attention is given to ar- 
rangement, spelling, punctuation, etc. Five periods a week. No credit. Mr. 
Roach. 

Commerce 221-222. Typewriting and Office Practice. Prerequisite: Commerce 
121-122 or equivalent. Special stress is placed upon perfecting techniques in 
typewriting. The student is taught to write and arrange letters, manuscripts 
and continuous articles, tabulated reports, financial statements, etc. 

The course also provides opportunity for acquiring a working knowledge 
of dictating and transcribing machines, duplicating devices and machines, 
calculating machines, and miscellaneous office appliances. Five periods a 
week. No credit. Mr. Roach. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Alvey, Parkinson 

Associate Professors Graves, Harrison 

Superintendent Fredericksburg Public Schools Guy H. Brown 

Supervisors 

The courses listed in this department are available as electives 
to students majoring in other fields who wish to qualify for the 
Collegiate Professional Certificate— the highest teacher's certifi- 
cate issued in Virginia. 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching in secondary 
school are advised to take Psychology 201-202, General Psycholo- 
gy, in the sophomore year, and Education 321-322, Secondary 
Education, in the junior year, and six additional hours in such 
psychology courses as Psychology of Learning, Child Psychology, 
Adolescent Psychology, Psychology of Personality, and Mental 
Hygiene. In the senior ear Philosophy 411-412, History and 
Philosophy of Education, is taken one semester and Education 
440, Supervised Teaching, the other semester. Both of these 
courses are offered for six semester hours' credit each semester. 

Education 311-312. Elementary Education. Techniques and materials for 
teaching in the elementary school. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Graves. 

Education 321-322. Secondary Education. The principles and purposes of 
secondary education, selection and organization of instructional materials, 
and direction and evaluation of pupil progress. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Dr. Alvey, Dr. Parkinson. 

Education 331-332. Principles of Teaching Home Economics. The principles, 
methods, techniques and types of organization helpful in the development of 
a family centered program with emphasis placed on the secondary level and 
on the promotion and organization of adult programs. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Miss Harrison. 



Education 107 

Education 411-412. History and Philosophy of Education. See Philosophy 
411412. 

Education 440. Supervised Teaching. Offered each semester. Six credits. 
Dr. Alvey and Staff. 

See, also, Psychology 345, Psychology of Learning; Psychology 
321, Child Psychology; and Psychology 322, Adolescent Psycholo- 
gy- 
Suggested Curriculum for Students Who Wish to Qualify 
for Teaching in the Elementary Grades: 

Degree: Bachelor of Arts Major: Psychology 

Students who wish to qualify for teaching in the elementary 
grades may do so by electing the necessary courses for certifica- 
tion as a part of their program leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. 

The following outline indicates how a student majoring in 
psychology may include in her program the courses that will 
enable her to qualify for teaching in the elementary grades. This 
outline includes all the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts 
degree as well as the requirements for a major in psychology. 



First Year 


1st Sem. 


2nd Sem, 


Eng. 111-112. Composition and Reading 
Music 111-112. Survey of Music 
Biol. 121-122. General Biology 
Foreign Language 
HEd. 100. Hygiene 
Phys. Ed. 106. Games 
Phys. Ed. 120. Rhythmetics 


3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
1 


3 
3 

4 
3 

1 

1 




15 


15 


Second Year 






Eng. 211-212. English Literature 

Foreign Language 

Psy. 201-202. General Psychology 

Hist. 201-202. American History 

Geog. 211-212. World Geography 

Phys. Ed. 115. Swimming 

Phys. Ed. 121. Folk Dancing and Singing Games 


3 

3 
3 
3 

3 

1 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



16 16 



108 Mary Washington College 

Third Year 

Ed. 311-312. Elementary Education 3 3 

Psy. 331-332. Child Development or a a 

Psy. 321-322. Child and Adoles. Psy. 3 6 

Psy. 342. Psychology of Personality 3 

Psy. 345. Psychology of Learning 3 

Music 101-102. School Music 1 1 

Pol. Sc. 201-202. American Government 3 3 

Electives* 3 3 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Phil. 411-412. Hist. & Phil, of Education 6 - 

Ed. 440. Supervised Teaching — 6 

Socio. 201-202. Principles of Sociology and Social Problems 3 3 

Psy. 311. Mental Hygiene 3 — 

Psy. 432. Clinical Procedures with Children — 3 
Art 111-112. Art Appreciation or 

Art 101-102. Drawing and Design 3 or A 6 ox A 

Elective 3 3 

18 or 17 18 or 17 

ENGLISH 

Professors Shankle, Whidden, Vogelback 

Associate Professor Croushore 

Assistant Professors Griffith, Kelly, Brandenburg, 

Lenhart, Wade, Early, Caverlee 

Students who choose a major program in English must take 
at least twenty-four credits in English and twelve credits in 
related subjects in addition to the freshman and sophomore 
English courses required of all students. 

English m-112 and English 211-212 or 221-222 are prerequis- 
ites to all 300 and 400 courses. 

To earn the required credits in English, students must take 
either English 351-352 or English 411-412 and eighteen additional 
credits in English courses numbered 300 or higher. 

Twelve credits of related work are to be selected from courses 
in Latin, Greek, the literature of the modern foreign languages, 
introduction to philosophy or the history of philosophy, the his- 

* History 101-102 is recommended as an elective. 



English 109 

tory of the theater, the history and appreciation of art, English 
history, American history, and European history. 

English 111-112. Composition and Reading. The mechanics of writing and 
an introduction to literature. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

English 201-202. Journalism. Prerequisite: English 111-112 or permission of 
the instructor. Basic news writing, types of news stories, and editing. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Griffith. 

English 211-212. Survey of English Literature. Prerequisite: English 111-112. 
Literary movements and types from Beowulf to the present. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. Required of English majors. Dr. Brandenburg. Dr. Griffith, 
Mr. Kelly, Dr. Lenhart, Dr. Early. 

English 221-222. Survey of American Literature. Prerequisite: English 111- 
112. American Backgrounds and literary movements and types from the 
colonial writers to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Crou- 
shore, Dr. Vogelback, Dr. Lenhart. 

English 301. The Short Story. Development of the short story, with major 
emphasis upon American authors. Three periods a week. Three credits. Dr. 
Shankle. ( 

English 302. Biography. The historical development of biographical writing 
—letters, diaries, journals, autobiographies, and biographies. Three periods a 
week. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. 
Whidden. 

English 321-322. Current Literature. Themes and style in present-day litera- 
ture. One period a week. Two credits. Dr. Shankle. 

English 341-342. English Drama. Origin and development of the drama from 
the Middle Ages through the nineteenth century. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered as English 
342, Elizabethan Drama, in 1953-54.) Dr. Whidden. 

English 345-346. Biblical Literature. The Old and New Testament writings, 
their origins, literary forms, and influence. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. (Not credited toward major in English.) Dr. Caverlee. 

English 351-352. Shakespeare. Shakespeare's development as a dramatist in 
the historical plays, comedies, and tragedies. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Dr. Shankle, Dr. Whidden. 

English 361-362. Eighteenth Century Literature. The works of Dryden, 
Pope, Johnson, and their major contemporaries. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 
Mr. Kelly. 

English 371-372. Nineteenth Century Literature. Romantic and Victorian 
poetry and prose. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Dr. 
Whidden, Dr. Brandenburg. 

English 381-382. The Novel. Development of the novel in England and 
America. Three periods a week. Six credits. Three credits each semester. Dr. 
Shankle, Dr. Vogelback. 

English 391-392. Modern Literature. The poetry, prose, and drama of the 
twentieth century. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Croushore. 

English 401-402. Advanced Composition. Practice in writing stories, essays, 
and other literary forms. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alter- 
nate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 



no Mary Washington College 

English 411-412. The History of the English Language. The structure and 
development of the language in England and America. Emphasis upon his- 
torical grammar and linguistic changes. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Shankle. 

English 421-422. Chaucer and His Contemporaries. Chaucer's literary back- 
grounds and his major works. Three periods a week. Three credits each se- 
mester. (Offered as English 421, Chaucer, in 1953-54.) Dr. Brandenburg. 

English 431-432. The Non-Dramatic Literature of the Renaissance. Elizabe- 
than and early Stuart poetry and prose, with emphasis upon the works of 
Spenser and Milton. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Offered as English 432, Milton and the Seventeenth Century, in 1953-54.) 
Dr. Croushore. 

English 441. Literary Interpretation and Criticism. Analysis and application 
of the principles of literary criticism. Three periods a week. (Offered in alter- 
nate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Three credits. 

English 451-452. Seminar in English Literature. Application of research 
methods to special problems in major figures or movements. Recommended 
for prospective graduate students. Three periods a week. (Offered in alternate 
years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Six credits. 

English 461-462. Advanced Studies in American Literature. Nationalism, 
Transcendentalism, the frontier, the rise of realism, regionalism, and other 
cultural movements. Material for study will vary from year to year. Three 
credits each semester. (Offered as English 461 in 1953-54.) Dr. Vogelback. 

English 471-472. World Literature. Types and movements in world litera- 
ture and the reading of great books in translation. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. (Offered as English 471 in 1953-54.) Dr. Shankle. 

FRENCH 

Professors J. H. Combs, Stansbury 

Associate Professor Boiling 

Assistant Professor Jones 

Students who undertake a major program in French must take 
thirty-six credits in French and related subjects. These credits are 
to be distributed in the following manner: 

i. Twenty-four credits in French, of which at least eighteen 
must be chosen from courses numbered 200 or higher and must 
include French 301-302, Survey of French Literature. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign 

language 1 2 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or the 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 



General Language hi 

Language 381-382, Origin and Development of 

Language 6 credits 

Art 311-312, History of Painting 6 credits 

History 321-322, European History from 325 to 

1 648 6 credits 

Unless exempted by the head of the department, each French 
major should live in the French House during at least one year 
of her college course. 

French 101-102. Beginning French. For students who enter college with 
fewer than two units in high school French. Five periods a week. Six credits. 
Staff. 

French 103-104. Intermediate French. Prerequisite: French 101-102, or two 
to three units of high school French. Grammar review; varied readings; oral 
and written work with emphasis on vocabulary building. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. Staff. 

French 201-202. Introduction to French Literature and Civilization. Pre- 
requisite: French 103-104 or four units in high school French. A study through 
selected French texts of the cultural and political background of France and 
the French people. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mrs. Boiling, Mr. Jones. 

French 301-302. Survey of French Literature. Prerequisite: French 201-202. 
Lectures, reports, and illustrative readings from representative writers. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Dr. J. H. Combs, Mrs. Boiling. 

French 303-304. The French Theatre. Prerequisite: French 301-302 or per- 
mission of the instructor. The theatre from the Renaissance to the present, 
with detailed study of the classical, romantic, and modern French drama. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1953-54.) Mrs. Boiling. 

French 305-306. Advanced French Composition and Conversation. Prereq- 
uisite: French 201-202 or permission of the instructor. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 

French 401-402. The French Novel. Prerequisite: French 201-202. A study 
of the novel in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) 
Dr. Stansbury. 

French 405-406. French Literature of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Cen- 
turies. Prerequisite: French 201-202 or permission of the instructor. The 
masterpieces of the Classical Period of French Literature and of the Age of 
Enlightement. Three periods a week. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered 
in 1953-54.) 

GENERAL LANGUAGE 

Professor J. H. Combs 

Language 381-382. Origin and Development of Language. Diversity and 
families of languages; curiosities of language; morphology and semantics. 
Elective credit only; not accepted as part of the foreign language requirements 
for a degree. Recommended as an elective for students following a major pro- 
gram in any of the foreign languages. Freshman admitted only with the con- 
sent of the instructor. Three periods a week. Three credits a semester. Dr. 
J. H. Combs. 



112 Mary Washington College 

GEOGRAPHY 

Associate Professor Mooney 

Geography 211-212. World Geography. A survey of the geography of Europe, 
Asia, North and South America, Africa, and Australia, with reference to 
topography, climate, industries, and peoples of each. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Mrs. Mooney. 

Geography 311-312. Economic Geography of the Americas. A survey of the 
elements of geography; economic regions of North America; major economic 
regions of South America. Three periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. Mrs. Mooney. 

Geography 321-322. Economic Geography of Eurasia. A study of the eco- 
nomic resources and regions of Europe and Asia, with particular attention to 
their influence upon world relationships. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. Mrs. Mooney. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor: To be announced 

Geology 321-322. Elementary Geology. A course designed to give the student 
an introduction to the fundamental principles of geology. One double and 
three single periods a week. In addition to the regular class periods a number 
of field trips are required. Eight credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. 

Geology 461-462. Economic Geology. Prerequisite: Geology 321-322. General 
principles dealing with the origin, distribution, mining, milling, and uses of 
metallic and non-metallic ores and minerals. Three periods a week. Several 
field trips to mines, quarries, and plants. Six credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 

GERMAN 

Professor Brenner 

Students who choose a major program in German must take 
thirty-six credits in German and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1. Twenty-four credits in German, of which at least eighteen 
must be chosen from courses numbered 200 or higher and must 
include German 251-252 and 355-356. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign 

language 1 2 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or the 400 group from 

another foreign language 6 credits 



Greek 113 

Language 381 382, Origin and Development of 

Language 6 credits 

History 321-322, European History from 325 to 

1 648 6 credits 

German 151-152. Beginning German. For students offering fewer than two 
units in high school German. Fundamentals of grammar, composition, con- 
versation, and reading. Five periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 

German 153-154. Intermediate German. Prerequisite: German 151-152 or 
two to three units of high school German. Grammar review and conversation; 
reading of modern German texts. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. 
Brenner. 

German 251-252. German Classicism. Prerequisite: German 153-154 or four 
units in high school German. An intensive study of the literature of the 
eighteenth century. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 

German 351-352. Goethe and His Time. Prerequisite: German 251-252. A 
study of Goethe's work and influence. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 

German 355-356. History of German Literature from Earliest Time to 
Classicism. Prerequisite: German 153-154 or four units in high school Ger- 
man. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

German 451-452. Nineteenth Century Literature. Prerequisite: German 
251-252. Lectures, readings, and reports. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 

German v 455-456. Modern Drama and Fiction. Prerequisite: German 251- 
252 and at^least one other advanced course in German. Drama and fiction of 
the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 



GREEK 

Associate Professor C. W. Stewart 
Assistant Professor Voelkel 

Greek 131-132. Elementary Greek. Xenophon; New Testament; Greek civili- 
zation. Five periods a week. Six credits. Mrs. Stewart. 

Greek 133-134. Intermediate Greek. Prerequisite: Greek 131-132. Xenophon; 
Homer's Iliad; Homeric civilization; Plato. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
Dr. Voelkel. 

Greek 231-232. Herodotus, Homer's Odyssey, Thucydides. Prerequisite: Greek 
133-134. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Greek 331-332. Greek Theatre and Drama. Prerequisite: Greek 133-134. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Greek 431-432. Greek Orators, Lyric Poets, Lucian. Prerequisite: Greek 133- 
134. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 



ii4 Mary Washington College 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, 
AND HEALTH SERVICE 

Professor Read 

Associate Professor Leonard 

Assistant Professors Arnold, Hoye 

Instructors Bell, Hubbell*, Walther, Woosley, Shelton 
College Physician Dr. Rose 

Resident Nurses Trible, Thomas, Curtis 

A major program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation is designed for 
young women interested in careers in this important field. It rep- 
resents an area of collegiate study that offers lasting satisfaction 
and benefits to those who select it as a major. Students who wish 
to prepare for teaching may elect the necessary courses to qualify 
for the Collegiate Professional Certificate, the highest teaching 
certificate issued in Virginia. 

In order to meet the requirements for this degree, students 
should follow the requirements for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree but take as their major program the following distribution 
of thirty-six semester hours in health, physical education, and 
recreation: 

Twenty-four of these credits must be: Semester 

Physical Education 351-352, History and Principles of Hrs. 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 4 

Physical Education 451, Organization and Administra- 
tion of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 2 
Physical Education 441, Applied Physiology and 

Kinesiology 4 

Recreation 231, Community Recreation 2 

Health Education 402, Advanced Health Education...... 2 

Health Education 251, First Aid 2 

Physical Education Activities— Sports, Dance, Aquatics 8 

♦Absent on leave, 1952-53. 



Health, Physical Education 115 

The additional credits are to be taken in courses selected from 
the following: 

Biology 337-338, Anatomy and Physiology 8 

Recreation 232, Camp Leadership 1 

Health Education 252, Safety and Driver Education 2 

Physical Education 421-422, History and Theory of 

Dance 2 

Physical Education 405-406, Techniques of Officiating 

and Coaching 2 

Physical Education Activities— Sports, Aquatics, and 

Choreography 2 

The college also offers a Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Therapy. (See pp. 89-90 for outline of requirements.) 

Students should note the following departmental requirements 
and recommendations: 

1. Six credits in physical education, two of which must be in 
Health Education 100, Hygiene, are required for a degree. 
Courses taken to satisfy degree requirements cannot be counted 
also as a part of the major program. College credit in physical 
education for students not majoring in this field is limited to four 
hours of credit in activity courses and two hours of credit in 
Health Education. Students are expected to complete the required 
courses in physical education during their first two college 
years. 

2. Unless excused by the college physician, every student 
must pass a swimming test or complete Physical Education 115. 

3. Students who are excused from regular physical education 
classes by the college physician are required to participate in 
some modified physical education activity. Such students shall 
arrange their physical education work in consultation with the 
head of the department. 

4. No more than two of the six credits in physical education 
required for graduation may be taken in Equitation. 

5. So that a student may enjoy a varied and balanced physical 
education program it is recommended that she arrange her work 
to include one team sport, one individual sport, one rhythmic 



n6 Mary Washington College 

activity, and one intermediate or advanced course in any of these 
activities. 

6. Students should not purchase physical education costumes 
or equipment before receiving instructions from the department. 

A. Health Education 

Health Education 100. Hygiene. One period a week for the session. Two 
credits. Required of all freshmen. Staff. 

Health Education 251. First Aid. Two periods a week. First semester. Two 
credits. Miss Leonard. 

Health Education 252. Safety and Driver Education. The organization of 
safety instruction in elementary and secondary schools, including home 
safety, water safety, fire prevention, accident prevention in physical education 
activities, school and shop safety, traffic safety, and driver education. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Second semester. Miss Arnold. 

Health Education 402. Advanced Health Education. Two periods a week. 
Second semester. Two credits. Miss Leonard. 

B. Physical Education 

Physical Education 101. Beginning Field Hockey. Three periods a week. 
One credit. First semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Arnold. 

Physical Education 102. Beginning Basketball. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 103. Beginning Volleyball. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 104. Beginning Softball. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Bell, Miss Shelton. 

Physical Education 105. Beginning Soccer, Speedball, and Fieldball. Three 
periods a week. One credit. First semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Leonard, Miss 
Shelton. 

Physical Education 106. Games. Three periods a week. One credit. First 
semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Arnold, Miss Shelton. 

Physician Education 107. Gymnastics, Stunts, and Tumbling. Three periods 
a week. One credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Leonard, Miss Shelton. 

Physical Education 108. Recreational Sports. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 109. Beginning Badminton. Three periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 110. Beginning Tennis. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 111. Beginning Golf. Two double periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Woosley, Miss Arnold. 

Physical Education 112. Beginning Bowling. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Woosley, Miss Arnold. 

Physical Education 113. Beginning Archery. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Bell, Miss Shelton. 

Physical Education 114. Beginning Fencing. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Hubbell. 

Physical Education 115. Beginning Swimming. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $4.50. Staff. 



Health, Physical Education 117 

Physical Education 120. Fundamentals of Rhythm. Three periods a week. 
One credit. First semester. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

Physical Education 121. Folk Dancing and Singing Games. Three periods 
a week. One credit. First semester. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

Physical Education 122. Ballet. Two double periods a week. One credit. 
Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. Offered in alternate years. 

Physical Education 123. Beginning Social Dance. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Bell, Mrs. Read, Miss Shelton. 

Physical Education 124. Beginning Modern Dance. Three periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

*Physical Education 130. Beginning Equitation. Two double periods a 
week. One credit. Offered both semesters. $80.00.** Mr. Walther. 

Physical Education 140. Corrective Physical Education. Three periods a 
week. One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Hoye. 

Physical Education 201. Intermediate Hockey. Three periods a week. One 
credit. First semester. Fee, $3.00. Miss Arnold. 

Physical Education 202. Intermediate Basketball. Three periods a week. 
One credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 210. Intermediate Tennis. Two double periods a week. 
Offered both semesters. Fee, 3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 211. Intermediate Golf. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Woosley. 

Physical Education 212. Intermediate Bowling. Two double periods a week. 
Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Arnold, Miss Woosley. 

Physical Education 213. Intermediate Archery. Three periods a week. 
Offered both semesters. One credit. Fee, $3.00. Miss Bell. 

Physical Education 215. Intermediate Swimming. Three periods a week. 
Offered both semesters. One credit. Fee, $4.50. Staff. 

Physical Education 220. Tap Dance. Three periods a week. One credit. 
Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

Physical Education 221. Folk and National Dances. Three periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 224. Intermediate Modern Dance. Three periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

*Physical Education 230. Intermediate Equitation. Two double periods a 
week. One credit. Fee, $80.00.** Mr. Walther. 

Physical Education 240. Intermediate Corrective Physical Education. Three 
periods a week. One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Hoye. 

Physical Education 302. Advanced Basketball. Three periods a week. One 
credit. Second semester. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 310. Advanced Tennis. Two double periods a week. One 
credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Physical Education 315. Advanced Swimming. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $4.50. Miss Woosley, Miss Leonard. 

*Written permission of parent or guardian must be presented before enrollment 
in this course may be completed. Each student will have an opportunity to ride in both 
the Gymkhana and the Annual Horse Show. 

**Riding for recreation, without credit, one hour a week each semester, fee, $27.50. 
Two hours a week, fee, $47.50. 



n8 Mary Washington College 



Physical Education 321. American Folk and Square Dances. Three periods 
a week. One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Bell, Mrs. Read. 

Physical Education 324. Advanced Modern Dance. Two double periods a 
week. One credit. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. Read. 

*Physical Education 330. Advanced Equitation. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $80.00.** Mr. Walther. 

Physical Education 340. Advanced Corrective Physical Education. Three 
periods a week. One credit. Offered both semesters. Fee, $3.00. Miss Hoye. 

Physical Education 351-352. History and Principles of Health and Physical 
Education and Recreation. Prerequisites: Recreation 231, Community Rec- 
reation, and Recreation 232, Campcraft and Camp Leadership. This course 
presents the historical developments, viewpoints for present-day trends, and 
philosophies for health, physical education, and recreation in relation to com- 
munity living. Two periods a week for the session. Four credits. Miss Leonard. 

Physical Education 405-406. Techniques of Officiating and Coaching. Pre- 
requisite: permission of the instructor. This course presents a workshop for 
the technical analysis and practice of officiating and coaching sports activities. 
Three periods a week for the session. Two credits. Staff. 

Physical Education 415. Life Saving and Water Safety. Two double periods 
a week. One credit. Second semester. Fee, $4.50. Miss Leonard. 

Physical Education 421-422. History and Theory of the Dance. Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. This course presents a history, appreciation, and 
critical analysis of all forms of dance as related to the needs of every day 
living. Three periods a week for the session. Two credits. Mrs. Read. (Not 
offered in 1953.54.) 

Physical Education 423-424. Problems in Choreography. Two double periods 
a week for the session. Two credits. Mrs. Read. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Physical Education 441-442. Applied Physiology and Kinesiology. Prereq- 
uisite: Biology 337-338, Anatomy and Physiology. This course includes the 
application of basic scientific and physiological principles to the study of the 
human body as a mechanism for movement. Four single periods a week. 
Four credits each semester. Miss Hoye. 

Physical Education 451. Organization and Administration of Health, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation. Prerequisite: Physical Education 351 and 352, 
History and Principles of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. This 
course presents the organization and administration of health, physical edu- 
cation, and recreation in community centers and education departments. 
Two periods a week. Two credits. First semester. Miss Leonard. 

See, also, Biology 337-338, Anatomy and Physiology. 

C. Recreation 

Recreation 231. Community Recreation. Prerequisites: Physical Education 
108, 121. This course presents the foundations of organized recreation for 
community and civic leaders. Two periods a week. Two credits. First semester. 
Miss Leonard. 

Recreation 232. Camp Leadership. This course presents the fundamentals 
and practice of camping and camp leadership. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Second semester. Miss Shelton. Open to non-major students as an 
activity course. Fee, $3.00. 



History 119 

HISTORY 

Professors Darter, Lindsey, Hilldrup, Quenzel, Keith 

Associate Professor Mooney 

Assistant Professors R. E. Sumner, Voelkel, Caverlee 

Students who choose a major program in history must earn 
thirty-six credits in history and related subjects, in addition to 
the six credits required of all students. Twenty-four of these 
credits are to be taken in history, and must include the following 
courses: 

History 101-102, History of Civilization 

History 211-212, Modern and Contemporary European His- 
tory 

It is recommended that students who plan to major in history 
take History 101-102, History of Civilization, before taking His- 
tory 201-202, American History, which is required of all students. 

The remaining twelve required credits should be taken in two 
of the following related fields: introductory economics, American 
government, principles of sociology including social problems, 
and geography. Selection of these fields should be made in con- 
sultation with memebrs of the Department of History. 

History 101-102. History of Civilization. An introductory survey of the origin 
and development of civilization— ancient, medieval, and modern. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. Staff. 

History 201-202. American History. A survey of the history of the United 
States from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis upon economic and 
social aspects and the evolution of American democracy. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Staff. 

History 211-212. Modern and Contemporary European History. A survey of 
the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, development of national- 
ism, democracy, imperialism; effects of these forces in modern European 
history. Three periods a weeke. Six credits. Required of all history majors. Dr. 
Darter. 

History 221. History of Religions. History, development, and influence of 
the religions of mankind studied chronologically with attention to racial 
characteristics revealed in religious life. Three periods a week for the first 
semester. Three credits. (Not credited toward major in history.) Dr. Caverlee. 

History 301-302. English History. A general survey of English history from 
earliest records to the present. Emphasis upon the economic and constitu- 
tional phases and growth of the Britsh Empire. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Lindsey. 



120 Mary Washington College 

History 321-322. European History from 325 to 1648. The disintegration of 
the Roman Empire, formation of modern states, the Renaissance, the Refor- 
mation, and the Counter Reformation movements. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953- 
54.) Dr. Hilldrup. 

History 331-332. Culture of the Ancient Mediterranean World. The Near 
East, Greece, Rome. Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each 
semester. Dr. Voelkel. 

History 341-342. Latin American History. Colonial institutions, the inde- 
pendence movement, development of the modern states, Pan-American Union, 
and other international problems. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. Dr. Sumner. 

History 351-352. History of the South. A comprehensive study of Virginia, 
the Old South, the New South, their problems and institutions. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. Dr. Hilldrup. 

History 355. The West in American History. Lectures and discussions on 
the Westward movement and the significance of the frontier. Three periods 
a week for the first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not 
offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Lindsey. 

History 356. Recent American History. A survey of United States history 
from 1900 to the present, with special attention to the economic and social 
changes. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Lindsey. 

History 361. Proseminar: Historiography and Research Methods. This course 
is recommended for all history majors who plan to do graduate work in 
history; it is optional for other history majors. Three periods a week for the 
first semester. Three credits. Dr. Quenzel. 

History 371-372. Oriental History. History of China, India, and Japan and 
their relationship with Western civilization; the Middle and Near East cul- 
tures and peoples. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

History 381-382. Current Affairs. A study of national and international prob- 
lems in their world setting. Two periods a week. Four credits. Staff. 

History 401-402. Economic Development of Modern Europe. (See Economics 
451-452.) 

History 411-412. Economic Development of the United States. (See Economics 
211-212.) 

History 421-422. Constitutional History of the United States. A study of the 
origin and growth of constitutional principles and practices in American 
history. The history of the Federal Constitution is emphasized the first semes- 
ter and the leading cases in constitutional law the second semester. Credit 
given for first semester without the second, but the first semester is prereq- 
uisite for second semester. Three periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. See Political Science 301-302. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953- 
54.) Dr. Sumner. 

History 431-432. Diplomatic History of the United States. A study of the 
foreign relations of the United States from the colonial period to the present. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 
1953-54.) Dr. Sumner. 

History 441-442. Social and Intellectual History of the United States. A 

survey of the transplanting of European peoples and their social and cultural 
institutions to the New World, the modification and development of these 
institutions, and the emergence of American forms of life and thought from 



Home Economics 121 

colonial times to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in 
alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Hilldrup. 

History 481-482. History of Russia. A survey of Russian history from the 
earliest times to the present day. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Not 
offered in 1953-54.) 

History 492. Seminar: Special Studies in History. The techniques in histori- 
cal research and their application to special problems. Three periods a week 
for the second semester. Three credits. Dr. Darter, Dr. Hilldrup, Dr. Lindsey. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Beeler 

Associate Professor Harrison 

Instructors Harris, Cates 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics is 
awarded to students who complete a major in one of the following 
areas in the field: Foods and Nutrition; Clothing and Textiles; 
Family Life and Teaching Vocational Home Economics. 

A major program in home economics requires thirty-six semes- 
ter hours' credit in home economics and related fields. Twelve 
credits must be selected from related courses in art, biology, 
chemistry, economics, and psychology, chosen in consultation 
with a member of the Home Economics Department. 

Suggested plan for majors in the area of Foods and Nutrition: 

Freshman Year 

1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem. 

English 111-112. Comp. and Reading 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics 161-162. Mathematical Concepts 3 3 

Chemistry 111-115. Gen. and Org. Chem 4 4 

Health Education 100, Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 



15 15 



Sophomore Year 



English 211-212, Sur. of Eng. Lit 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Biology 121-122, Gen. Biology _ 4 4 

Chemistry 217. Biological Chemistry 4 — 

Economics 221, Accounting — 3 

Home Ec. 221-222. Foods: Selection and Preparation 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 17 



122 



Mary Washington College 



Junior Year 

Biology 371. Bacteriology 4 

Psychology 201-202. Gen. Psychology 3 

History 201-202. American History 3 

Education 331. Principles of Teaching Home Economics 3 
Home Ec. 338. Experimental Work in Food 

Preparation — 

Home Ec. 336. Child Care - 

Biology 382. Physiology .... - 

Elective 3 



Senior Year 
Home Ec. 421-422. Family Nutrition and 

Problems in Nutrition 

Home Ec. 423-424. Institutional Management and 

Economics 

Sociology 201-202. Principles and Problems 

Home Ec. 432. Family Relations 

Elective — 

Economics 201-202. Principles and Problems 



16 



3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



16 



3 
3 
3 

3 

15 



Suggested plan for majors in the area of Clothing and Textiles: 
Freshman Year 



English 111-112. Composition and Reading .... 

Foreign Language 

Mathematics 161-162. Mathematical Concepts 

History 201-202. American History 

Art 101-102. Drawing and Design 

Home Ec. 112. Clothing Selection 

Health Education 100. Hygiene . — 

Physical Education „ 



Sophomore Year 

English 211-212. Survey of Eng. Literature — 

Foreign Language 

Art 111-112. Art Appreciation „~ 

Chemistry 111-115. General and Org. Chem. 

Home Ec. 211-212. Personal and Family Clothing 
Physical Education 



1st. Sem. 
„„ 3 
_ 3 

- 3 

- 3 
_ 2 

I i 
_ 1 

16 



2nd. Sem, 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



18 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 



17 



Junior Year 
Psychology 201-202. Gen. Psychology 



Home Ec. 311. Tailoring, and H. Ec. 312. Textiles ~~ 
Home Ec. 333-334. Household Equipment and Home 

Decoration 

Economics 201-202. Principles and Problems 

Electives _... „ 



17 



15 



15 



Home Economics 123 

Senior Year 

Home Ec. 432. Family Relations „ „ — 3 

Sociology 201-202. Principles and Problems 3 3 

Home Ec. 331. Home Management Economics ~ 3 — 

Speech 231-232. Effective Speech 3 3 

Economics 311-312. Marketing Economics 3 3 

Psychology 301-302. Social Psychology 3 3 

15 15 

Suggested plan for majors in the area of Family Life: 

Freshman Year 

1st. Sem. 2nd. Sent. 

English 111-112. Composition and Reading — 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics 161-162. Mathematical Concepts 3 3 

Chemistry 111-115. General and Org. Chem — 4 4 

Health Education 100. Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Home Ec. 112. Clothing Selection — _ — 2 

15 17 

Sophomore Year 

English 211-212. Eng. Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language — 3 3 

History 201-202. American History „ 3 3 

Biology 121-122. General Biology „ 4 4 

Home Ec. 211-212. Personal and Family Clothing ...... 3 3 

Physical Education „ „ 1 1 



17 17 



Junior Year 

Psychology 201-202. General Psychology 

Home Ec. 221-222. Foods: Selection and Preparation 

Biology 371. Bacteriology 

Home Ec. 333-334. Household Equipment and 

Home Decoration ~. 

Sociology 201-202. Principles and Problems 

Home Ec. 336. Child Care 



3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


— 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 



16 15 



Senior Year 

Home Ec. 421. Family Nutrition _ 3 — 

Home Ec. 432. Family Relations _ — 3 

Economics 201-202. Principles and Problems ...~ 3 3 

Home Ec. 331. Home Management Economics 3 — 

Home Ec. 400. Home Management Residence — 4 

Education 331-332. Principles of Teaching 

Home Economics ~ 3 3 

Electives .._ .'. «.- ~. - — 3 3 

15 16 



124 Mary Washington College 

Suggested plan for majors in the area of Teaching Vocational Home 
Economics: 

Freshman Year 

1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem. 

English 111-112. Composition and Reading 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics 161-162. Mathematical Concepts . — 3 3 

Chemistry 111-115. General and Org. Chem 4 4 

Art 101. Drawing and Design 2 — 

Home Economics 112. Clothing Selection — 2 

Health Education 100. Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education ~ 1 1 



17 17 



Sophomore Year 



English 211-212. English Literature „ 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Biology 121-122. General and Bacteriological 3 3 

Home Ec. 221-222. Foods: Selection and Preparation 3 3 

Home Ec. 211-212. Personal and Family Clothing ...... 3 3 

Physical Education .. 1 1 



16 16 



Junior Year 



Psychology 321-345. Child Psychology and 

Psychology of Learning 3 3 

History 201-202. American History 3 3 

Education 331-332. Principles of Teaching 

Home Economics 3 3 

Home Ec. 335-336. Family Health, Child Care 2 3 

Home Ec. 333. Household Equipment 3 — 

Home Ec. 338. Experimental Work in Food Preparation — 3 

Home Ec. 311. Tailoring 3 

Home Ec. 334. Home Decoration — 3 



17 18 



Senior Year 



Home Ec. 432. Family Relations — 

Philosophy 411-412. History of Philosophy 

of Education 6 or 

Education 440. Supervised Teaching in Home 

Economics 6 or 

Home Economics 331. Home Management Economics 3 

Home Economics 400. Home Management Residence 4 or 

Electives: 

Sociology 202. Social Problems 

Economics 201. Principles of Economics 

Public Speaking, Art Appreciation, Journalism 



Home Economics 125 

Twenty-four or more credits must be selected from the follow- 
ing Home Economics courses: 

Home Economics 112. Clothing Selection. A study of color and line in 
dress as adapted to individual build, coloring, and personality. Ensembles 
for different occasions. One single period and one double period a week for 
the second semester. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 211. Personal Clothing. The economic, social, and physical 
aspects of a college girl's wardrobe. Construction of clothing for self. One 
single and two double periods a week. Three credits, first semester. Fee, $3.50. 
Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 212. Family Clothing. An analysis of wardrobe needs for 
individual family members. Construction of garments for the various age 
groups within the family. One single and two double periods a week. Three 
credits, first semester. Fee, $3.50. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 221-222. Foods Selection and Preparation. Elements of 
nutrition with reference to the nutritive needs of individuals. Food economics 
and fundamental principles of food preparation and service. One single 
and two double periods a week. Three credits each semester. Fee, $7.50 each 
semester. Mrs. Harris. 

Home Economics 231-232. Foods and Nutrition. For cooperative nursing 
program. Principles of human nutrition, with emphasis on the importance 
of food as a factor in health; selection and preparation of foods to meet 
the needs of the individual and family, and of hospital patients. Two 
the needs of the individual and family, and of hospital patients. One single 
and two double periods a week first semester; two single periods a week 
second semester. Five credits for the session. Fee, $7.50 for first semester. No 
fee second semester. Mrs. Harris. 

Home Economics 311. Tailoring. Prerequisite: Home Economics 112 and 
211-212. Applied dress design and standards for women's tailored garments. 
One single and two double periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. Fee, $4.00. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 312. Textiles. The study and analysis of the fiber, yarns, 
weaves, and finishes in relation to fabric. Suitability of fabrics for different 
uses. Two single and one double period a week for the second semester. 
Three credits. Fee, $4.00. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 331. Home Management Economics. Objectives of home- 
making. Management of time, energy, and money in relation to family 
needs. Standards of living, community resources, family income and patterns 
of expenditures. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 
Miss Beeler. 

Home Economics 333. Household Equipment. Problems in selection, use, 
and care of electrical and non-electrical household equipment. Evaluation of 
lighting and wiring plans. Two double periods and one single period for the 
first semester. Fee, $4.00. Miss Harrison. 

Home Economics 334. Home Decoration. Application of art principles to 
the furnishing and decorating of the home. Two single and one double 
period a week for the second semester. Three credits. Fee, $4.00. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 335. Family Health. Guidance in meeting family prob- 
lems concerning promotion and maintenance of health and care during ill- 
ness. Two periods a week for the first semester. Two credits. Fee, $2.00. Miss 
Harrison. 

Home Economics 336. Child Care. Physical, mental, and social develop- 
ment of the child, with emphasis on care and guidance. Observation and study 



126 Mary Washington College 



of the pre-school children. Two single and one double period a week for 
the second semester. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. Miss Harrison. 

Home Economics 338. Experimental Work in Food Preparation. Prereq- 
uisite: Home Economics 221-222. The application of experimental methods 
to problems involved in the preparation of foods. A continuation of the 
evaluation of food products. One single and two double periods a week for 
the second semester. Three credits. Fee, $7.50. Mrs. Harris. 

Home Economics 400. Home Management Residence. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 331. Experience in group living; applying the objectives of home 
management and economics; development of individual and group schedules; 
meal planning; service and marketing at different economic levels; care of 
the house, its furnishings and equipment; experience in planning and direct- 
ing the social life of the group. Six weeks residence in the Home Manage- 
ment House. Four credits. Fee. $5.00. Miss Beeler. 

Home Economics 413. Dress Design. Prerequisite: Home Economics 112 and 
211-212. A creative approach to dressmaking based on original or adapted 
design. One single and two double periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. Fee, $4.00. Miss Cates. 

Home Economics 421-422. Family Nutrition and Problems in Nutrition. 

Nutritional needs of the individual and of the family group. The normal 
diet and its modification to meet the demands of abnormal conditions. Survey 
of nutrition research in general nutrition, child nutrition, and diet in disease. 
Two single and one double period a week. Three credits each semester. Fee, 
$4.00 each semester. Mrs. Harris. 

Home Economics 423-424. Institutional Management and Economics. Prob- 
lems, theory, and practice of institutional management relative to personnel, 
types of work, quantity production of foods, schedule, and dispatching of 
work. Institutional buying and accounting, renewal costs, and care of equip- 
ment. Three single periods a week for the first semester and three double 
periods a week for the second semester. Six credits for the session. Staff. 

Home Economics 432. Family Relations. Marriage and the family in our 
social order: factors contributing to marital success or failure; relationships 
between parents and children, brothers and sisters. The family life span 
from birth to old age. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. Miss Beeler. 

Home Economics 441. Consumer Education. Problems involved in the 
selection and purchase of goods and services required by individuals and 
families. Sources of information; governmental and other agencies serving 
the consumers; social responsibilities of consumers. Three periods a week 
for the first semester. Three credits. Miss Beeler. 

See, also, Education 331-332, Principles of Teaching Home Economics. 

ITALIAN 

Professor Cabrera 
Assistant Professor Greene 

Italian 161-162. Beginning Italian. For students who enter college with 
fewer than two units of high school Italian. Fundamentals of grammar and 
pronunciation; reading and conversation. Five periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Greene. 

Italian 163-164. Intermediate Italian. Prerequisite: Italian 161-162 or two 
units in high school Italian. A review of grammatical principles; reading of 



Latin 127 

selected texts, collateral reading. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Greene. 

Italian 261-262. Nineteenth Century Literature. Prerequisite: Italian 163- 
164. Readings from Italian literature with emphasis on the novel and drama 
of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Greene. 

Italian 361-362. Early Italian Literature. Prerequisite: Italian 163-164. Clas- 
sical Italian literature, especially the works of Dante and the lyric poets of 
the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
(Not offered in 1953-54.) 



LATIN 

Associate Professor C. W. Stewart 

Assistant Professor Voelkel 

Students who select a major program in Latin must take thirty- 
six credits in Latin and related subjects. These credits are to be 
distributed in the following manner: 

1. Twenty-four credits in Latin, including Latin 211-212 
(Livy, Tacitus, and Horace) and three courses in Latin selected 

from the 300 group and the 400 group. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 

Art 385-386, Art and Archaeology 6 credits 

History 331-332, Culture of the Ancient Mediter- 
ranean World 6 credits 

Language 381-382, Origin and Development of 

Language 6 credits 

Greek 133-134, Intermediate Greek 6 credits 

Any other foreign language course from the 200, 

300, or 400 groups 6 credits 

Latin 111-112. Elementary Latin. For students wro enter college with fewer 
than two units in high school Latin. The essentials of Latin grammar and 
composition; translations from Caesar and other writers of prose. Five periods 
a week. Six credits. Mrs. Stewart. 

Latin 113-114. Intermediate Latin. Prerequisite: Latin 111-112 or two units 
in high school Latin. Cicero's Orations: Vergil's Aeneid; grammar and 
composition. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mrs. Stewart. 

Latin 115-116. Medieval Latin. Prerequisite: Latin 111-112 or at least two 
units in high school Latin. Particularly intended for majors in French or 
Spanish. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mrs. Stewart. 

Latin 211-212. Survey of Latin Literature. Prerequisite: Latin 113-114 or 
four units in high school Latin. A survey of the great periods of Latin litera- 
ture with readings from the representative works in drama, poetry, histoy, 
and letters. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Voelkel. 



128 Mary Washington College 

Latin 311-312. Elegiac Poetry, Drama. Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Catullus, 
Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid; Plautus. Terence, and Seneca. Three periods 
a week. (Offered every third year. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Voelkel. 

Latin 315-316. Roman Historians, Roman Letter Writers. Prerequisite: 
Latin 211-212. Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, Pliny, St. Jerome. 
Three periods a week. (Offered every third year. Offered in 1953-54.) 

Latin 411-412. Roman Satire and Philosophy. Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. 
Phaedrus, Juvenal, Martial, and Horace's Satires; Lucretius. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered every third year. Not offered 
in 1953-54.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Carter, Frick 

Students who undertake a major program in mathematics are 
required to earn thirty-six credits in mathematics and related 
subjects. 

Twenty-four must be selected from the courses described below 
(except Mathematics 161-162, 361-362) and at least twelve must 
be earned in the following fields: 

Mathematics— Any 300 or 400 course undertaken in addition 

to the tweny-four credit requirement. 
Physics— Any course in physics. 
Astronomy— Any course in astronomy. 
Philosophy— Philosophy 301-302 or 312-322. 

Mathematics 111-112. Mathematical Analysis. The course includes college 
algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. Dr. Carter, Dr. Frick. 

Mathematics 161-162. Mathematical Concepts. A terminal course designed 
to give the student an understanding of the concepts of mathematics and 
an appreciation of its cultural value. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Frick. 

Mathematics 211-212. Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111-112. Dif- 
ferential and integral calculus. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Carter. 

Mathematics 341-342. Advanced Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211- 
212- Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate 
years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Frick. 

Mathematics 361-362. Statistics. Statistical measures including simple, par- 
tial, and multiple correlation both linear and non-linear; various types of 
curves and curve-fitting, special work in major field. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Dr. Frick. 

Mathematics 421-422. Higher Algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. 
Number theory, groups, fields, matrices, rings, ideals. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54). 
Dr. Carter. 



Music 129 

Mathematics 431-432. Higher Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. 
Basic ideas and methods of higher geometry; the geometries associated with 
the projective group of transformations; applications to affine and metric 
geometries. Three periods a week. Three credits each semesetr. (Offered 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Carter. 

Mathematics 451-452. Numerical and Graphical Analysis. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211-212. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54). Dr. Frick. 

MUSIC 

Associate Professors Eppes, Faulkner 

Assistant Professors Bulley, Chauncey, Lenhart, Houston 

Instructors Appel, Bassett, Hamer, Parlente, Ross 

The Department of Music offers a major program in music as 
well as courses that can be chosen as electives by students whose 
primary interests are in other fields. 

A major program requires that a student earn thirty-six credits 
in music and certain closely allied fields. Twenty-four of the re- 
quired credits must be taken in the following courses: 

Music 181-182, Sight Singing 2 credits 

Music 185-186, Harmony 4 credits 

Music 281-282, Harmony and Ear Training 6 credits 

Music 305-306, History of Music 4 credits 

Music 391-392, Counterpoint 4 credits 

Music 491-492, Form and Analysis 4 credits 

Twelve additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

Music 395-396, Orchestration 

Music 495-496, Composition 

Music 175-176; 275-276; 375-376; 475-476, Orchestral 

Instruments 
Music 405-406, Choral Music 
Music 415-416, Opera 
Music 421-422, Studies in Musical Style 

Dramatic arts and speech, foreign languages, the history and 
appreciation of art, and certain courses in applied music may 
also be considered allied fields in which the student may choose 
courses to earn the twelve additional required credits. However, 



130 Mary Washington College 

the student should plan her work in consultation with the head 
of the department. 

It is also possible for students to take courses in music in addi- 
tion to those required by the major program. These courses may 
be considered as electives in fulfilling degree requirements. 

Theory of Music 

Music 181-182. Sight Singing. Melodic and interval singing, rhythm, nota- 
tion, and part-singing. Two periods a week. Two credits. Miss Chauncey. 

Music 185-186. Harmony. Fundamentals of music, harmonization, simple 
modulations, dominant and diminished seventh chords, dominant ninth 
chords, ornamental figures, and dissonances. Assigned melodies and basses, 
and original work. Three periods a week. Four credits. Mr. Faulkner. 

Music 281-282. Harmony and Ear Training. Prerequisite: Music 181-182 and 
Music 185-186. Recognition of harmonic materials, including intervals, 
rhythm, chords, melodic and harmonic dictation, modulations, and themes 
from instrumental forms. Original harmonic work in composition and key- 
board harmony. Approach to counterpoint, hymn and short choral settings, 
piano accompaniments, and transposition. Assigned and original work. Five 
periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Faulkner. 

Music 301-302. School Music. Essentials of school music materials and pro- 
cedures involved in songs, appreciation, theory, rhythmic and instrumental 
work. Coordination with other subjects. This course is organized so that 
students interested in teaching in the elementary grades may enroll for one 
credit (Music 101-102), or for three credits as permitted by their programs. 
Three hours a week. Three credits each semester. (One hour a week. One 
credit each semester.) Miss Chauncey. 

Music 321-322. Conducting. Principles of conducting, technique of the 
baton, study of materials and programs. Onee period a week for the session. 
One credit each semester. 

Music 391-392. Counterpoint. Prerequisite or corequisite: Music 281-282. 
Creative writing in polyphonic style. Two periods a week. Four credits. Dr. 
Bulley. 

Music 395-396. Orchestration. Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: Music 391-392. Detailed study of building and performing or- 
chestral scores. Two periods a week. Four credits. Mr. Faulkner. 

Music 491-492. Form and Analysis. Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Structural 
and harmonic analysis of both large and small forms of composition. Two 
periods a week. Four credits. Dr. Bulley. 

Music 495-496. Composition. Prerequisite: Music 281-282 and Music 391- 
392. Creative work for piano, organ, voice, orchestral instruments, and choral 
and orchestral forms. Two periods a week. Four credits. Mr. Faulkner. 

History and Literature of Music 

Music 111-112. Survey of Music. Recognition and evaluation of musical 
literature. Three periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $6.00 for the session. Miss 
Eppes, Dr. Bulley, Miss Chauncey, Dr. Lenhart. 

Music 305-306. History of Music. Study of music in relation to world his- 
tory from ancient times to the present. Two periods a week. Four credits. 
Fee, $3.00 for the session. Miss Eppes. 



Music 131 

Music 405-406. Choral Music. Study of sacred and secular choral literature. 
Two periods a week. Four credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. (Offered in 
alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Miss Eppes. 

Music 415-416. Opera. Study of operatic literature. Two periods a week. 
Four credits. Fee, $3.00 for the session. (Offered in alternate years. Offered 
in 1953-54.) Miss Eppes. 

Music 421-422. Studies in Musical Style. Polyphony, sonata form and sym- 
phony, modern composition. Two periods a week. Four credits. Fee, $3.00 for 
the session. Dr. Bulley. 

Instrumental Ensembles 

Any student may, with the permission of the director, play in 

the band or orchestra, but will be allowed a maximum of four 

credits in Band and four in Orchestra. 

Music 121-122. Class Piano. Enrollment limited to students majoring in 
physical education. Two periods a week for the session. One credit each 
semester. Fee, $3.00 each semester. Mr. Houston. 

Music 161-162; 361-362. Band. Qualified players of band instruments are 
admitted for marching and concert work with or without credit. Uniforms 
are furnished free of charge. Two double periods a week. Two credits. Fee 
for use of college owned instruments, $9.00 for the session. Mr. Faulkner. 

Music 171-172; 371-372. Orchestra. Participation in the performance of 
symphonic and standard music. Three double periods a week. Two credits. 
Fee for use of college owned instruments, $9.00 for the session. Mr. Faulkner. 

Music 175-176; 275-276; 375-376; 475-476. Orchestral Instruments. Class study 
of instruments of the band and orchestra. Two periods a week. One credit 
for the session. Fee for the use of college owned instruments, $9.00 for the 
session. Mr. Faulkner. 

Choral Ensembles 
With the permission of the director, any student may sing in 
the Glee Club or the Choir, but will be allowed a maximum of 
two credits in either Glee Club or Choir. Each organization 
meets for one double period a week. Students who sing in either 
club are granted one credit a session. However, either Glee Club 
or Choir may be taken without credit. 

Applied Music 

Individual lessons in voice, panio, organ, violin, viola, violon- 
cello, contrabass, harp, flute, clarinet, and other instruments are 
offered by the department. 

Credit is allowed for a maximum of twelve semester hours in 
applied music; the number of credits a student earns in applied 
music must be matched by an equal number of credits in courses 
in the theory of music. However, courses in applied music may be 
taken without credit. 



132 Mary Washington College 

Students may earn from one to three credits each semester in 
each course in applied music. 

For study of above named applied music subjects one credit is 
allowed for one half-hour lesson a week plus one hour of practice 
daily; two credits are allowed for one one-hour lesson or two 
half -hour lessons a week plus two hours of practice daily; three 
credits are allowed for one one-hour or two half-hour lessons a 
week plus three hours of practice daily. 

The fee for individual instruction in applied music is $48.00 
each semester for one credit; $75.00 each semester for two or 
three credits in the same subject. A practice fee of $4.50 each 
semester is charged students of voice, piano, and organ for the 
use of college owned instruments. 

Instructors in applied music are: Mrs. Anne Hamer, concert 
artist of Washington, D. C, violoncello and piano; Mrs. Vera 
Neely Ross, concert artist and choir director of Washington, 
D. C, voice; Mrs. Jean Slater Appel, concert organist of Wash- 
ington, D. C, organ; Mr. Levin Houston, past president of the 
Virginia Music Teachers Association, piano; Dr. Charmenz S. 
Lenhart, violin and viola; Mr. Richard Bassett, graduate of the 
Cincinnati Conservatory of Music and the Jordan College of 
Music, woodwinds; Mr. Carmen Parlante, with the National 
Symphony Orchestra, brass instruments; and Miss Eva Taylor 
Eppes, head of the Music Department, Mary Washington Col- 
lege, voice. 

See, also, special announcement of the Summer School of 
Music. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professors Alvey, Parkinson 

Associate Professor Graves 

Assistant Professor Leidecker 

A major program in philosophy requires thirty-six credits in 
philosophy and related fields of study. 

Twenty-four of these required credits must be earned in courses 
in philosophy; twelve credits must be earned in courses in the 
fields of Greek, Latin, psychology, mathematics, sociology, and 



Physics 133 

science selected in consultation with the head of the Department 
of Philosophy. 

Philosophy 201-202. Introduction to Philosophy. A study of the theory of 
knowledge, cosmological enquiries, entological enquiries, philosophical sys- 
tems, and life values. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Graves. Dr. 
Leidecker. 

Philosophy 301-302. History of Philosophy. A study of the development of 
philosophy from 600 B. C. in Greece to the present. Three periods a weeek. 
Six credits. Dr. Graves. 

Philosohy 311. Ethics. An enquiry into the basis and origins of morality. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Dr. Graves. 

Philosophy 312. Logic and Scientific Method. The elementary principles of 
valid reasoning, both deductive and inductive, with illustration from the 
methods of science. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. 
Dr. Graves. 

Philosophy 322. Aesthetics. A study of the philosophy of art, the canons of 
beauty, the various fields of art, individual differences in appreciation, and 
certain art movements. Three periods a week for second semester. Three 
credits. Dr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 331. Oriental Philosophy. An introduction to the philosophies 
of India, China, and Japan in comparison with those of the West. Three 
periods a week for first semester. Three credits. Dr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 411-412. History and Philosophy of Education. A study of 
development and theories of education and the philosophical rationale 
underlying each; current educational tendencies as related to social and 
psychological needs. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Parkinson. 

Philosophy 421-422. Classical Philosophers. A study of selected classical 
philosophers with readings from their works. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. 
Leidecker. 

Philosophy 431-432. Contemporary Philosophy. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. Dr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 441-442. Political Theory and Philosophy. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 

PHYSICS 

Assistant Professor Burns 

Physics 201-202. General Physics. An introductory course in heat, light, 
electricity, sound, and mechanics. One double and three single periods a 
week. Eight credits. Fee, $15.00 for the session. Mr. Burns. 

Physics 301-302. Atomic Physics. Prerequisite: Physics 201-202 and Mathe- 
matics 111-112. A study of the modern theories of the structure of matter, 
spectroscopy, X-rays and crystal structure, thermionic and photo-electric ef- 
fects, natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear physics. Three single periods 
and one double period a week. Eight credits. Mr. Burns. 

Physics 391-392. Electricity and Magnetism. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211- 
212 and Physics 201-202. Three single periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $10.00 
for the session. Mr. Burns. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Physics 471-472. Mechanics and Heat. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 



134 Mary Washington College 

and Physics 201-202. Three single periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $10.00 for 
the session. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Physics 481-482. Sound and Optics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 and 
Physics 201-202. Three single periods a week. Six credits. Fee, $10.00 for the 
session. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Darter 

Assistant Professors Sublette, R. E. Sumner 

Students who select a major program in this field must take 
thirty-credits in political science and related subjects. Twenty- 
four of these credits are to be taken in political science and must 
include Political Science 201-202, American Government. The 
remaining twelve credits are to be elected from the related fields 
of economics, sociology, and history, with the approval of the 
Department of Political Science. American History 201-202 must 
be included in the program of political science majors. 

Political Science 201. American National Government. Principles of gov- 
ernment and politics with special application to the federal constitution and 
national administration. Three periods a week. Three credits. Dr. Sublette. 

Political Science 202. State and Local Government. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Dr. Sublette. 

Political Science 301-302. Constitutional History of the United States. A 

history of the Federal constitution with a study of the leading cases in con- 
stitutional law. Proposals for constitutional revision. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. (Same as History 421422.) (Offered in alternate years. Offered 
in 1953-54.) Dr. Sumner. 

Political Science 311-312. Public Administration. A study of the administra- 
tive aspects of modern government, problems of organizational structure, 
buget and fiscal control, and administrative responsibility. Three periods a 
week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. 
Sumner. 

Political Science 321-322. History of Political Thought. A survey of the 
works of ancient, medieval, and modern political philosophers with emphasis 
on approaches to current problems. Three periods a week. Six credit. Dr. 
Sublette. 

Political Science 331-332. International Law. The principles of public 
international law. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in alternate 
years. Offered in 1953-54.) 

Political Science 401-402. International Relations. A study of the political, 
economic, and racial factors in modern international society, and of the 
agencies established to promote world peace. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Darter. 

Political Science 411-412. Government and Business. (See Economics 411- 
412.) 

Political Science 421-422. Comparative Government. Attention to the prin- 
ciples and forms of government in general, and of the origin and character 



Portuguese 135 

of contemporary major governments of the world. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Political Science 431. Propaganda and Politics. A study of the methods 
and devices used by pressure groups to influence public opinion and legis- 
lation; the recognition and evaluation of propaganda. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Political Science 492. Seminar. Individual study and investigation of parti- 
cular topics in contemporary politics; selected readings and group discussion; 
personal conferences. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. Dr. Sublette. 

PORTUGUESE 

Professor Cabrera 

Portuguese 141-142. Beginning Portuguese. For students who enter college 
with fewer than two units in high school Portuguese. Grammar and readings; 
conversation based on the Brazilian pronunciation. Five periods a week. Six 
credits. Dr. Cabrera. 

Portuguese 143-144. Intermediate Portuguese. Prerequisite: Portuguese 141- 
142 or two to three units in high school Portuguese. A brief review of gram- 
mar; reading and discussion of modern Brazilian literature; conversation, 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Cabrera. 

Portuguese 241-242. Portuguese Literaturee. Prerequisite: Portuguese 143- 
144. A study of Portuguese literature with emphasis upon lyric poetry. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Portuguese 341-342. Brazilian Literature. Prerequisite: Portuguese 143-144. 
The literature and life of Brazil; reading and reports in Portuguese. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors E. K. Dodd, Parkinson, Erdelyi 

Associate Professor Graves 

Assistant Professor Klinesmith 

A major program in psychology requires thirty-six credits in 
psychology and related fields of study. 

Twenty-four of these required credits must be earned in 
courses in psychology selected by the student in consultation with 
a member of the department; twelve credits must be selected 
from the following related courses: 

Biology 121-122, General Biology 
Biology 441-442, Genetics and Eugenics 
Sociology 201-202, Principles of Sociology and Social 
Problems 



136 Mary Washington College 

Sociology 331, The Family; or Sociology 335, Marriage 

and the Family 
Sociology 401-402, Sociology of the Child. 

Child Welfare 
Economics 201-202, Economic Principles and Problems 
Economics 441-442, Comparative Economic Systems 
Political Science 201-202, American Government 
Political Science 431, Propaganda and Politics 
Mathematics 361-362, Statistics 
Any one course in Philosophy 

With the consent of the head of the Department of Psychology, 
students may offer certain other courses to fulfill departmental 
requirements concerning related work- 
See, also, suggested curriculum for students majoring in psy- 
chology who wish to qualify for teaching in the elementary 
grades. (Pages 107-108.) 

Psychology 201-202. General Psychology. Fundamental principles of human 
behavior; motivation; sensation; biological antecedents; perception; learning; 
intelligence; individual differences; and personality. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Fee, $4.00 for the session. Staff. 

Psychology 301-302. Social Psychology. Effects of the group upon individual 
and social behavior. A study of biological antecedents of social behavior; 
leadership; attitudes; propaganda; fads, fashion, crowds; suggestions; institu- 
tions and social conflict. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Erdelyi. 

Psychology 311-312. Mental Hygiene and Abnormal Psychology. First semes- 
ter; principles of mental health and the prevention of maladjustment. Second 
semester: abnormalities of sensation, perception, memory, thinking, emotion, 
intelligence, motor activity, and personality; neurotic and psychotic syn- 
dromes. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Miss Klinesmith. 

Psychology 321. Child Psychology. A study of the motor, mental, emotional 
and social growth of the child. Emphasis is placed upon personality develop- 
ment. Three periods a week. Three credits. Dr. E. K. Dodd. 

Psychology 322. Adolescent Psychology. Designed to present a comprehen- 
sive picture of adolescent development along all lines— social, physical, emo- 
tional, moral, and intellectual. Special emphasis is placed upon a study of 
the problems peculiar to adolescence. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Dr. Parkinson. 

Psychology 331-332. Child Development. A study of the normal develop- 
ment of the child. Emphasis is placed upon the emergence of personality in 
the dynamics of group relations. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Graves. 

Psychology 341. Applied Psychology. Psychological contributions in the 
fields of personal and industrial efficiency, consumer research, crime, and cer- 
tain professions. Three periods a week for first semester. Three credits. Dr. 
Erdelyi. 

Psychology 342. Psychology of Personality. A study of personality develop- 
ment, dynamics, testing, and theories. Three periods a week for second 
semester. Three credits. Dr. E. K. Dodd. 



Russian 137 

Psychology 343. Personnel Psychology. Psychological principles applied to 
problems of employment relationships, including the selection, placement, 
transfer, and promotion of employees; training procedures; merit rating; wage 
incentives; job analyses and job classifications. Three periods a week for sec- 
ond semester. Three credits. Dr. Erdelyi. 

Psychology 345. Psychology of Learning. A study of the results of psycholog- 
ical research in relation to the theories, major problems, and activities of 
learning. Three periods a week. Three credits. Dr. Parkinson. 

Psychological 401-402. Psychological Measurements. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 361. Theory of test construction; development, interpretation, and 
uses of tests of general and special abilities, and the techniques of handling 
test data. Four periods a week. Six credits. Miss Klinesmith. 

Psychology 411-412. Experimental Psychology. A course in which group 
and individual investigations are conducted. The student will be introduced 
to laboratory techniques, methods, and results. Four periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Fee, $2.00 each semester. (Offered in alternate years. 
Offered first semester as Psychology 401, three semester hours credit in 1953- 
54.) Dr. Erdelyi. 

Psychology 421. Contemporary Viewpoints in Psychology. A comparative 
survey of different points of view represented in the writings of present 
day psychologists. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. E. K. Dodd. 

Psychology 422. Psychological Problems. The content will vary according 
to the interests of the group. Each student will be responsible for some 
research or library investigation. Three periods a week for second semester. 
Three credits. Dr. E. K. Dodd. 

Psychology 431. Practicum in Testing. Students are given experience in the 
use of the Terman-Merrill, Wechsler, and similiar tests. Three periods a 
week for first semester. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. Miss Klinesmith. 

Psychology 432. Clinical Procedures with Children. This course will offer 
practical work in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of the difficulties of 
children. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 
Miss Klinesmith. 

RUSSIAN 

Professor Brenner 

Russian 171-172. Beginning Russian. For students who enter college with 
fewer than two units in Russian. The basic vocabulary and fundamental 
grammatical structure of the language; practice in conversation and reading 
of easy Russian texts. Five periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 

Russian 173-174. Intermediate Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 171-172 or 
two units of high school Russian. Thorough review of grammar; reading of 
selected texts from modern prose writers; conversation on topics of current 
interest. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 

Russian 271-272. Introduction to Russian Literature. Prerequisite: Russian 
173-174. Readings from novelists and dramatists of the nineteenth century- 
Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, and Tolstoy; life and culture of the times. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 

Russian 371-372. Recent Russian Literature. Prerequisite: Russian 173-174. 
Readings from Chekhov, Gorky and others; the country and people as pic- 
tured in Russian literature. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Brenner. 



138 Mary Washington College 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Allen, Darter 

Associate Professor Graves 

Assistant Professor Clyde Carter 

Students who choose a major program in sociology must take 
thirty-six credits in sociology and related subjects. Twenty-four 
of these credits are to be taken in sociology, and must include 
Sociology 201-202. The twelve remaining credits are to be elected 
in the related fields of government, history, economics, psycholo- 
gy, philosophy, and geography, with the approval of the Depart- 
ment of Sociology. 

Sociology 201. Principles of Sociology. A study of the basic characteristics 
of group life; development of society and culture; interaction between per- 
sons and groups. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Allen. Dr. Darter, Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 202. Social Problems. Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Social change; 
social and personal disorganization; mobility; delinquency; crime; industrial 
and other group conflicts. Three periods a week for the second semester. 
Three credits. Mr. Allen, Dr. Darter, Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 301. Introduction to Anthropology. A brief survey of prehistory; 
origin of languages, races, art, religion, and political, economic and other 
institutions. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 302. Culture and Personality. Effect of culture upon the individ- 
ual and of socially sanctioned goals and values upon personal attitudes and 
behavior. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 331. The Family. A social, psychological and cultural study of 
marriage and family relations. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 332. Social Welfare Work. A study of the problems, methods, and 
practices in the field of social welfare. Three periods a week for the second 
semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 335. Marriage and the Family. Three periods a week for the 
first semester. Three credits. Miss Beeler. (Enrollment limited to juniors 
and seniors.) 

Sociology 341. Rural Sociology. Rural social structure and institutions, 
rural backgrounds of American culture; historical and contemporary rural- 
urban migration. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 342. Urban Sociology. Origin, character and significance of urban 
communities. Common problems of city life; ecological factors in the growth 
of cities and their influence upon personality. Three periods a week for the 
second semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 351. Sociology of Leadership. An analysis of leadership types, 
patterns, and the leadership process; societal, cultural, social-interactional 
and personality factors underlying leadership. Three periods a week for 
the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 



Spanish 139 

Sociology 352. Juvenile Delinquency. A sociological analysis of the nature, 
extent, causes and treatment of delinquency. Three periods a week for the 
second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 
1953-54.) Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 401. Sociology of the Child. The emergence of personality with 
the child's socially defined roles in primary groups; social formation of 
attitudes. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Dr. 
Graves. 

Sociology 402. Child Welfare. Government and private agencies promoting 
family welfare; child health, play, education; delinquency and treatment. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Dr. Graves. 

Sociology 411. Population Problems. Historical and contemporary popula- 
tion trends; major population problems and efforts to cope with them. Three 
periods a week for the first semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered 
in 1953-54.) Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 412. Criminology. Delinquency and crime; nature and extent; 
causal theories; present tendencies and programs of treatment. Three periods 
a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 421. Race Relations. Racial groups in America; race-conscious- 
ness; marginal persons and groups; inter-racial tensions, conflicts, accommo- 
dations and cooperation. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 422. Sociology of Religion. A study of social factors in the origin, 
development, and function of religious institutions, with emphasis upon 
the basic principles in the Judeo-Christian Tradition. Three periods a week 
for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not 
offered in 1953-54.) Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 491. History of Social Theory. A study of theories and methods 
of sociology; characteristics of significant systems; controversial issues and 
trends. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 492. Methods of Social Research. Methods of investigating 
selected problems of current importance with emphasis upon individual 
work. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. 
Carter. 

SPANISH 

Professors Cabrera, Stansbury 

Associate Professor Mcintosh* 

Assistant Professors Stephenson, Jones, Greene 

Instructors Brignull, Herman 

Students who choose a major program in Spanish must take 
thirty-six credits in Spanish and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1. Twenty-four credits in Spanish, of which at least eighteen 
must be chosen from courses numbered 200 or higher. Spanish 
221-222 is required. 

*On leave of absence, first semester, 1952-53. 



140 Mary Washington College 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 

History 341-342, Latin American History 6 credits 

Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign 

language 1 2 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credist 

A course in the 300 or the 400 group from another 

foreign language - 6 credits 

Language 381-382, Origin and Development 

of Language 6 credits 

Unless exempted by the head of the department, each Spanish 
major should live in Spanish House during at least one year of 
her college course. 

Spanish 121-122. Beginning Spanish. For students who enter college with 
fewer than two units in high school Spanish. Five periods a week. Six credits. 
Staff. 

Spanish 123-124. Intermediate Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-122 or 
two or three units of high school Spanish. Conversation and composition: 
review of grammatical principles. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. 
Cabrera, Dr. Mcintosh, Dr. Greene, Miss Brignull, Miss Herman. 

Spanish 221-222. Literature of Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 123-124 or four 
units of high school Spanish. A survey of the great periods in Spanish litera- 
ture with readings from representative works in the drama, novel, and poetry. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Cabrera. 

Spanish 321-322. Survey of Spanish-American Literature. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 221-222. Three periods a week. Six credits. Dr. Cabrera, Dr. Stephen- 
son, Miss Herman. 

Spanish 323-324. Lyric Poetry. Prerequisite: Spanish 221-222 or permission 
of the instructor. The lyric in Spain and Spanish America from the reign 
of Juan II to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in 
alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Stephenson. 

Spanish 325-326. The Novel in Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 221-222. A study 
of the novel from its origin to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Stephenson. 

Spanish 421-422. Modern Writers of Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 321-322. 
A thorough study of the cultural activity and civilization of modern Spain 
with special emphasis on the literary output of the outstanding novelists, 
dramatics, essayists, and poets. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered 
in alternate years. Offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Greene. 

Spanish 425-426. The Golden Age. Prerequisite: A Spanish course from the 
300 group. Representative plays of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; 
prose of the period with emphasis on the Don Quijote. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1953-54.) Dr. Mcintosh. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



June 1952 



Bachelor of Arts 



Adams, Charlotte Wales 

Adams, Emily Clisby— 

Amis, Jean Elizabeth 

Amory, Gwendolyn - — 

Andresos, Chrysanthe 

Arrington, Carolyn.- 

Attianese, Marie Carroll 

Barton, Elizabeth Anne 

Beck, Anne Ernestine- ~ 

Beck, Elfreda Louise 

Belew, Betty Wood 

Bell, Roselyn Mac 

Bidgood, Josephine Langhorne.. 
Birmingham, Catherine Anne— 

Bobbin, Jacqueline Marie 

Bold, Frances Ann 

Braithwaite, Betty Jo 

Branner, Suzanne Weitzel 

Bruce, Mary Eleanor - „.. 

Burgess, Bobbie Carson — — 

Burklin, Alethea Wallace 

Burton, Peggy Gray 

B usemann , Eva.- 



Caffey, Anne Brittain 

Campbell, Adelaide McBride.. 

Carpenter, Beverley Anne 

Carter, Frances Jacquelin 

Casey, Frances Evans 

Ceglis, Anne Lee...- 

Chase, Anne Gay 

Clary, Ann Roane.. 

Crews, Jean Marie 

Crim, Ella Virginia 

Croswell, June B — 

Curtain, Judith Ann- 

Dabney, Florence Miller 

Dance, Janye Allen „. 

Davis, Edith Cushing. 

Davis, Jacquelin 

Davis, Suzanne Manning 

DeMott, Evelyn Parrish 

Dickson, Eleanor Enders 

Donald, Virginia - 

Duke, Eleanor Carrington. 



Norfolk, Va. 

..„ - S ta u n ton , Va. 

„ Norfolk, Va. 

Hampton, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Grundy, Va. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Pineville, Ky. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Glenhead, N. Y. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

.Upper Montclair, N. J. 

— Falls Church, Va. 

Cross Junction, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

O pp , Al a . 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

Arlington, Va. 

Hampton, Va. 

Round Hill, Va. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

- Stafford, Va. 

Chancellor, Va. 

Crozet , Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

-.-.Washington, D. C. 

Culpeper, Va. 

- -. Norfolk, Va. 

..North Little Rock, Ark. 
Adams, Mass. 



Richmond, Va. 

Halifax, Va. 

Lexington, Va. 

Concord, Va. 

-Saint Louis, Mo. 

,„ Roanoke, Va. 

.Bogota, N. J. 



..Tryon, N. C. 
.....Norfolk, Va. 



Earnshaw, Katherine Love.. 

Edmonds, Mary Mapp — 

Epes, Jacquelin Segar_ „... 



..Brandywine, Md. 

Painter, Va. 

Blackstone, Va. 



142 



Mary Washington College 



Evans, Mildred Louise «, 

Ewell, Jessie Jerdone 

Finney, Mary Lou 

Foley, Mildred Geraldine. 

Foster, Mary Elaine.- -, 

Fowler, Barbara Anne 

Friedman, Selma R 



Baltimore, Md. 

...-Charlottesville, Va. 

Parksley, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Front Royal, Va. 

Ringgold, Va. 

-Newport News, Va. 



Gaines, Ann North 

Gardner, Betty Joan ~ 

Garrett, Gay Brooke 

Genovese, Sarina Anne 

Gibson, Marjorie Suzanne- 



Warrenton, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Deltaville, Va. 

.Falls Church, Va. 
Mahwah, N. J. 



Green, Margaret McArthur — -...Montgomery, Ala. 

Hagberg, Lilla Ann.. 



.- -. —.Worcester, Mass. 

Ham, Elizabeth Ann - - „ Crewe, Va. 

Hart, Anne de Beelen „ Washington, D. C. 

Heilmann, Janet Caroline - „ „ Chevy Chase, Md. 

Henley, Betty June...- Washington, D. C. 

Henley, Norma Audrey „ - Richmond, Va. 

Holzshu, Betty Clarke - Baltimore, Md. 

Horan, Nancy Dorothy „ South Dartmouth, Mass. 

Hors tman , Dolores Janice „ Wes tfield , N . J. 

H ulme, Nora Lea - „ „ _ Arlington , Va. 

Huston, Sarah Jane.— - - —.Dayton, Ohio 

H u tcheson, Susan Daniel — „ Ashland, Va. 



Jefferson, Betty Jean Fredericksburg, Va. 

Jennings, Margaret Carroll „ - Fredericksburg, Va. 

Jones, Catherine Ann „ Birmingham, Ala. 

Jones, Mary Ann - Norfolk, Va. 

Jones, Mildred Louise - - Roanoke, Va. 

Jones, Susan Burgess - —West Chester, Pa. 



Katchen, Joanne Rothschild... 

Kimble, Barbara Ann— 

King, Carol Ellen.. 



Kolarik, Mildred Frances.. 
Kucher, June Anne- 



Lambright, Carolina Gale... 
Lamprinakos, Tina James.—. 

Landes, Mary Margaret 

Latham, Mary Elizabeth 

Leftwich, Margaret Elaine.. 

Line, Patricia Elizabeth— 

Litton, Betty Gene.— 

Long, Joyce Adelle 



McGinnes, Gertrude Stedman— 

McKnight, Nita Elizabeth 

McLeod, Nancy Wyatt 

Macheras, Helen P 

Manwaring, Emily Cole 

Maynard, Dorothy Gaines— 

Menikoff, Meryle„ „ 

Meyer, Marjorie Joan 



.Highland Park, N. J. 

Alexandria, Va. 

—.Baltimore, Md. 

Abingdon, Md. 

Hillsdale, N. J. 



Alexandria, Va. 

Asheville, N. C. 

Hinsdale, 111. 

Bowie, Texas 

.Pulaski, Va. 



Asbury Park, N. J. 
—.Round Hill, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 

...Washington, D. C. 
-Birmingham, Ala. 
„ Norfolk, Va. 



Lexington, Va. 

Niantic, Conn. 

. Richmond, Va. 

.New York, N. Y. 
—Baldwin, N. Y. 



Degrees Conferred 



143 



Miller, Barbara Jane - — Catonsville, Md. 

Miller, Nancy Bailey.™. Harrisonburg, Va. 



Morgan, Rita Wanda.. 

Morris, Marilyn Marie 

Moss, Mabel Patricia 

Moss, Mary Edwina 

Motley, Nancy Stump „, 

Mount, Eleanor Agnew.. 



.Andersonvillc, Va. 

^..Arlington, Va. 

..-Newport News, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Moxley, Nancy Theresa - Elk Creek, Va. 

Murden, Dorothy Lynelle- ~ - — Roanoke, Va. 



Nader, Elaine Frances 

Norris, Betsy Anne 

Norwood, Ruth Hart 



Methuen, Mass. 

Winterport, Maine 

.„ Bethesda, Md. 



O'Dette, Ann Hinda 

Oliver, Carol Elizabeth.. 

Olson, Kathryn Margaret — 

Orem, Kathryn Marilyn 

♦Orkney, Virginia Elizabeth.. 

Orwiler, Ann „ 

Overbey, Betty Anne 

Oviedo, Dolores Carmen.™ 



.Plainfield, N. J. 
....Richmond, Va. 

Flint, Mich. 

Norfolk, Va. 



-.Laurel, Miss. 

Nelsonville, Ohio 

Richmond, Va. 

- New York, N. Y. 



Parker, Nancy Marie. — 



Parsons, Alice Madge.. 

Pershing, Marjorie Dean 

Peterson, Elizabeth Brame.™ 

Proffitt, Mildred Evangeline Columbia, Va. 



, Whaleyville, Va. 

...Chevy Chase, Md. 
.Fredericksburg, Va. 
....Lawrenceville, Va. 



Randall, James M 

Rawlis, Margaret Eugenia.. 

Resch, John Edward 

Ribble, Mary Davidson...- 

Riddle, Jo Sidney.. 



Rivenburgh, Ruth Vedder.. 

Roberts, Priscilla Jane 

Roeder, Evelyn Irma - 



..Fredericksburg, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

.Ashland, Ky. 



, Silver Spring, Md. 

..West Hartford, Conn. 
— Roanoke, Va. 



Sachs, Leah Belle 

Sakakini, Ajia Louise 

Sattelmaier, Freya. 



- — -...Lexington, Va. 

„.„ Norfolk, Va. 

Stevensville, Md. 

Saunders, Fred Wesley, Jr - Fredericksburg, Va. 

Scholl, Althea Mae - Canton, N. C. 



Schroeder, Helen Bagley 

Self, Jane Marie- „ 

Shackleford, Indie Ephinia.. 

Sherman, Margaret Card 

Showker, Khalida B 

Sindlinger, Claire Kendrick. 

Smith, Avee Anne 

Smith, Cornelia Gaston 

Starkey, Julia Margaret.™ 

Staylor, Barbara Ann... 



Manassas, Va. 

-...Chatham, Va. 

Cheriton, Va. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Holmdel, N. J. 

- Grundy, Va. 

East Alton, 111. 

.- Blackstone, Va. 



Ch ucka tuck , Va. 

Steele, Doris Virginia - „ Wash ington , D. C. 

Stevens, Elizabeth Corinne Center Cross, Va. 

Straughan, Nancy Carolyn..™ Fredericksburg, Va. 



144 



Mary Washington College 



Taggart, Wilma Eileen. 

Taylor, Mary Ann 

Taylor, Ruth Ann., 



Therrel, Martha Jeanne.. 
Thierbach, June.. 



Richmond, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

.Parksley, Va. 



Tignor, Jessica Elizabeth 

Tremain, Mary Fraser 

Tucker, Barbara Joyce 

Underwood, Ruth O'Mae 

Upshur, Jewel Whitaker „... 

Van Eppes, Shirley Ann 

Vogelback, Judith Field 

Wagner, Felde Lee 

Wagner, Nancy Jane. 

Wallace, Mary Elizabeth 

Wallace, Virginia Gardner 

Walton, Susan Ann 

Ward, Mary Alice — 

Weatherford, Elizabeth Pollard 
Webb, Nannette Ruckman.. 
Webb, Phyllis Joan. 



Atlanta, Ga. 

.New Rochelle, N. Y. 
.....Callao, Va. 



.Mexico City, Mex. 
Arlington, Va. 



...Lynchburg, Va. 
Eastville, Va. 



Troy, N. Y. 

-Fredericksburg, Va. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Altoona, Pa. 

Arlington, Va. 

Bedford, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 

. Vernon Hill, Va. 

Fort Defiance, Va. 

Bassett, Va. 



Weledniger, June Andrea 

Wells Vivian Katherine 

Whitcomb, Melita Ethel 

White, Barbara May.. 



.New York, N. Y. 
.Richmond, Va. 



Wilkerson, June Estellc 

Wilkinson, Charlotte Marie.. 
Willard, Bettie Faison 



Hillsboro, N. H. 

.New Milford, Conn. 

Back Bay, Va. 

„ Chilhowie, Va. 



Williams, Nancy Rutherford. 

Williams, Ruth Ethelyn _ 

Wilson, Phoebe Anna 

Winsbro, Anna Gibson 

Wolfe, Jean Wray — 

Woodford, Betty Jo 

Zink, Mary Carruth 



Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Graniteville, R. I. 

Strasburg, Va. 

.Luray, Va. 



West Point, Va. 

Huddleston, Va. 

Sioux City, la. 



Bachelor of Science 



Abendschein, Patricia Ann.. 
Adams, Jane Marie 



Bowen, Jimmie Rae 

Bowman, Bessie Barbara.. 
Bowman, Shirley Jean„.. 
Britten, Joan Margaret.. 



Coates, Rebecca Catherine- 
Cooper, Nancy Carroll 



Economy, Athena George 



..Arlington, Va. 
.....Grafton, Vt- 



Alexandria, Va. 

„ Timberville, Va. 

Baltimore, Md. 

.Middletown, Conn. 

.._ Etlan, Va. 

Baltimore, Md. 



-Roanoke, Va. 



Fawthrop, Bernice Irene 



^Drakes Branch, Va. 



Degrees Conferred 145 

Gass, Nancy Ann - — Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Gibson, Corleta Mary.„ _ ~ — Mahwah, N. J. 

Harding, Mary Ann — - — ~- Ellerson, Va. 

Jones, Jean Ramsey - - ~ Amherst, Va. 

Longo, Lilly Jeannette...-. Richmond, Va. 

McClenny, Martha Ann — - Franklin, Va. 

Montgomery, Betsy MacRae- ~ Fine Creek Mills, Va. 

Nails, Elizabeth Alice .- Alexandria, Va. 

Ruhroth, Gisela Elizabeth -. - New Bedford, Mass. 

Wilson, Lloyd Wilbur „ -. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Wong, Mary Lee -.Washington, D. C. 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

Brahs, Rita Marie ~ - — —Hawthorne, N. J. 

Davis, Dorothy Allene — Waynesboro, Va. 

Davis, Marian Lou — Colonial Beach, Va. 

Gessford, Marilynne..- - Washington, D. C. 

Palladino, Lucille Ann „ Horseheads, N. Y. 

Sims, Mary Claire.- - — _ - — Millburn, N. J. 

Smith, Elizabeth Bennington Comers Rock, Va. 

Bachelor of Science in Health, Physical Education, 
and Recreation 

Buckwalter, Diana Gay „ „ Norfolk, Va. 

Farmer, Phyllis Mae -.„ - „„. Richmond, Va. 

Heatwole, Maryanne „. Weyers Cave, Va. 

King, Shirley Jean „ Portsmouth, Va. 

Martin, Betsy Lane „ „ „ Danville, Va. 

Moodispaw , Jean Es telle - .- Arlington, Va. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



Session of 1952-53 



Aaron, Sue 

Abbot, Jane Oliver „ 

Abbot, Lucy Lewis ~ 

Abbott, Janet 

Achenbach, Mary Eleanor 

Adams, Joan Harrison 

Adams, Nancy Lee 

Adams, Shirley Anne „ 

Adams, Suzanne „ 

Adamson, Evelyn Jacquelin 

Ahern, Jean Frances 

Akers, Margaret Ellen ~ 

Aldridge, Agnes Juanita 

Alexander, Agnes Patton 

Allen, Lynn Marie .. 

Allison, Jo Ann 



Almond, Beverly Ann — 

Alston, Mildred Jo 

Amiss, Ruth Ann 

Amos, Nell Kirtley 



Anderson, Anne Frances 

Anderson, Betty Ruth .. 

Anderson, Dixie Lee 

Anderson, Jean Anne — 

Anderson, Margaret Patricia 

Anderson, Myra Burr 

Anderson, Nancy Grove 

Anderson, Patsy Ruth 

Andrews, Janet Heath 

Andrews, Mary Ann 

Andrews, Nancy Mae 



Highland Park, 111. 

.... Lynchburg, Va. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Rye, N. Y. 

McLean, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Blairs, Va. 

Dry Fork, Pa. 

Blacksburg, Va. 

,. Charlestown, N. H. 

.... Roanoke, Va. 

.. Virginia Beach, Va. 

Fairfield, Va. 

River Forest, 111. 

Warren ton, Va. 

Locust Grove, Va. 

— „. Fairfax, Va. 

Luray, Va. 

Tampa, Fla. 



Andrews, Rosalie Elizabeth 

Angus, Wendy Norman ..-. 

Apostolou, Effie Nicholas 

Apostolou, Nancy Niki 

Archer, Lynne McKinley 

Arlook, Joyce Helene ._ _ 

Armistead, Ellena Marie 

Armistead, Joanne Westwood .... 

Armstrong, Jean Merritt ~„ 

Arnold, Elizabeth Juliette 

Arrington, Doris Dina _... 

Arrington, Virginia Lee 

Arritt, Nolan P „ 



Charlottesville, Va. 

....... Man, W. Va. 

Union, Ky. 

Delta, Pa. 

.... Sugar Grove, Va. 

Miami, Fla. 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

.~ Portsmouth, Va. 

Pax ton, 111. 

Blacksburg, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

„. Manhasset, N. Y. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Passaic, N. J. 

Hudgins, Va. 

Nathalie, Va. 

Tappan, N. Y. 

Thomaston, Ga. 

... Glade Spring, Va. 
— Alexandria, Va. 

Vienna, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Exmore, Va. 

Exmore, Va. 



Ashbury, Ann Rixey , - — 

Ashby, Lou Ann — 

Ash by, Marlene Joyce - - — 

Ashley, Patricia Ann Montfomery, W. Va. 

Atkinson, Carolyn Allene - Norfolk, Va. 

Atkinson, Margaret Dunlap Norfolk, Va. 

Ault, Carol Gwin ~.~ „ .. „ Charlottesville, Va. 

Avery, Lydia Coonley _ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Ayers, Susan Oakley Ashland, Va. 



Register of Students 



147 



Babb, Barbara Ann 

Bagby, Pauline Aiken 

Bailes, Martha Virginia .... 
Bainbridge, Sheila Patricia 
Baker, Lynn 



_ Richmond, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Strasburg, Va. 

Wallingford, Vt. 



.. — Staten Island, N. Y. 

„ Norfolk, Va. 

A tl ee, Va. 

„ ™. Falls Church, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

„ Danville, Va. 

„ „ Vero Beach, Fla. 

Wa tertown , Conn. 

„ - Richmond, Va. 

Evans ton, 111. 

„ „ New York, N. Y. 

.„ Claremont, N. H. 

Winchester, Va. 

Bartenstein, Mildred Nannell „ Warrenton, Va. 

Bartz, Betty Ann „ Great Neck, N. Y. 

Bass, Martha Consuelo Munden, Va. 

Bauman, Marilyn Phyllis Westwood, N. J. 

Baylor, Elizabeth Joy „ „ ._„ Churchville, Va. 

Bear, Elizabeth Randolph Alexandria, Va. 

Beasley, Ethel L — „ „ Arlington, Va. 



Baker, Madge Drummond 

Baldwin, Mary Anne 

Ball, William _..„ „ 

Ballard, Lavinia Roberta 

Barker, Frances Mona 

Barker, Sharron Gail 

Barlow, Sylvia Ann 

Barnes, Carolyn Jane 

Barnes, Jeanette Lucy 

Baron, Joan 

Barrett, Beverly Ann 

Barry, Jane Ijams .... 



Beck, Glennette _.. 
Becraft, Mrs. Sabina Lewis 

Bedall, Grayce Boyette 

Beddall, Ann Elizabeth „. 

Bedell, Suzanne Ruth 

Begel, Judith Ann 

Bell, Garnette Louise ..- 

Bennett, Constance Mae 

Bennett, Jean Audrey — 

Bennett, Joan 



_ Chancellor, Va. 

Chancellor, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

„.. Richmond, Va. 

Westfield, N. J. 

,._ Wyomissing, Penn. 

Newport, R. I. 

— Washington, D. C. 

Danville, Va. 

Sharon, Penn. 



Bentley, Beverly Ann 

Benz, Charlotte Gray 

Berdon, Alberta Charlotte 

Bergenty, Martha Mae 

Berger, Nancy Gayle 

Berkeley, Anne Marie 

Berkman, Bernice 

Berry, Anne Lee 

Bestwick, Vera Louise 

Beswick, Claudia Anne 

Bethea, Nellie Lent „. 

Bickers, Suzanne Page 

Bid well, Carolyn Suzanne 

Biggers, Elizabeth Mason .. 
Billings, Katharine Louise . 
Billingsley, Elizabeth Carol 

Binford, Thelma B .._. 

Bing, Mary Ann _ „. 

Bird, Mary Kate 

Bishop, Jeanetta Ann 

Bitter, Joan Catherine 

Black, Jane LaTrobe 

Black, Janet Elaine.. 



Blackwell, Elizabeth Goldwyn 



Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Natchez, Miss. 

Canaah, Conn. 

„. So. Hadley Falls, Mass. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Sands ton, Va. 

Cumberland, Va. 

Newark, Dela. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Stanardsville, Va. 

„ Richmond, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

_ North Clarendon, Vt. 

- „ West Point, N. Y. 

Arlington, Va. 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

— Strasburg, Va. 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

_~ Eggertsville, N. Y. 

Elkton, Va. 

Washington, D. C. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



148 



Mary Washington College 



Blank, Lee Joyce 

Blankenship, Virginia Lee 

Blankingship, Antoinette Heath 

Block, Phyllis Eve 

Blue, Cynthia Faye _... _ 

Bock, Elizabeth Lucinda 

Bomar, Mary Rowland _ 

Boone, Katherine Louise 

Booth, Dorothy Barton 

Borke, Suzanne Mary „.. „ 

Bosworth, Barbara Ann 

Bourne, Norma Sylvia _ 

Bowbeer, Donna Grace _ 

Bowers, W. E. 

Bowles, Sara Elizabeth 

Boyer, Patsy Louise 

Bradburn, Margaret Mae „ 

Bradbury, Elizabeth Anne 

Bradfield, Lucie Jane .„ 

Bradley, Patricia Ruth 

Bradshaw, Beverly Joan 

Brady, Valerie Jeanne 



— Baltimore, Md. 

— Richmond, Va. 
_ Habana, Cuba 

— Baltimore, Md. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Fayetteville, W. Va. 

Washington, D. C. 
. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Columbus, Ga. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

~. Florence, Mass. 

— Arlington, Va. 

.... Dahlgren, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 



Bramble, Elizabeth Sutton 

Bristol, Nancy Emily 

Britt, Dorothy Hunter 

Brittle, Frances Earle 



New Cumberland, Penn. 

Washington, D. C. 

- Fredericksburg, Va. 

Leesburg, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Burgess, Va. 

— Bryn Mawr, Penn. 

Richmond, Va. 

Brookfield, Conn. 

Zyni, Va. 



, Chase City, Va. 



Broas, Pauline Georgianna _ ~ _.. Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Brody, Helene Lois Haverhill, Mass. 

Brooks, Elliott England, Jr „ .. „ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Brooks, Marjorie Viola _ Alexandria, Va. 



Brooks, Virginia Gouldin 

Broome, Imre Jo 

Brown, Barbara Ann ~ 

Brown, Betsy Alice 

Brown, Carol Stone 

Brown, Carolyn Wyatt 

Brown, D. R., Jr 

Brown, Ellen Marie 

Brown, James Dall, Jr 

Brown, Millicent Judith 

Brown, Patricia Warwick 

Browning, Margaret Ann . — 

Browning, Rhoda Evon 

Broyles, Nancy Carolyn 



Fredericksburg, Va. 

Danville, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Melbourne, Fla. 

Arlington, Va. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

_ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Machodoc, Va. 

Carteret, N. J. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Ashland, Ky. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Richmond, Va. 

Luray, Va. 

Annapolis, Md. 



Brumback, Norma Jean - .. _ 

Buchanan, Mary Gale .. 

Buening, Patricia M „ Louisville, Ky. 

Buhler, Nancy Ann ._ _ - - Falls Church, Va. 

Bulley, Doreen Joan „ .. - Fredericksburg, Va. 

Buran, Nancy Lucile - - Asheville, N. C. 

Burchell, Bernard Theodore Dahlgren, Va. 

Bures, Celia Anne - Charlottesville, Va. 

Burgdorff, Carolyn Marjorie .. Ocala, Fla. 

Burke, Barbara Lee - „ West Hartford, Conn. 

Burks, Marian Leonie ~ Glasgow, Va. 

Burks, Rheta Nelson „ Glasgow, Va. 

Burnette, Loretta Jean .„ „ „.„ Gladys, Va. 

Burrus, Marjorie Slaughter „ - Orange, Va. 



Register of Students 149 

Burton, Aldeen - - Buffalo, N. Y. 

Busemann, Ute Cornelia Hampton, Va. 

Butler, Dora Alice - Wake, Va. 

Butler, Shirley Widener ~ Blacksburg, Va. 

Butzner, Viola P „ ~ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Byrd, Jean Page ~ Exraore, Va. 

Cabell, Laura Wilson — Needham, Mass. 

Caird, Diana Jackson - ~ Troy, N. Y. 

Callahan, Betsy Jean Baskerville, Va. 

Callis, Shirley Ann - — Grimstead, Va. 

Calloway, Celia Ann....„ ...Ft. Clayton, C. Z. 

Calloway, Nancy Randolph- _.. —Ft. Clayton, C. Z. 

Camp, Margaret Washington, D. C. 

Campbell, Cecelia Ann Washington, D. C. 

Campbell, Janet Crawford Towson, Md. 

Campbell, Virginia Gail ~ Belleville, N. J. 

Cannaday, Maxine „ Martinsville, Va. 

Cannon, Everett Kirk — Arlington, Va. 

Canter, Susan Mary Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Cantierd, Lucy Florence ! Lynchburg, Va. 

Canu, J. F _ Dahlgren, Va. 

Capps, Anne Virginia „ Norfolk, Va. 

Carlin, Emilie Ann Paterson, N. J. 

Carmichael, Beverly Ann Perrysburg, Ohio 

Carr, Julia Burroughs „ Brandywine, Md. 

Carroll, Anita Jeanette Annandale, Va. 

Carroll, Barbara Ann Annandale, Va. 

Carruthers, Joan Diane Greenwich, N. Y 

Carter, Betsy Emma Jean Oneonta, Ala. 

Carter Carol West Hartford, Conn. 

Carter, Lola Jane „ — Oneonta, Ala. 

Caruso, Joan Barbara _ Arlington, Va. 

Carver, Beatrice Ann Fredericksburg, Va. 

Cash, Barbara Jean Glasgow, Va. 

Castro, Ester Montevideo, Uruguay 

Catlett, Jo Anne Gladstone, Va. 

Catlett, Willie Christine Scottsville, Va. 

Caverlee, Barbara June Fredericksburg, Va. 

Cecil, Sara Monroe „ — Roanoke, Va. 

Cella, Eileen Marie „ _ Trenton, N. J. 

Chaffee, Mary Osborne ~ Arlington, Va. 

Chandler, Betty Ann „. Norfolk, Va. 

Chaplin, Mary Shirley „ Falmouth, Va. 

Chapman, Peggy Louise - Parr, S. C. 

Chapman, Peggy Joyce, Mrs „ ....Tails Church, Va. 

Childress, Carolyn Elizabeth Dyersburg, Tenn. 

Chilton, Ann _ Lansdowne, Penn. 

Chilton, Jane Braxton _ White Stone, Va. 

Chilton, Mary Hill ...„ „ Remington, Va. 

Chinn, Janet Noonan Fredericksburg, Va. 

Chittenden, Mary Ann Sanford, Fla. 

Christian, June Vooght Richmond, Va. 

Christian, Margaret Turner „ Williamsburg, Va. 

Christian, Mr. Murial Earline Fredericksburg, Va. 

Christopher, Bettie Corbin „ Remo, Va. 

Christopher, Diane Neda Falls Church, Va. 

Churchell, Mary Dingerfield Dahlgren, Va. 



150 



Mary Washington College 



Clark, Barbara Ann .. 

Clark, Betty Ann 

Clark, Patricia Arline 

Clarke, Eleanor Florence 

Clarke, Mary Joretta 

Clemans, Janet Louise 

Clements, Jacquelyn Josephine 

Clements, Janet Swan ... „ 

Clements, Martha Eleanor 

Coates, Lucy Huger 

Cobb, Antha Jean 

Cockey, Elizabeth 

Cockrille, Lydia D. 

Coddington, Helen Elizabeth 

Cody, Jean Leiby .. — . 

Cohen, Hettie Roberta 

Cohen, Phyllis Ruth 

Coiner, Ann Elizabeth 

Coiner, Jane Elizabeth 

Coiner, Nancye Elizabeth ... 

Colbert, Mary Jacqueline 

Cole, Carol June 

Coleman, Emma Jane 

Coleman, Mary Nelson ....... 

Coleman, Patricia Louise 
Coles, Margaret Bancroft 
Collier, Mary Katherine 
Collins, Ann Cuthbert — 

Collins, Ann Elizabeth 

Collins, Joan Marie 

Combs, Martha Allen 

Cook, Mary Elizabeth 



Cooksey, Ethel Randolph ..... 

Cooley, Anita Louise — . 

Cooper, Carol Lee «. 

Cooper, Jo Barbara - — 

Copeman, Coralee Anne — 

Copen, Barbara Lorraine 

Copper, Jean Ann ... 

Corbett, Nancy Claire 

Corleto, Francis Marie 

Corner, Charlotte 

Cornoni, Joan Claire ~ 

Corpuel, Marilyn Enid . 

Corum, Mildred Lucille 

Cosby, Harriette Ann ... . 

Couk, Dorothy Gail 

Coustau, Jeanne, Mrs — — 

Covington, Patricia Ives — 

Cox, Betty Joan 

Cox, Gary Lee . 

Coyle, Joanne Elizabeth - 

Crabtree, June Marie — 

Craddock, Marcia Davis 

Cranford, Betty Louise 

Crawford, Natalie Preston 

Creech, Jane Calhoun 

Crigler, Constance Ann 



Norfolk, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Hall wood, Va. 

.. Stanleytown, Va. 

.. Richmond, Va. 

... Lynchburg, Va. 

. Towson, Md. 

Clarksville, Va. 

... Lexington, Va. 

Franklin, Va. 

Sparks, Md. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 

Rye, N. Y. 

Laurelton, N. Y. 

Pikesville, Md. 

Kenbridge, Va. 

Waynesboro, Va. 

Waynesboro, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Bedford, Va. 

Charles Town, W. Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Moorestown, N. J. 

. . Arlington, Va. 

....... Washington, D. C. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Scottsville, Va. 

.... Raleigh, N. C. 

..... Yancey Mills, Va. 

Leesburg, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Chatham, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

„ Norfolk, Va. 

Dogue, Va. 

.... Waynesboro, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

— McLean, Va. 

— Winchester, Mass. 

Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Warfield, Va. 

Powhatan, Va. 

Jellico, Tenn. 



Marselle, France 

Arlington, Va. 

.. Beaufort, S. C. 

Annapolis, Md. 

— Cockeysville, Md. 
... Bowling Green, Va. 
Prospect Park, Penn. 

Falmouth, Va. 

Tazewell, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

..... Falls Church, Va. 



Register of Students 



151 



Crise, Adele Margaret 

Cromwell, Patricia Anne — 

Crossley, Paula Davis 

Cruise, Ilena Mae _ 



Cruise, Mary Alice 

Crump, Jacqueline Ann 
Culver, Ruth Anne — 



Cumming, Grace Hamilton , 

Curran, Janet Louise 

Curtis, Barbara Terry 

Curtis, Carolyn Jane 

Cutchin, Marian Osborn _.. 
Cutchins, Sandra Lee 



Miami, Fla. 

Warwick, Va. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Tazewell, Va. 

Tazewell, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

_ Newport News, Va. 

Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Orange, Va, 



Fredericksburg, Va. 
Suffolk, Va. 



Newport News, Va. 



D'Agata, Charles S. 

Dallas, Jane .. 

Dalton, Ruth Ann „ 

Daniels, Judith Howlett....... „ _ 

Daniels, Joan Allen 

D'Argenio, Anita Jeanette 

Davies, Elizabeth Louise 

Davies, Mary Pegram 

Davis, Betty Anne 

Davis, Carmelita Kathryn — 

Davis, Julia Lucy 

Davis, Kitty Rae _. 

Davis, Margaret Joan 

Davis, Mary Ann 

Davis, Mary Elizabeth 

Davis, Priscilla Anne — «. 

DeBarber, Madeliene Louise .... 

DeFontes, Francis James 

DeHaas , Gordon Tiffany 

Dektor, Norma H 

Dent, Barbara Lee 

Denis, Shelby Maude Plainfield, N. J. 

Dent, Lois Mildred ~. „™ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Dent, Patricia Ann „ Roanoke, Va. 

Denty, Ann Rawdon Arlington, Va. 

Dery, Rose-Marie ~ ~ _ Arlington, Va. 



Alexandria, Va. 

>.. Norfolk, Va. 

Pulaski, Va. 

Belleville, N. J. 

Lawrenceville, Va. 

. Washington, N. J. 

King George, Va. 

King George, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Greenville, Va. 

„ Machias, Maine 

Concord, Va. 

_ Katonah, N. Y. 

Vienna, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 

Beverly, Mass. 

Arlington, Va. 



-Washington, D. C. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Quantico, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 



DeWitt, Ann Truxal 

Diaz, Diana A 

Dick, Catherine Thornton 

Dickinson, Betsy Anne 

Diehl, Betty Butler 

Dilley, Julianne LaSalle 



Fredericksburg, Va. 

San-Juan, P. R. 

Morristown, Tenn. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 



„ Huntington, W. Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Dinsfriend, Harriet P Brookline, Mass. 

Director, Elaine .™ „ „ Washington, D. C. 

Dishman, James Dallas ._ Ninde, Va. 

Dixon, Eleanor Arlington, Va. 

Dodge, Mary Louella „ Arlington, Va. 

Dodrill, Ada Patricia _ _ ..„ Larchmont, N. Y. 

Dodson, Thomas Ivan „ „ _ Dahlgren, Va. 

Doggett, Bennie Sue Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Dollins, Ruth Eliza Yancey Mills, Va. 



Donahoe, Jean Elizabeth 
Donelan, Martha Anne ~.. 



Fredericksburg, Va. 
Columbia, S. C. 



Donoghue, Kathleen Anne „ .. „ Holyoke, Mass. 



!52 



Mary Washington College 



Dopier, Beverley 

Dorsey, Margaret Nelson _... 
Dorsey, Mary Ann Teresa 

Dove, Joan Paxton 

Drew, Mary Frances 

Drewrey, Eleanor Dickson 
Drogaris, Kay Nicholas — 
Drogaris, Toula Nicholas .. 

Dugger, Nancy Ruth .. 

Dunn, Gloria Marie 



Dunn, Jane Byrd .. 

Dunaway, Ann Lee ._ 

Durrette, Deldee June 

Durrette, Ellen Byrd „ 

Dutton, Carolyn Yvonne ... 
Duvall, Norma Ann 



~ Arlington, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

. — Blackstone, Va. 

Blackstone, Va. 

Denbigh, Va. 

... Mansfield, Mass. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Weems, Va. 

Luray, Va. 

Partlow, Va. 

— Newport, R. I. 
Arlington, Va. 



Eagle, Martha Anne 

Eanes, Barbara Anne 

Eanes, Patsy Ruth „. 

Eanes, Peggy Ann 

Earman, Elizabeth Catherine 

Easley, Ruth Sergeant 

East, Betty Wise „ 

Eaton, Pauline Merrill 

Eckles, Daphne Moore 

Edelson, Dawn Lila — — 

Ediss, Olive Winnie _« 



Edmondson, Helen Augusta .... 
Edwards, Irene „ „ 



Manassas, Va. 

„. Fredericksburg, Va. 
~~ Greensboro, N. C. 
... Greensboro, N. C. 

Harrisonburg, Va. 

..-Fredericksburg, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Hillsboro, N. H. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Hopewell, Va. 

Glade Spring, Va. 

Vienna, Va. 

.... New Orleans, La. 

Painter, Va. 

Marion, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 



Edwards , Lynn D unlop 

Elliott, Doris Wesley 

Ellis, Peggy Jo „ 

Emerson , Patricia Lee 

Engquist, Kathryn Amelia — Alexandria, Va. 

Esposito, Joan Ann Bayonne, N. J. 

Estes, Ruth Faye _ - Chase City, Va. 

Etchison, Mary Ann Engle „ „ Savannah, Ga. 

Etheridge, Sara Genevieve - Norfolk, Va. 

Eugley Betty Lou Norfolk, Va. 

Evans, Joyce Atlanta, Ga. 

Evans, Mary Anne — Hinsdale, 111. 



Fadeley, Ann Rice — Washington, D. C. 

Fair, Margaret Jane „ .. Syosset, N. Y. 



Farans, Diane Gail 

Fasick, Barbara Jean 

Faxon, Barbara Ester 

Feehery, Marian _. 

Feistman, Myron L 

Fekas, Mary Ellen .„. 

Ferrall, Joan Gardner 

Ferrell, Carroll Lee 

Ferrer, Margaret Josephine 

Fescier, Zeynep Hesna 

Fewell, Alice Patricia 

Fiala, Mary Louise Maury 

Figueroa, Lilliam Carmen 



Norwalk, Conn. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Quantico, Va. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

_.- Warwick, Va. 

..._ Annapolis, Md. 

> Richlands, Va. 

South Charleston, W. Va. 

New York, N. Y. 

Summerville, S. C. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Aguirre, Puerto Rico 



Register of Students 



53 



Filbin, R. F. 

Fink, Betty Lou » 

Fisher, Charlotte Evelyn 
Fisher, Mabel Virginia 
Fitchett, Mary Linda ~. 

Fix, Frances Anne 

Flaxington, Nan ~— .... 

Fletcher, Margaret Ann .. 
Fletcher, Mary Carolyn 
Fletcher, Rena Felicity — 

Flippo, Peggy Pratt 

Foley, Joan Dolores 



Dahlgren, Va. 

San Antonio, Texas 

Catonsville, Md. 

Quinton, Va. 

Capeville, Va. 

Lexington, Va. 

Warwick, Va. 



Foley, Michelle Anne 

Foley, Patricia Ann 

Fontaine, Frances Jeanette 
Ford, Louise B. 



Forsyth, Gwen Marilyn 
Fortier, Marie Annette 
Fortune, Anna M. 



Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Loch Raven, Md. 

... Fredericksburg, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Annapolis, Md. 

Danville, Va. 

_ Kernersville, N. C. 

Arlington, Va. 

Abington, Penn. 



Foster, Jean Francis 

Fowler, Emily Stuart — 

Fox, Betty England - 

Fox, Gayle Pamela 

Fox, Mary Ann 

Frame, Elizabeth Lyle 

Francis, Patricia Sue 

Franklin, Jenny-Lynn 

Frazier, Miriam Helene _.. 

Freeman, Roxanne 

French, Lena Sheetz 

French, Wilma Ann 

Frey, Jane Shirley 

Fridley, Mary Alyce 

Fried, June 

Friend, Emily Carolyn — 
Froelich, Barbara Ann ....... 



New Orleans, La. 

Quantico, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Doswell, Va. 

— Capron, Va. 

Camp Hill, Penn. 

Sutton, W. Va. 

... .._ Richwood, W. Va. 

Greenlee, Va. 

„ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Marion, Va. 

Latrobe, Penn. 

Woodstock, Va. 

— Arlington, Mass. 

Drexel Hill, Penn. 

Covington, Va. 

Flushing, N. Y. 

Roanoke, Va. 



»~ Torrington. Conn. 



Gabler, Maxine Clara 
Galloway, Janet Ann » 
Gait, Ann 



Galyen, Garnett William, 
Gape, Audrey Ann.. 



Garland, Barbara Ann .-.. 

Garland, Kathryn Jane 

Garland, Margaret Ann ... 

Garner, Joan Frances 

Garner, Mary Deans 

Garrett, Julianna Lawton 

Garrison, Ellison C 

Gary, Mary Jean 

Gates, Margaret 
Gay, Carol Jean 



Geier, Carrie Esther 

Geiger, Adrianne Hawk „.., 
Gerdetz, Dorothy Ludvina 
Gerken, Catherine Ann ..... 

Giannotti, Frances Ann 

Gibbens, Frances Bert 



Plainfield, N. J. 

Camp Lejeune, N. C. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Chancellor, Va. 

Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Radford, Va. 

Village, Va. 



— Richmond, Va. 

— Lewisetta, Va. 

Glasgow, Va. 

.Arlington, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 



West Palm Beach, Fla. 

McLean, Va. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Bluefield, W. Va. 

Herndon, Va. 



Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Arlington, Va. 



*54 



Mary Washington College 



Gibbs, Richard 

Gilbert, Martha 

Gilderdale, Cardelle 
Gill, Barbara 



Gillespie, Corrie Burnley 

Gillespie, Elizabeth Ambler 

Gillespie, Ruth Elizabeth 

Gilley, Sara Geraldine 

Gilliam, Christine 

Gilliam, Pauline 

Gladden, Virginia Lee .... 



Glantzburg, Anne Marye 

Glascock, Joyce Ann 

Glover, Lois Lilla 

Gluck, Pamela Nancy 

Goldenson, Dorothy Rose 

Goldenson, Frances Elizabeth 

Gooch, Margaret Louise 

Goode, Mary Williamson 

Gooding, Betty Ann 

Goodman, Lisa Saxon 

Gordon, Woodrow Wilson >_ 

Gorham, Mary Theresa 

Gorman, Anne Elizabeth _.... 

Gould, Cornelia Brownell — 

Gouldman, Mary Virginia ..... 

Grace, Faith Barbara _. 

Graff, Lois Man ton ... 

Graham, Carole Florence 

Graham, Julia Ann 

Graham, Mary Lewis 

Grant, Shirley Ann 

Graves, Ann Elizabeth 

Graves, Harriet Small — 

Gray, Elizabeth M — 

Gray, Sarah Baker — ~.. 

Greene, Jane Anne 



Haas, Catherine Lillian 

Hackney, Nancy Jane 

Hahn, D'Arcy Dianne ....... 

Haines, Ruth Ann „ .. 



Hairfield, Dorothy Faye 
Hairston, Sallie Staples .... 
Hale, Mary Saunders 



Quantico, Va. 

Dedham, Mass. 

Sharon, Conn. 

~ Alexandria, Va. 

Ashland, Va. 

Tazewell, Va. 

Monteray, Va. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Cape Charles, Va. 

Albuqerque, N. M. 

— Virgilina, Va. 

Mill bury, Mass. 

— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

_ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Troy, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

.. — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

..... Fredericksburg, Va. 
Burgess, Va. 



Gregory, Shirley Ann _ 

Greiner, Carol Irma — — 

Grenfell, Mary Lou ._ 

Griffith, Ann Page — 

Gross, Hermine Louise - 

Grove, Darlene Elizabeth ». 

Grove, Elizabeth Jane 

Grubbs, Ann Elizabeth ~. 

Grubbs, Lucille Gordon 

Grumbly, Mary Elizabeth ~ „. 

Gumbart, Eleanor Elting 

Gump, Mary Louise 

Gunn, Sandra Jean — ~ 

Gunther, Frances Smith 



Jersey City, N. J. 
~ West Orange, N. J. 

„ Beckley, W. Va. 

. Flemingsburg, Ky. 
..... Waynesboro, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 

York, Penn. 

Woodford, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

...... Martinsville, Va. 

Hopewell, Va. 

... Falls Church, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Hanover, Penn. 

Strasburg, Va. 

„... Norfolk, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

So. Norwalk, Conn. 

Corning, N. Y. 

.... St. Albans, W. Va. 

Ft. Worth, Texas 

Irvington, Va. 



Mobile Ala. 

...... Arlington, Va. 

... Richmond, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 

Vinton, Va. 

Cascade, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 



Register of Students 



155 



Haley, Jerry Lee 

Hall, Margaret Elizabeth .-. 

Hamilton, Barbara Morrisette 

Hamilton, Pauline - 

Hamilton, Shirley Margot ~ 

Hamm, Barbara Louise 

Hamm, Billie Jean - 

Hammann, Mary Jo 

Hammett, Sally 



Hammond, Barbara Anne 

Hamner, Nancy Carroll 

Hamric, Evelyn Kay - - 

Handleman, Betty Lou 

Hanel, Nancy Lee 



Haney, Mildred Gladys 

Hanger, Sally Fan 

Hanna, Nancy Lee 

Hanning, Florence Anne ..... 

Hannon, Carolyn Kay 

Hannon, Mary Eleanor 

Hanselman, Louise Marion 
Haralson, Barbara Anne .-. 



Ashland, Va. 

.... Fredericksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

San Francisco, Calif. 
_.„. Floral Park, N. Y. 
«. Stone Harbor, N. J. 

Montvale, Va. 

. Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Washington, D. C. 

_ Oakland, N. J. 

-j Rock Castle, Va. 

Gassaway, W. Va. 

Warsaw, Va. 

M Suffolk, Va. 

Ruckersville, Va. 

,« Fairfax, Va. 

- Norfolk, Va. 

- Alexandria, Va. 

Alloy, W. Va 

Richmond, Va. 

Arena, N. Y. 

Sylacauga, Ala. 



Harder, Lois Maybelle — - - Fredericksburg, Va. 

Harper, Christine....- - ~ -West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Harper, Jean Carol..- - - -....Dry Fork, Va. 

Harrell, Barbara Kay — - Morristown, Tenn. 

Harrell , Beverly Arlene- - - - -.Norfolk , Va. 

H arr ingto n , M ary S imrns...... - - - - N o r f o 1 k , V a . 

Harris, Arthur - ~ Dahlgren, Va. 

Harris, Florine E - — — Alexandria, Va. 

Harris, Joanne Lee — — - Arlington, Va. 

Harris, Mary Anne...- Richmond, Va. 



Harrison, Joann Shaw.... 

Harrison, Peggy Jane 

Hart, Elizabeth Massie.. 
Hart, Sonia Bodine 



Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Cape Charles, Va. 

North Garden, Va. 

Irvingston, N. J. 

New Hope, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Columbia, S. C. 



Harvill, Lola Rebecca.- — ...- 

Hase, Shirley Grayson 

Hatfield, Patricia Lucille „ 

Hathaway, Laura Eleanor _ Chatham, N. J. 

Hawkins, Nancy Teagarden „ Alexandria, Va. 

Hawley, Elizabeth Ray...- „ Fron t Royal , Va. 

Haymes, Patsy Ann- - - ..„ Chatham, Va. 

Hays, Tamara Lyn - - — Hopewell, Va. 

Headley, Frieda Anne — „ Mundy Point, Va. 

Heap, Jane Suzanne — Arlington, Va. 

Hearns, Charles B „ - _ - Dahlgren, Va. 

Heath, Joan Ann „ Leaminster, Mass. 

Heer, Carole Helen Marie - Dublin, Va. 

Heflin, Patricia Anne - Fredericksburg, Va. 

Heinlein, Shirley Louise - Alexandria, Va. 

Hellberg, Mary Ann Franklin, Va. 

Helm, Patricia Maybelle— „ - Norfolk, Va. 

Henry, Anne „ Roanoke, Va. 

Henson, Patricia Bea - „.„ Norfolk, Va. 

Heretick, Martha Rose Hopewell, Va. 

Herndon, Christine Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hess, Elizabeth Arrington Pittsburgh, Penn. 



156 



Mary Washington College 



Hickox, Dorcas Ann.. 
Hicks, Sarah Louise. 

Hill, Era Jean 

Hill, Virginia A 

Hines, Joyce.. 



Hipp, Catherine Marie 
Hite, Mary Ann.. 



..Washington, D. C. 

Alberta, Ala. 

— Herndon, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Abingdon, Va. 

.Norfolk, Va. 



Hoagland, Dorothy Jane— 

Hoback, Maydene Ann. 

Hodges, Helen Katherine 
Hoen, Katherine Lloyd. 



.Clarksburg, W. V.a 

Winchester, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

.Baltimore, Md. 



Hoffman, Nancy Blair „ Baltimore, Md. 

Hogaboom, Cretchen Margaret _ „ Camp Lejeune, N. C. 

Hoke, Jo Ann Covington, Va. 

Hoke, Martha Jane.... Tulsa, Okla. 

Holcomb, Ann Margaret „ Wytheville, Va. 

Holland, Barbara Gray „ „ Richmond, Va. 

Hollibaugh, Debra Larkin Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hollifield, June Shirley — _ Martinsville, Va. 



Hollister, Beverley Anne 

Holmes, Anne Jacqueline 

Holsten, Geraldine Dawn 

Holt, Ruth M., Mrs 

Homer, Patricia Lee „ 

Hood, Florence E 

Hook, Constance Lee 



—.Falls Church, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

New York, N. Y. 

Arlington, Va. 

Newark, Ohio 

.Virginia Beach, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 



Hopkins, Peggy Anne 

Horst, Joanne Helen 

Horton, Helen Ruth 

Horton, Orlean Roberta 

Hoskins, Barbara Jo.. 



Houck, Adalaide Abney 

Howard, Jane Charlotte 

Howard, John D — 

Hubbard, Marilyn Patricia — 

Hubbard, Nancy Redmond— 

Hudgins, Virginia Dare 

Huff, Barbara Sue 



Huff, Katherine Alice 
Hughes, Irene 



Huncke, Junstine. 

Hundemann, Winifred Elizabeth.. 

Hungerford, Priscilla 

Hunter, Ann Harrington 

Hunter, Jane Allene 

Hyatt, Barbara Ann — 



Imer, Donna Mildred. 

Inge, Rosa Martin 

Irby, Emily Anne 



Lynchburg, Va. 

— Fredericksburg, Va. 

Roswell, N. Mex. 

Roswell, N. Mex. 

Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Newville, Penn. 

—Haddonfields, N. J. 

Quantico, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

..Clyde Park, Montana 

Port-Haywood, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Warminster, Va. 

Manhasset, N. Y. 

Carteret, N. J. 

Tunica, Miss. 

Gates Mills, Ohio 

Glen Allen, Va. 



Irby, Mary Cynthia 

Ireland, Joaquine Betty — 
Irvin, Florence Elizabeth. 



Jackson, Sally Ann- 
Jacob, Esther Mapp„ 
James, Janet Bell. 



—Waynesboro, Penn. 

—Fredericksburg, Va. 

Kenbridge, Va. 

Blackstone, Va. 

Farmville, Va. 

Pittsburgh, Penn. 

.Williamsport, Penn. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Exmore, Va. 

.Staunton, Va. 



James, Vivian Janice 
Jarvie, Marilyn 



Malverne, N. Y. 

Arlington, Va. 



Register of Students 



157 



Jenkins, Allora Lee.. 



.-Springfield, Penn. 

Sussex, Va. 

.Long Beach, Calif. 

Glen Allen, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

.Hopewell, Va. 



Jenkins, Betty Lou. 
Jenkins, Marion McGuire.. 

Jinkins, Barbara Dale 

John, Ruth Joan 

Johnson, Ann Cordelia- 

Johnson, Barbara Ann - ~. Richmond, Va. 

Johnson, Betty Ford.- ~ - Roanoke, Va. 

Johnson, Betty Leigh - Windsor, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

- Worcester, Mass. 

- - Gate City, Va. 

„ - Atlanta, Ga. 



Johnson, Jane Taylor — 
Johnson, Kathleen Mary- 
Johnson, Linda. 



Johnson, Nancy Jane 

Johnson, Patricia Anne- 
Johnson, Patricia Irene- 
Johnston, Virginia Ann- 
Jolly, Shirley Fay„ -. 

Jones, Arthur.. 



Jones, Barbara Louise. 

Jones, Doris Mae -.. 

Jones, Eleanor Rae — 
Jones, Gladys Ann. 



Jones, Josephine Blandford. 

Jones, Marion Jayne 

Jordan, Betty Lou 

Jordan, Polly Ann. 



.._... Gordonsville, Va. 

Covesville, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

Salisbury, Md. 

Amherst, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

Templeman, Va. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

Dante, Va. 



Josephs, Patricia Louise.. 
Justis, Beatrice Virginia... 
Justis, Willie Marshall.... 

Karch, Nancy Eleanor. 

Kasel, Helen Louise 

Kavakich, Nicholas— 

Kay, Anna Nash— 
Keeley, Roy, Jr.. 



Keenan, Patricia Ann 

Keesee, Betty Leigh 

Kafauver, Patricia Lee 

Kehaya, Mary H 

Kelley, Ellen Joyce 

Kelley, Patricia Jane 

Kelly, Jane Miranda. 



Kelly, Maureen Catherine. 

Kemper, William A 

Kendall, Barbara Ann 

Kendall, Mary Gary 

Kerrick, Patricia Harford... 

Kerrins, Joan Marie 

Kimball, Beverly Jean 

Kincaid, Emil V 



McLean, Va. 

Onancock, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

.Washington, Mo. 

Quantico, Va. 

-...Norfolk, Va. 
-Washington, D. C. 

Doylestown, Pa. 

.Lynch Station, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Athens, Greece 

Jamesville, Va. 

Wyoming, N. Y. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Teaneck, N. J. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

— Ontario, Canada 

Wide Water, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Kinch, Margaret Johnson 

King, Doris Irene 

King, Katherine Elizabeth— 
Kirby, Doris Ann. 



Kirch, Barbara Jane 

Kirkwood, Virginia Ingles 

Kirson, Margaret Jenifer. 

Kleinknecht, Joan Elizabeth. 
Kloman, Olivia Lewis 



.Colonial Heights, Va. 

Occoquan, Va. 

Worcester, Mass. 

.Nathalie, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

.Silver Spring, Md. 

-Falls Church, Va. 

-Sterling, Va. 



Baltimore, Md. 

.Bridgeport, Conn. 
— Alexandria, Va. 



i 5 8 



Mary Washington College 



Klouda, Gertrude Mary Rose. 

Knapp, Sue Fleet 

Kodet, Marjorie Jean 

Kohn, Page. 



Kolton, Carole Joyce 

Koopmann, Katherine Laura. 

Korschgen, Jean Shirley 

Kowalzyk, Barbara Anne 

Krecker , S uzan n e~ 



Krise, Christina Lanier- 
Kusterer, Martha Anne.. 



Cambria Heights, N. Y. 

Richmond, Va. 

.... Manhasset, N. Y. 

Richmond, Va. 

Miami, Fla. 

Washington, D. C. 

Fairfax, Va. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Philadelphia, Penn. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 



Richmond, Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

-Fredericksburg, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Gilbertsville, N. Y. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Greenwood, Va. 

-Bloxom , Va. 

-.Fredericksbug, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

- -.Hopewell, Va. 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Jamaica, Va. 



,.— Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fort Monroe, Va. 



Kyle, Phyllis Donaldson 

Lacy, Mary Jo ~ 

Lalor, Frances Margaret „ 

Lamont, Richard Allen „ - 

Land, Betsy Ross 

Land , Ka th erine D u ke - 

Landefeld, Jacqueline Anne — 

Lane, Neil H arr ison — 

Langhorne, Suzanne Dabney „ 

Lankford, Sal ly Ann 

Lapsl ey , M i 1 dr ed Jam eson 

Larcombe, Electa Bacon — 

Lawrence, A lberta Jeanine — 

Lawrence, Beverly Dornford.. - - — ~ 

Leavell, Charlotte A 1 ice _.- 

Lee, Frances Carol ine - 

Lee, Luna Virginia .„ : - 

Lee, Marion Hoyt - - 

Lee, William R.- - Arlington, Va. 

Leftwich, Mary Farrier — „ „ „ Connellsville, Penn. 

LeHardy, Linda - — Annapolis, Md. 

LeRoux, Helen Jane - - - - Hampton, N. H. 

Lesser, Helene Nancy - Washington, D. C. 

Levey, Anne Snellen.- „ Richmond, Va. 

Levin, Arlene Hannah So uthampton, N. Y. 

Levin, Eunice - Baltimore, Md. 

Lewis, Betty Jane „ _ - — Lovettsville, Va. 

Lewis, Gretchen Ann - — Cape Charles, Va. 

Lewis, Nancy - King George, Va. 

Liepold, Max ine Wolff Selma, Ala. 

Lindauer, Carolyn Harvey — Portsmouth, Va. 

Lindsey, Doris Ann - „. Goby, Va. 

Linn, Ro ber t a M a e....„ Land isb u rg, Penn. 

L i p p y , J ea n Cad 1 e —. Fred er ick , M d. 

Lippy, Jeanne O A rl ington , Va. 

Lipscomb, Helen Patricia _ _ Waynesboro, Va. 

Li vesa y , Cornel ia El iza beth Waynesboro, Va. 

Livingstain, Ann ....Charleston, S. C. 

Livingston, Elizabeth Dorothy —.Haver Hill, Mass. 

Livingston, Susan Marie - „.— Alexandria, Va. 

Lloyd, Jane Marie - ~ Raleigh, N. C. 

Long, Edna Frances - Richmond, Va. 

Long, Shirley Caroline - Winchester, Va. 

Lopez, Neida Iris , Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Loughrey, Eleanor Frances Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Lova 1 1 , Patricia Hope...- - Suff ern, N. Y. 



Register of Students 



*59 



Lovelace, Ann 

Lowther, Margaret Ann. 

Loyd, Anne Carruth — 

Lucas, Barbara Ann 

Lucas, Despina Jean 

Lund, Jane Ann 

Lyle, Martha Belle 



Arlington, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

....Summerville, S. C. 

Washington, D. C. 

.Newport News, Va. 
..........lArlington, Va. 

Goshen, Va. 



McAchren, Gayle Webster— _ .. . Herndon , Va. 

McAllister, Jane Lee Salisbury, Md. 

McCann, Alorious Anne . ~ Richmond, Va. 

McCann, Joyce Eleanor — Brigantine, N. J. 

McCarthy, John A .. . . — Washington, D. C. 

McClintock, Betty Jane Ella.. — ......Haddonfield, N. J. 

McCoy, Dorothy Nell .. ~ — Roanoke, Va. 

McDaniel, Jo Anne . Cave Springs, Va. 

McDonald, Patricia Anne . — Waynesburg, Penn. 

McDonald , Sh irley Diane ... . — A rl i n gton , Va. 

McDonough, Joseph James — . — Arlington, Va. 

McElwee, Roxie Belle . „ Healing Springs, Va. 

McFarland, Barbara Ann Norfolk, Va. 

McGiboney, Nancy Belle — .. ...Westernport, Md. 

McGrath, Katherine Jane . — Alexandria, Va. 

Mcllwain, Dorothy Chaworth Bal ton, S. C. 

McKey, Patricia Ann „ „ Washington, D. C. 

McLaughlin, Elizabeth Allen — Staunton, Va. 

McMaster, David D., Jr — _ Occoquan, Va. 

McMullen, Donna Loi Barboursville, Va. 

. ...Reedville, Va. 

... Fredericksburg, Va. 

McPherson, Josephine Portsmouth, Va. 

McRoberts, Margaret Soutter „ „ .. „ Norfolk, Va. 

MacDonald, Mary Ellen .Warwick, Va. 

MacDougall, Mary Ann..... „ Doswell, Va. 

Machelor, Patricia Moran „ ...Eggertsville, N. Y. 

Mackay, Jessie — New London, Conn. 

MacManus, Margaret Jane.. Union, N. J. 

Maier, Betty Lou Chatham , N. J. 

Maliaros, Irene Norfolk, Va. 



McNeal, Elizabeth Lackey. 
McNutt, Peggy Baker. 



Malone, Claire Pitser — 
Mancini, Virginia Ann 

Mapp, Sue Holland 

Marco, Virginia Ann 



.Birmingham, Ala. 
.Waterbury, Conn. 



.Machipongo, Va. 

Winchester, Va. 

Marion, Beverlee Jeanne Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Marshall, Elizabeth Darley... „ „. Mobile, Ala. 

Martin, Barbara Ann... Henrico, Va. 

Martin, Carolyn Louise Charleston, W. Va. 



Martin, Catherine Walker... 

Martin, Edith Joan 

Martin, Kay Van Dyke 

Martin, Mary Anne 

Martin, Sarah Stone... 

Mask, Sarah Harriett 

Mason, Elizabeth Anne 



...Roanoke, Va. 

.. Washington, D. C. 

...Parkersburg, W. Va. 

West Point, Va. 

Johnson City, Tenn. 

...Columbus, Ga. 

Montross, Va. 



Mason, Elizabeth Betty Ann Roanoke, Va. 

Mason, Joyce Anne...... „ Scottsville, Va. 

Massie, Doris Kristina „ ..Newport News, Va. 

Mathis, Barbara Katherine.. .Washington, D. C. 



i6o 



Mary Washington College 



Matthes, Elizabeth Cornells 

Matthews, Mary Jane 

Matzenger, Shirley Mae 

Mawhinney, Anna L- 



.Conway, S. C. 
-Staunton, Va. 
...-Mobile, Ala. 



Maxwell, Beverley Chichester- 

Maxwell, Charlotte Rita 

Maxwell, Marion Mr „ 

Maynard, Delance Elizabeth 

Mayo, Betty Lou 

Mead, Barbara Jean- 

Mead, Mary Armistead 

Mears, Leah Ray.. 



Bethesda, Md. 

Lumberton, N. C. 

Bedford, Va. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

. — Old Saybrook, Conn. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Fairfax , Va. 



- MacPherson, Ga. 

- Norfolk, Va. 

Melillo, Phyllis Caroline —New Haven, Conn. 

Melton, Nancy Jeanne „„ Bryan, Ohio 

Membert , Joan Elaine „ Silver Spring, Md. 

Mensch , Barbara New York, N. Y. 

Merritt, Anne Elaine — Westmont, N. J. 

Merritt, Audrey Fay— Slate Hill, N. Y. 

Meskimen, John K - ~ Arlington, Va. 

Middlecamp, Marianne Helene „ Roanoke, Va. 

Mihm, Betty Anne „- Baltimore, Md. 



Millar, Margaret Kent 

Miller, Antoinette Beaton- 
Miller, Carolyn Ann 

Miller, Forrest 

Miller, Ida K _ 

Miller, Laura Ann 

Miller Nancy Jean 

Miller, Peggy Anne 

Miller, Ruth Ann 

Miller, Virginia Woodard.. 

Miller, William R 

Milligan, Mary Liesser 

Milne, Meredith Rogers 

Milster, Laura Hester- 
Minor, Christine Anne- 
Minor, Marian Thomas.. 
Miser, Carolyn Lee., 



Mitchell, Ann Katharine- 
Mitchell, Carlene Hope- 

Momm, Barbara Jean 

Moncure, Maude Carley- 

Montano, Yolanda 

Moody, Edith Mae 

Moody, Mary Annette 

Mooney, Geraldine E 

Moore, Ben N 

Moore, Dixie Anne 



Moore, Elizabeth Wever- 

Moore, Jimmie Lou 

Moore, Mary Ann- 



Moore, Mary Elizabeth. 
Moore, Mary Lewis.. 



Moorman, Frances Jeanette.. 

Mordecai, Mary Lane 

Morey, Mary Catherine 

Morgan, Ann Green. 



Charlottesville, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

-Chambersburg, Penn. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

-Quantico, Va. 

Alloy, W. Va. 

Purceville, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

.Baltimore, Md. 

Arlington, Va. 

Quantico, Va. 

Montgomery, Ala. 

..Arlington, Va. 

lexandria, Va. 

.-Richmond, Va. 

-Richmond, Va. 

.Annapolis, Md. 

Arlington, Va. 

Ashland, Va. 

-Key West, Fla. 
Arlington, Va. 



.Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Petersburg, Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Woodstock, Va. 

Abingdon, Va. 
?alls Church, Va. 

—Worcester, Mass. 

.Howardsville, Va. 

...-Kilmarnock, Va. 



Morgan, Ellen Fauntleroy- 



-Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Maywood, N. J. 

Bedford, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 



Register of Students 



161 



Morgan, Joan Elizabeth— 

Morgen, Joan Lee 

Morris, Helen Jane 

Morris, Patricia Ruth 

Morrison, Rosemary 

Mosher, Nancy Corr 

Moskos, Mary.. 



Mothershead, Betty Lee- 
Motley, Lydia Sue — 

Mott, Sara Lucinda 



Mueller, Caroline Rose 

M ull igan , Marigenc - 

Mullins, Ruth Virl „« 

Munden, Linda Merle 

Munn, Martha Carol.™ 

Murphy, Patricia Ann 

Musselman, Barbara Joan... 



.._ Richmond, Va. 

Washington, D. C. 

Williamsport, Penn. 

Blacksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Mendham, N. J. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Downings, Va. 

..Anderson Heights, Va. 

...Bellamy, Va. 

Manhasset, N. Y. 

Beaufort, S. C. 

— Roanoke, Va. 

-....Norfolk, Va. 

Columbus, Ga. 

Arlington, Va. 

Broward, Fla. 



Nash, Elizabeth Ida. 
Nash, Phyllis Agnes.- 
Nathanson, Marilyn. 



Neate, Mary Maguder 

Nederkorn, Winston LeMoyne.. 

Nelson, Kenneth L 

Neumyer, Diane Mary 

Newbill, Annie Tatum 

Newhall, Nancy..... 



— Lerty, Va. 

.Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Arlington, Va. 

- Aberdeen, Md. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Bethesda, Md. 

- Wirtz, Va. 



—Winchester, Mass. 

Spotsylvania, Va. 

- - Laurel Springs, N. J. 

- „ Keller, Va. 

- - Richmond, Va. 

„ Arlington, Va. 

.. — — Warwick, Va. 

Noland, Mary Landon ....._ Ashland, Va. 



Nicholls, Albert Charles 

Nicholson, Merilyn Ruth 

Nicolls, Margaret Mapp 

Niedermayer, Sally Eileen — 

Ninde, Ann Ash ton 

Nissley, Sarah McClue.. 



Nordstrom, Barbara Anne.. 
Norment, Clarence R., Jr.. 
Norris, Joan Marie 



Nottingham, Barbara Bennett... 
Nowak, Alona May. 



No well, Marie Louise 

Nuckols, Margaret Ann.. 

Nussey, Noel Eleanor 

Nye, Elizabeth Anne 

Nye, Nancy Lynd - 



.Belle Haven, Va. 

Occoquan, Va. 

.Kensington, Md. 

~ Ben Air, Va. 

Dunkirk, N. Y. 

_ Arlington, Va. 

Gretna, Va. 

.Brooklyn, N. Y. 



- Cape Charles, Va. 

...Cape Charles, Va. 



Oakley, Elizabeth Collins 

Oberholtzer, Patricia Ann.... 
O'dell, Nancy Anne.. 



Warsaw, Va. 



.Norristown, Penn. 

Frankfort, Ky. 

O'Keeffe, Irene Anne - - - Washington, D. C. 

Olson, Barbara Janet - Paramus, N. J. 

Olzack, Eleanor Louise™ -. 

O'Mara, Mary Louise 

Opie, Fitshugh Lee- 

O'Rear, Colleen Louise 

Orem, Alice Evelyn 

Osborne, Carolyn Elizabeth. 
O'Shea, Mary Eileen. 



Osius, Patricia Louisa... 



..Beaver Falls, Penn. 

,-. Richmond, Va. 

-Alexandria, Va. 

_ Arlington , Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

— — Springfield, Va. 

Babylon, N. Y. 

— Miami Beach, Fla. 



162 



Mary Washington College 



Otway, Mary Beth.. 
Owen, Thomas W. 



Wilton, Conn. 

— Quantico, Va. 



Pack, Glenna Rae Christian. 

Packett, Sue Ellen 

Pailet, Suzanne — 

Painter, Patricia Anne 

Palmer, Pauline Lorraine 

Papstein, Mary Margaret 

Parcells, Sara Jane 

Park, Alice Marie _. 

Parmelee, Nancy Ruth 

Parrott, Robert K 

Parrotta, Charlene Joan „ 

Parsegh ian , Margaret.„ „... 

Parson, Willie Dee 

Pascal, Barbara Lou 



Patrick, Beverly Ruth 

Patteson, Mary Lyon 

Pattie, Mary Alice 

Payne, Ann Lewis 

Payne, Gladys Winifred- 

Payne, Janet Lee 

Payne, J. M 

Pearman, Helen Louise 

Peck, Helen Oleta ~... 

Peck, Marylewis Gaulding- 

Peed, Martha Sue 

Peel, Nancy Joy 

Perkins, Barbara Ann 

Perkinson, Ann Elizabeth- 
Perry, Faye Marie 

Perry, Sarah Dale 

Pershing, Joan Marie 

Peru, Elaine Catherine 

Peter, Esther Elizabeth 

Peters, Gayle Patmore 

Petley, Carole Edith 

Petro, Anastasia.— — 

Peyton, Jean Partello 

Phelps, B. Arlene 

Phillips, Barbara Jean. 



.McDowell City, W. Va. 

Montross, Va. 

New Orleans, La. 

Quantico, Va. 

Co wart, Va. 

... Oradell, N. J. 

..New Providence, N. J. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Windsor, Conn. 

Arlington, Va. 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

Ellerson, Va. 

Caracas, Venezuela 

^Queens Village, N. Y. 

-..Billings, N. Y. 

— . Manteo, Va. 

Gates Mills, Ohio 

Front Royal, Va. 

Marshall, Va. 

Ashburn, Va. 

Dahlgren , Va. 

Richmond , Va. 

.Logan, W. Va. 



Phillips, Catherine Eugenia.... 

Phillips, Elaine Marie 

Phillips, Jacqueline Jeanne. 

Phillips, Lucy Abbie 

Phillips, Nancy Lee 

Piedmont, Joan Carol 

Pinckney, Hilda Jean 

Pinker, John 



Pitts, Ellen Rebekah 

Pitts, Peggy Earle 

Piatt, Marilyn 

Pleasants, Marion Winifred. 
Plotkin, Beverly- 



P 1 o tn ick, Norman 

Poarch, Nancy Ann 

Pollock, Eleanor Marcia., 



Virginia Beach, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Glen Allen, Va. 

Crewe, Va. 

Huntington, W. Va. 

.-Logan, W. Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

McKees Rocks, Penn. 

Prince George, Va. 

The Plains, Va. 

Madison, N. J. 

Morristown, Tenn. 

„~. Arlington , Va. 

Birmingham, Mich. 

Pineville, W. Va. 

Tappahannock, Va. 

-...Richmond, Va. 

Mannington, W. Va. 

— Leesburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

A u born, N. J. 

Dahlgren , Va. 

Lancaster, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Bolivar, N. Y. 

Richmond, Va. 

Trumbull, Conn. 

Washington, D. C. 

Lawrenceville, Va. 

Richmond , Va. 



Register of Students 



163 



Poole, Judith Hubbard 

Poole, Marlynn — — „ _.. 

Poole, Virginia Mae 

Pope, Carol Ann. 



Porcher, Martha MitcheL 

Porter, Phyllis Ann „.. 

Poston, Marjory Ann 

Poteet, Elizabeth 



Potter, Richard R 

Potts, Nancy Duvall — 
Poulson, Patricia May- 
Powell, Catherine V — 
Powell, Dorothy V. M. 
Powell, Ida Anne.. 



.Torrington, Conn. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Providence, R. I. 

Hopewell, Va. 

Pinopolis, S. C. 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

._. -Arlington, Va. 

Pearisburg, Va. 

Dahlgren, Va. 

.Lynchburg, Va. 



Waynesboro, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.Temperanceville, Va. 

Powell, Katherine Louise — Fairfax, Va. 

Powell, Pamela Damon - Wesport, Conn. 

Powers, Susan Gatewood.- - ~ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Pozner, Bette Ann„ ....New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Prasse, John Herman - — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Pratt, Eleanor Jean- Arlington , Vo. 

Pritchard, Barbara Karen „- Miami, Fla. 

Pruden, Virginia Frances™. — — — Chase City, Va. 

Pugh, Peggy Joyce. Orange, Va. 

Puller, Mary Lou — ~ - ~ Richmond, Va. 

Pulley, Barbara Ann .. Warsaw, Va. 

Purdy, June Frances Rumson, N. J. 

Putnam, Carol Field - Santa Ana, Calif. 



Quelch, Susan 

Quesinberry, Dana Martin..... 
Quinn, Barbara Catherine. — 
Quinones, Ana Maria 



Gordonsville, Va. 

Stuart, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

.Ponce, Puerto Rico 



Radack, Cynthia Lu 

Rainey, Minnie Brooks 

Raitt, Loudell Nichols Boyd 

Rakes, Nancy Jean 

Ramsey, Anne Wetherbee 

Ramsey, Nell Cobb 

Rand, Betty 

Randolph, Marguerite Treva~ — 

Raper, Martha Campbell 

Rashbrook, Lois Marie ._ 

Ratchford, Mary Alice 

Rawlett, Lovel Madison™ 

Ray, Laurie Jean„ .. 

Raynor, Betty Anne 



Titusville, Penn. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Leesburg, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

„ Ivor, Va. 

Garner, N. C. 

.Dhamran, Saudi Arabia 
Richmond, Va. 



Rearden, Helen Henrietta-... 

Redman, Lucy Mac 

Reese, Jacquelin Heath 

Reese, Mabel Eleanor 

Reese, Shirley Galen 

Reeve, Judy Amelia 

Reisig, Dorothy Eugenia 

Resch, Ann Virginia 

Rexrode, Sally Ann ~ „ 

Reynolds, Betye Arlene— 

Reynolds, Helen Margaret 



Bemus Point, N. Y. 

Aiken, S. C. 

— Colonial Beach, Va. 

- Sylacauga, Ala. 

— Charlottesville, Va. 

.- ~ Jacksonville, Fla. 

„ Bangor, Maine 

Petersburg, Va. 

Newport News, Va. 

.- -.Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Eastport, N. Y. 

« Asheville, N. C. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

~ Marlington, W. Va. 

— Richmond, Va. 

- — Miami, Fla. 



164 



Mary Washington College 



Reynolds, Ruth Joyce- 
Rhodes, Jo Anne- 



Richards, Shirley Janice- 
Richards, Virginia Dale 
Richadson, Alice Lillian- 
Richardson, Evelyn Page. 
Richardson, Nancy Jane.. 
Richter, Ellen Anne 



— Baltimore, Md. 

Arlington, Va. 

.....Alexandria, Va. 
..-.Petersburg, Va. 

Belleville, 111. 

— —Atkins, Va. 



Ricketts, Joanne Rivers 

Rigby, Constance Ann.. 



.New Windsor, Md. 

Arlington, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

.Richmond, Va. 



Roberts, Frances Burwell.... 

Roberts, Helen French..... 

Roberts, Pam ela 

Roberts, Pauline Stella 

Robertson, Ann Bryan 

Robertson, Louise Wilkes.. 
Robinson, Dorell Bertha.— 



Rinehart , Mary Janet.... „ Washington, D. C. 

Rivers, Jimmie Emeline Arlington, Va. 

Robbins, Gladys Louise - - Emporia, Va. 

- - ~ Chase City, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Bryn Mawr, Penn. 

Richmond, Va. 

_ Bedford, Va. 

Havertown, Penn. 

Rochlitz, Ruth Ann ._ Baltimore, Md. 

Rodgers, Tommie Lou..._ Mt. Hope, W. Va. 

Rogers, Beverly Lee „ Franklin, Va. 

Rohrbach, Anne Lou „ Reading, Penn. 

Roll, Sara Louise _ Richmond, Va. 

Roller, Elizabeth Frances New Alexandria, Va. 

Rollins, Joan EtheL - Falls Church, Va. 

Root, Nancy Dickerman Mount Carmel, Conn. 

Roper, Patricia Ann Warwick, Va. 

Rosanelli, Marie Louise.- — Richmond, Va. 

Rose, Virginia May. Long Beach , Calif. 

Rossien, Grace Marcia.. „ Kew Gardens, N. Y. 

Rountree, Elizabeth Alice „ Suffolk, Va. 



Rouse, Ann Nelson 

Rowell, Jeanne E - 

Royster, Julia Ann 

Royston, Ellen Imogene 

Rozmarynowska, Katherine Maria. 

Rubins, Jo DeMarest 

Russell, Julia Joan _._ 

Russell, Mildred Ives 

Russell, Nina Mae 

Russell, Ruth Allene GlasettlL... 

Ryder, Eleanor Dowling 

Ryder, Margaret Ann 



— Lexington, Ky. 

— Surry, Va. 

..Winston-Salem, N. C. 

„ Arlington , Va. 

Greenbush, Va. 

Annapolis, Md. 

Pocomoke, Md. 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Charleston, W. Va. 

„ Gatlett, Va. 

— Norfolk, Va. 

_.. Orange, Va. 



Saegmuller, Sally Dandridge Warrenton, Va. 

Sager, Patricia Anne Richmond, Va. 

Saine, Kay Perry „ .North Tazewell, Va. 

Sale, Thomas Battaile, Jr .. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Salsbury, Helen Lee Richmond, Va. 

Sammons, Bobbie Jean. 



.Princeton, W. Va. 

Sams, Betty Bonner .Statesville, N. C. 

Sanders, Audrey Elizabeth „ —Fredericksburg, Va. 

Sasher, Marianne..™ — Arlington, Va. 



Saunders, Ann Stokes.... 

Saunders, Patricia 

Saunders, Patsy Jolene.. 



Richmond, Va. 

-Washington, D. C. 
„.. Roanoke, Va. 



Register of Students 



165 



Sayers, Jacq uely n — 

Scarburgh, Caroline Jamison. 

Schad, Patricia Ann 

Schaefers, Rita Hendrika 



Schauer, Margaret Mary~ 

Schenk, Dorothea Rita 

Schermerhorn, Floy Mann, Mrs. 

Schlesinger, Joan Barbara 

Schmitz, Elaine Carole — 

Schnare, Margaret E „.. 

Schuler, Irene Melitta 

Schulze, Gretchen Eugual — 

Schwarz, Jayne Sandra 

Scott, Jewell Lockhart — 

Scott, Nancy Jo.. 



Grundy, Va. 

-Accomac. Va. 

Bellefonte, Penn. 

..Great Neck, N. Y. 
..-Falls Church, Va. 
....Fair Haven, N. J. 
..Washington, D. C. 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Union, N. J. 

Lexington, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

The Plains, Va. 



Seekamp, Marion Ruth — 

Seeley, Edna Hamilton™. 

Seelman, Suzanne L 



.Lynnfield Center, Mass. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.Louisville, Ky. 



West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Alexandria , Va. 

...Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Seibert, Patricia Ann Greenfield, Mass. 

Seifert, Marilyn.™ - - Emporia, Va. 

Seitz, Patricia Woodward Washington, D. C. 

Shaffer, Norma Jean New Cumberland, Penn. 

Shank, Shirley Klaine Titusville, Penn. 

Shelhouse, Suzanne Worthington_ - „ Richmond, Va. 

Shel ton , Mary Alberta...- Norfolk , Va. 

Shepherd, George E Quantico, Va. 

Sheppe, Nancy Carolyn „ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Sheriff, Susan Soper „ Richmond, Va. 

Shevitz, Barbara Frame ~ ™ ~ Richmond, Va. 

Shipley, Patricia Ann ~ _ „ -Baltimore, Md. 



Shipman, Sarah Belle 

Shivers, Anne Barry 

Shope, Nancy Lynn 

Shotton, Barbara Ann — 
Shumate, Elizabeth Ann.. 
Siegel, Doris Ellen. 



Sigmon, Christie Gill — 

Simmonds, Ellice Adelaide 

Simmons, Ann Leighton 

Simpson, Doris Renn 

Simpson, Rophelia _ 

Sinnard, Shirley Mae 

Sipe, Carolyn Amadot.™ 

Sipolski, Felicia Rose 

Skellchock, John P 

Skinner, Evelyn Marie 

Slater, Corenne 

Sloan, Peggy Ann 



.Moorestown, N. J. 

-JMarion, Ala. 

-Arlington, Va. 

Suffolk, Va. 

Covington, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 



Virginia Beach, Va. 

Hopewell , Va. 

.Norfolk, Va. 



..Washington, D. C. 
Augusta, Ga. 



Smalley, Barbara Herrick., 

Smallwood, Ann 

Smart, Alta Carolyn 

Smith, Anne Hammond™ 

Smith, Anne Royston 

Smith, Audrey Blair 

Smith, Barbara Dean 

Smith, Barbara Sue 

Smith, Carol Ann 

Smith, Charles G., Jr 



~ Lexington, Va. 

-.Quantico, Va. 

.Hammonton, N. J. 

™.Detroit, Mich. 

Arlington, Va. 

— Eastville, Va. 

...Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Aylett, Va. 

- Norfolk, Va. 

Phoenix, Md. 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 

— Minden, La. 

Alexandria, Va. 

...... Newport, R. I. 

Vienna, Va. 



166 Mary Washington College 



Smith, Dorothy May Fredericksburg, Va. 

Smith, Frances Elizabeth Grundy, Va. 

Smith, Frances Louise Norfolk, Va. 

Smith, Jean Tomkins Amherst, Va. 

Smith, Judith Emery Arlington, Va. 

Smith, Julia Hawks Salsbury, Conn. 

Smith, Marilyn Edith Norfolk, Va. 

Smith, Martha Lillian Morrison, Va. 

Smith, Mary Ellen Starr, S. C. 

Smith, Patricia Burnnette Falmouth, Va. 

Smith, Phyllis Blondell Falmouth, Va. 

Smith, Richard W Quantico, Va. 

Smith, Sophia Arnell Brock Road, Va. 

Smith, Zella Anne Poquoson, Va. 

Snellings, Patricia Ann Fredericksburg, Va. 

Snellings, Peggy Anne Fredericksburg, Va. 

Snyder, Marcia Lynn Woodbridge, Conn. 

Snyder, William D Warrenton, Va. 

Southall, Helen McLean, Va. 

Spear, Emma Lee Warwick, Va. 

Speck, Nancy Eleanor Greenville, Va. 

Spillman, Georgiana Virginia Washington, D. C. 

Spurlock, Elizabeth Jane Prestonsburg, Ky. 

Squire, Nancy Eleanor Richmond, Va. 

Stacey, Claudette Marie Caracas, Venezuela 

Starkey, Mary Ellen Quinton, Va. 

Staylor, Betty Joan Chuckatuck, Va. 

Steadham, Patricia Ann -...Gainesville, Fla. 

Stederman, Albert O Arlington, Va. 

Steele, Kenneth R Quantico, Va. 

Stein, JoAnn Marie Westfield, Mass. 

Stenhouse, Betty Ann Vienna, Va. 

Stephenson, Nancy Ann Warrenton, Va. 

Stephenson, Sylvia Joan Bishop, Va. 

Sterling, Doris Jean Parksley, Va. 

Stern, Irma Lee Newbedford, Mass. 

Stevenson, Esther Willis Cape Charles, Va. 

Stevenson , Joyce Crawford Towson , Md . 

Stewart, Anne Elizabeth Fredericksburg, Va. 

Stewart, Barbara Preston Portsmouth, Va. 

Stewart, Cynthia Rundell Salisbury, Md. 

Stewart, Martha Coyle Atlantic City, N. J. 

Stewart, Susan Carol Dalton, Mass. 

Stibaner, Eleanor Ann Webster, N. Y. 

Stivers, Marianne Louise Mt. Sidney, Va. 

Stoddard, Polly Cobb Monroe, N Y. 

Stokes, Diane Baltimore, Md. 

Stone, Elizabeth Beverly .....Ashland, Va. 

Stover, Betty Lee Staunton, Va. 

Strangmann, Barbara Jean „ Baltimore, Md. 

Straughan, Evelyn Sue Fredericksburg, Va. 

Strauss, Esther Rose Philadelphia, Penn. 

Strawser, Elaine Frances Falls Church, Va. 

Streeter, Marilyn Ruth Waddington, N. Y. 

Strother, Peggy Lois Berryville, Va. 

Stutts, Nina Mansfield Roanoke, Va. 

Styers, Barbara Joan Danville, Va. 

Suits, Genevieve Emily Havertown, Penn. 



Register of Students 



167 



Sullivan, Ann Carol 

Sullivan, Patricia Ann.— 

Supple, Shirley Jane - 

Swain, Patricia Elizabeth 

Sweig, Mary Ann. 



Sykes, Susan Jane „ 

Taber, Anne Bradeen „., 

Taggart, Dolores Elaine „ 

Taliaferro, Sarah Elizabeth-.. 

Tappy, Joann 

Tate, Eva Frances- „. 

Tatom, Marigene.. 



-Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Norfolk, Va. 

Greenville, Va. 

„ Arlington, Va. 

— Arlington, Va. 

..Arlington, Va. 



.West Kingston, R. I. 

, Richmond, Va. 

„ Eagle Pass, Texas 

Richmond, Va. 



Richmond, Va. 

...Alexandria, Va. 

Taylor, Margaret Bibb..™ „ „ - ..„ - ...Amherst, Va. 

Taylor, Marilyn Ann ~. „ Fairfax, Va. 



Taylor, Mary Estelle 

Taylor, Mary Lynn „ 

Taylor, Nancy Woodward— 

Tengzelius, Joan Mary -., 

Tenley, Lynn Dunbar.. 



Terrell, Shirley Woodson. 

Terrill, Clare Jane 

Terrill, Jane Wortham. 



Thacker, Shirley Anne....- 

Thackston , Virginia 

Thall, Francine Isobel 

Thomas, Cynthia Deane 

Thomas, Jeanne Fernando- 
Thomas, Mable Louise » 



Onancock, Va. 

- - Houston, Texas 

New Kent, Va. 

..Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

...- Hampton, Va. 

Ulysses, Kan. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Pendletons, Va. 



Thomason, Virginia Ann 

Thompson, Elizabeth Jane 

Thompson, Elizabeth Watkins.. 

Thompson, Joanne Boilvin 

Thorpe, Retta Mae _ 

Thurman, Jean TerrilL 

Tidwell, Joan Lee.. 



._. Front Royal, Va. 

.New London, Conn. 

Belleville, N. J. 

— Lawrenceville, Va. 

Farnham, Va. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

...Fredericksburg, Va. 

Rustburg, Va. 

—Miami, Fla. 

-Catlett, Va. 



Tierney, Daniel William, Lt... 
Timberlake, Maurice Arthur. 

Timmons, Barbara June 

Tingler, June Ann.... — 

Titus, Barbara Gay. 



.Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

River Road, Va. 

— —Ft. Meyer, Va. 

King George, Va. 

Hartwood, Va. 



Torres, Maria Teresa „. 

Towson, Laura Emory 

Trafieri, Dorothy Ann... 

Tread well, Mary Frances. 
Trinkle, Sue Cosby...... 



Covington, Va. 

.. New York, N. Y. 

.Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Sea Island, Ga. 



Triplett, Jacqueline Adair..... 
Trombley, Edna Ruth Ray- 
Trotter, Rosemary 

Trudeau, Mildred LaVern- 
Tsitsera, Athena 



Richmond, Va. 

..St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Alexandria, Va. 

—Portsmouth, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 
Lee Hall, Va. 



Tsitsera, Helen Theodore- 
Tucker, Doris June 

Turner, Beverly Ann.... 

Turner, Clara Ann.- 



Turner, Elizabeth Caroline. 

Turner, Jacqueline. 

Turner, Virginia Ann 

Tyson, Jean Page - 



Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Newport News, Va. 

Newport News, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

— - — Arlington , Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Chase City, Va. 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Elmont, Va. 



i68 



Mary Washington College 



Uhland, Ann Arnelda 

Uhler, Margaret Eliza 

Upshur, Eleanor Walton... 
Urquhart,, Ann Reynolds.. 
Utter back, Clara Mae 



.Bridgeton, N. J. 
....Annandale, Va. 



...Williamsburg, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 



Valentine, Lucille Wilson 

Van Buskirk, Dawn Lee. — 

Vane, Grace Elizabeth 

Van Patten, Julia Dula 

Venable, Mary Patricia 

Verblud, Joy Delaine 

Verling, Lois Jean~ 

Vincent, Charles Edward 

Vinzant, Martha Jane 

Vittingl, Valerie Virginia 

Vivian, Thomas Harold, Jr 

Voigt, Paul A 

Voorhis, Katrina 

Voronovsky, Irene Theodora. 



Lexington, Va. 

„Chambersburg, Penn. 

...Wilmington, Del. 

Norfolk, Va. 

.Hillsville, Va. 



.Wilkes-Barre, Penn. 

- Orange, Va. 

Dillon, S. C. 



Richmond, Va. 

..Spring Hill, Ala. 
.-...Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Quantico, Va. 

.Plainfield, N. J. 
.Schenectady, N. Y. 



Wadell, Joan Archer — 
Wagner, Virginia Mae.. 
Walker, Anne Ryland.... 

Walker, Betty Jean 

Wall, Evelyn Patricia-..., 

Wallace, Jean Small 

Walsh, Carol Lee 

Walton, Angela Irby 

Walton, Catherine Sandra 

Waltz, Patricia Ann 

Warner, Nancy Carol 

Warren, Shirley Jean — 

Watson, Caroline Newbold 

Watson, Joan Belin 

Watson, Joan Davis 

Watson, Sally Buckman 

Waugh, Sara Bland..- 

Weaver, Katherine Wyvonne 

Webb, Marjorie Dean - - 

Webb, Shirley Elizabeth— 

Webster, Lou Ellen 

Wefel, Mary Rutherford— 

Weir, Lillian Anne — 

Wells, Ellen Catherine - 

West, Eileen Frances - 

West, Nanalou — 

Westbrook, Otelia Marie — — 

Wharton, Virginia Hallett 

Wheeler, Anna May 

White, Carelyn Leavitt 

White, Jackson Hubbard 

White, Lucille Berenice 

White, Margaret Somerville 

Whitehurst, Jacquelyn Ann 

Whittemore, Mary Ann 

Whitten, Mary Lynn.. 
Wicker, Marilyn Simms 



Richmond, Va. 

Suffolk, Va. 

South Hill, Va. 

...Fredericksburg, Va. 
...Ashland, Va. 

.Haverford, Penn. 

-. Arlington, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

...- Norfolk, Va. 

— Catonsville, Md. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Danville, Va. 



„Wynnewood, Penn. 
Franklin, Va. 



— -Arlington, Va. 

...Wynnewood, Penn. 

_ Orange, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 

Madison, Conn. 

Machipongo, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Mobile, Ala. 

.- — Quantico, Va. 

Mattituck, N. Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Onley, Va. 

- Suffolk, Va. 

Harrisonburg, Va. 

-. Norfolk, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 



Xangley A. F. B., Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

.Back Bay, Va. 
.Blacksburg, Va. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

.Bellepoint, W. Va. 



Register of Students 



169 



Wilbur, Helen Louise 

Wilder, Nancy Calhoun 

Wiley, Amoret Ann 

Wiley, Jean Walker 

Wilkins, Esther Mae 

Wilkins, Helen Nottingham 

Wilkins, Jacqueline 

Wilkins, Kay Morgan — 

Williams, Alice Jean... 

Williams, Anne Harding 

Williams, Eva Wrenn -._ 

Williams, Josephine Jane Worthington. 

Williams, Martha Lee _ 

Williams, Maymie Claire ~ 

Williams, Ruth Frances — — - 

Williams, Sylvia Lee 

Williamson, Nancy Lee 

Wilson, Anne Roberta. 

Wilson, Barbara Ann 

Wilson, Gerald. 



Wimberly, Gladys Elaine 

Winborne, Mary Anne — 

Winstead, Elizabeth Gray 

Winston, Ann Gayle.- 

Wissert, Marjorie A 

Withers, Dorothy Anne.. 

Withers, Susan Claire. 

Witty, Sandra Ellen-. 
Wolfe, Dorothy Nell... 

Wood, Peggy Louise 

Wood, Sabra Ann~ 



Orlando, Fla. 

— -..Lexington, Ky. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Alexandria, Va. 

.. Luttrellville, Va. 

....Washington, D. C. 

Franklin, W. Va. 

..Hilton Village, Va. 

Beckley, W. Va. 

...Morristown, Tenn. 

.._ Capron, Va. 

—Waynesboro, Va. 

- .Franklin, Va. 

Reidsville, N. C. 

Back Bay, Va. 

Suffolk, Va. 

—Falls Church, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

— Punta Goroa, Fla. 

Occoquan, Va. 

.....College Park, Ga. 
.Newport News, Va. 
..Charlottesville, Va. 
— Clarksville, Va. 

Quantico, Va. 

..Waynesboro, Va. 

Syosset, N. Y. 

JRiverdale, N. Y. 
.Marion, Va. 



Woodall, Nancy Jacklyn 

Workman, Barbara Jane- 
Wright, Barbara Jeane~ 

Wright, Catherine Lee 

Wright, Edwina Louise- 
Wright, Phyllis Ann. 



Princess Anne, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Wright, Shirley Ann 

Wunder, Joyce Lorraine- 

Wygal, Barbara Ann 

Wysong, Sarah Bond - 



Danville, Va. 

Rockhill, S. C. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

Staunton, Va. 

Rhoadesville, Va. 

— Staunton, Va. 

..Staunton, Va. 

.Hampton, Va. 

—Suffolk, Va. 

-.Bel Air, Md. 



Yago, Elizabeth Ann 

Yates, Peggy Marie.. 



Yokogawa, Meechi SumL 

Young, Albert T., Jr 

Young, Elizabeth Ann 

Young, Janet Bowen.. 

Young, Joan Frances 

Young, Julia Ann 

Young, Luly Catherine- 



Zimmerman, Nancy Lou— 
Zundel, Eleanor Adelaide.. 



Beckley, W. Va. 

.Holcomb Rock, Va. 

Tokyo, Japan 

. Falls Church, Va. 

Emory, Va. 

Wilson, N. C. 

-.Fredericksburg, Va. 

-.Sanford, Va. 

...Fredericksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Bradenton, Fla. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

Summer 1952 

Anderson, Anne Frances „. Charlottesville, Va. 

Adams, Clara Estelle.™ _ Atlanta, Ga. 

Anderson, Margaret Patricia Sugar Grove, Va. 

Anderson, Patsy Ruth „ Petersburg, Va. 

Andrews, Lois Ann- .. „ _ Falmouth, Va. 

Arlook, Joyce Helenc Passaic, N. J. 

Armstrong, Frances Liebenow Fredericksburg, Va. 

Ashby, Lou Ann Exmore, Va. 

Bahen, George Edward, Jr „ Richmond, Va. 

Baldwin, Marilyn Holden New York, N. Y. 

Barney, Ann Sibley .... . .....Hilton Village, Va. 

Barsky, Harriet Lynn .....Brooklyn, New York 

Bates, Paul Arthur _ Birmingham, Ala. 

Bell, Vivian Marie — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Berkman, Bernice „ Richmond, Va. 

Black, Jane LaTrobe Elkton, Va. 

Blake, Ellen Lander Richmond, Va. 

Blankenship, Jan Petersburg, Va. 

Boggs, Welma Bumpass, Va. 

Bolin, Constance Beverly Grosse Pointe, Mich. 

Brady, Valerie Jeanne. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Broas, Pauline Georgianna Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Brooks, Virginia Gouldin Fredericksburg, Va. 

Broome, Imre Jo Danville, Va. 

Brown, Aubrey Neblett, III _.. Richmond, Va. 

Brown, Barbara Anne Roanoke, Va. 

Brown, Carol Stone Indialantic, Fla. 

Bruner, Elizabeth P Petersburg, Va. 

Bulley, Doreen Joan Fredericksburg, Va. 

Burchell , Bernard Theodore Dahlgren, Va. 

Calamos, George Nick Fredericksburg, Va. 

Callahan, Ann Frances — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Campbell, Barbara Elizabeth _ Sandidges, Va. 

Carder, Harold Franklin..... „.. Culpeper, Va. 

Carneal, Ethel Ruth „ ™ „ Penola, Va. 

Carver, Beatrice Ann... — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Cash, Elizabeth B Buena Vista, Va. 

Caverlee, Barbara June „ -Fredericksburg, Va. 

Chaffee, Mary Osborne — Arlington, Va. 

Chapman, Edwina Kent Smithfield, Va. 

Chinn, Janet Noonan — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Cockrell, Todd Rowe.™ _ Heathsville, Va. 

Coffey, Ada Lois Chase City, Va. 

Conway, Frances Marie „ .. Norfolk, Va. 

Corbett, Cora Pauline Ayden, N. C. 

Cornwell, Zella Eugene Manassas, Va. 

Costello, Emma Lee Richmond, Va. 

Covington, Gene Watkins _ Lottsburg, Va. 

Cowart, Robert Lafayette Portsmouth, Va. 

Cowne, Laura Boteler Midland, Va. 

Cramer, Patricia Wrenn Norfolk, Va. 

Cranford, Betty Louise Fort Bel voir, Va. 



Register of Students 



171 



Cross, Sara Jane— 
Cruise, Ilena Mae.. 



Dalton, Ruth Ann w „ 

Davis, Carmie Fuller „ — 

Davis, Mary Katherine 

Decker, Richard Henry, Jr _- . 

Dent, Barbara Lee 

Dodson, Thomas Ivan _.- 

Donahoe, Jean Elizabeth 

Drew, Benjamin Lucas, Jr.- - — 

Drew, Mary Frances 

D udley, Charlo t te „ — — — 

Dunn, Jane Byrd 

Eanes, Barbara Anne.™ _ - 

Eanes, Peggy Ann - 

Easley, Ruth Sergeant _ 

Edwards, Gertrude H - 

Elliott, Esther Cantrell -... 

Ellis, Gary LeRoy - — 

Embrey, Sadie Olena -.. 

Emmett, Marian.™ _ 

Emmons, Shirley Ann 

Evans, Joyce. 



-_ Lynch , Ky . 

Tazewell, Va. 



Pulaski, Va. 

..- Honake, Va. 

Honaker, Va. 

.Richmond, Va. 



..Fredericksburg, Va. 

„ Dahlgren, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

New York, N. Y. 

Norfolk, Va. 



.- Fredericksburg, Va. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

- Roanoke , Va. 

,- - Falmouth, Va. 

Warren ton, Va. 

Clifton Forge, Va. 

Steven's Point, Wis. 

......Atlanta, Ga. 



Fadeley, Ann Rice- 
Fang, Therese.. 



Farinholt, Martha Palen.. 

Farmer, Phyllis Mae....- 

Ferrell, Margie Ann 

Fletcher, Margaret Ann 

Flippo, Peggy Pratt 

Foley, Patricia Ann.... 



Forsyth, Gwen Marilyn 

Fox, Betty England 

Fraughnaugh, Kate Louise.. 
Frazier, Shirley Mae.. 



Washington, D. C. 

— Washington, D. C. 

- Newport News, Va. 

- — . Richmond , Va. 

.._ -Kinston, N. C. 

..Richville Centre, N. Y. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

— Danville, Va. 

Abington, Pa. 

Capron, Va. 

..Sparta, Va. 



Freeman, George Cephas, Jr 

Freeman, Sue Ann 



Garner, George William. 

Gayle, Frances O'Hair 

Gilley, Sarah Geraldine..., 

Gooding, Betty Ann 

Green, Shirley Ann.. 



—Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

....Fredericksburg, Va. 



.„ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.— Jacksonville, Fla. 

- Arlington, Va. 



Gregory, David Edward 

Gregory, Lois 

Gump, Mary Louise 

Gwathmey, Mildred Ellis.. 

Haines, Ruth Ann 



-Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

-St. Albans, W. Va. 

— Beulahville, Va. 



Hall, Margaret Elizabeth. 

Hamm, Billie Jean 

Hamman, Louise B 

Haney, Glenroy Monroe- 

Hanscom, Marvel B 

Hanzel, Francis J. 



Haralson, Barbara Anne.. 



Falls Church, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Montvale, Va. 

Fredericksb urg, Va . 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

_- —Manassas, Va. 

.- Johns town , Pa . 

— -. — Sylacauga, Ala. 



172 



Mary Washington College 



Harder, Lois Maybelle. 

Harrison, Richard « 

Harvey, Ruth C 



Harvill, Lola Spitzer 

Hatcher, Gladys Bernard.. 

Hearn, Charles Mason..- — 

Hedrick, Shirley Ann 

Hicks, Joan Elizabeth 

Hill, Wendell Shelton 

Hirschmann, Aileen Louise.. 
Holcomb, Herman Perry— 
Hollifield, June Shirley.. 

Horst, Joanne Helen 

Hudson, Louise Gill 

Huff, Barbara Sue 



Hunt, Norman F 

Imer, Donna Mildred.- 

Irvin, Florence Elizabeth.. 
Ives, Patricia Anne 



Jackson, Rosemary Westerfield.. 
James, Vivian Janice- 



Jennings, Margaret Carroll, 

Johnson, Barbara Ann 

Johnson, Edmund Ravene— 

Johnson, Virginia Frances 

Johnston, Lucile Moore 

Jones, Marion Jayne 

Jordan, Betty Pell. 



Jose, Regalado San Luis-. 
Justis, Willie Marshall 

Kerrick, Patricia Harford. 
Kerrins, Joan Marie.. 



Kimball, Beverly Jean™ 
Kirtley, Elizabeth Lee- 
Kleinknecht, Joan Elizabeth. 
Kreutz, Bette Ann 



Lacy, Mary Jo 

Lambert, Frances Rowe 

Landefeld, Jacqueline Anne — 

Lee, Ann Fairfax 

Lee, Frances C— 



Liebert, Henry Siegfried 

Lightner, Jacqueline Christine- 
Lindstrom, John Townsend — 
Linn, Roberta Mae — 
Livesay, Anne CaroL 

Lovelace, Ann 

Lucy, Bessie Mae 

Lund, Jane Ann 



MacGregor, Kathy Cole 

Martin, Catherine Walker- 
Martin, Emma Jester- 



Mask, Sarah Harriett 

Mason, Elizabeth Ann 

Matheny, Hugh Wood 



Fredericksburg, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

New Hope, Va. 

Four Oaks, N. C. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Falmouth, Va. 

Port Royal, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 

.- — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Bowling Green, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

— Colonial Beach, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

-Williamsport, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Falmouth, Va. 

Malverne, N. Y. 

— Fredericksburg, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

-.Norfolk, Va. 

Columbus, Ga. 

Norfolk, Va. 

... Portsmouth, Va. 

—.Baltimore, Md. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 

— Colonial Heights, Va. 

..College Park, Md. 

-Bridgeport, Conn. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Martinville, Va. 

Milford, Va. 

-Levittown, N. Y. 

The Plains, Va. 

Jamaica, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

-Fredericksburg, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 

.Landisburg, Pa. 

.- —Richmond, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Victoria, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Nassawadoy, Va. 

-Columbus, Ga. 

Roanoke, Va. 

-.Norfolk, Va. 



Register of Students 



173 



Maxwell, Charlotte Rita. 
McLanahan, Clara Jean..., 

McNutt, Peggy Baker 

McRae, Ruby Lee — . 

Mears, Leah Ray 

Miller, Peggy Anne.. 



.._ Bedford, Va. 

Elberton, Ga. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 
..Fredericksburg, Va. 
- ...Norfolk, Va. 



Moffett, Betty Stuart 

Moody, Edith Mae 

Moors, Elizabeth Wever. 
Morris, Helen Jane.. 



Moss, Ruth Elizabeth- 

Mothershead, Betty Lee 

Murphy, William Tayloe, Jr.. 

Nebel, Jane Anne.. 



Nolte, June Carpenter 

Olton, Robert Matthew— 
Osborne, David Franklin. 
Overstreet, Nancy Miller- 
Pales, Edward Julius... — , 

Parmelee, Nancy Ruth 

Patrick, Beverly Ruth -.. 

Patton, Patricia Lee 

Payne, Betty Alice 

Pershing, Joan Marie 

Petro, Annastasia— 

Phillips, Barbara Jean 

Phillips, Nancy Lou 

Poarch, Nancy Ann 

Post, Charles- - - 



Norfolk, Va. 

Warrenton, Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Woodstock, Va. 

Williarasport, Pa. 

.„ -Newport News, Va. 

Downings, Va. 

— Warsaw, Va. 



.Marion Station, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 



Richmond, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 
Bedford, Va. 



...Fredericksburg, Va. 

Windsor, Conn. 

.Billings, N. Y. 



Prasse, John Herman 

Puryear, Mary Anderson., 



Quattlebaum, Gladys Lankford. 

Rawlette, Mildred Vaughen 

Rearden, Helen Henrietta 

Renn, Doris Anne ~ 



Kecoughtan, Va. 

-Shiloh, Va. 

-Fredericksburg, Va. 
-Morristown, Tenn. 

Pineville, W. Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Lawrenceville, Va. 

-.-...New York, N. Y. 
.-.Fredericksburg, Va. 
-.Boydton, Va. 

-....Norfolk, Va. 



Resch, Ann Virginia — 

Resch, Jacqueline Baker 

Roberts, Wingfield - 

Roberts, Mary Willoughby., 

Roller, Betty Frances.— -, 

Rowe, Diana Bailey — 

Russell, Ruth Allene G -. 



.Colonial Beach, Va. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

.Hopewell, Va. 



Sale, Joan Elizabeth 

Sanders, Beatrice Dameron., 
Sammons, Bobie Jean. 



Saunders, Theresa Marie 

Schein, Linda 

Schenkman, Peter Quarles... 
Schuler, Thomas McKinley.. 
Scott, Dorothy Virginia. 



....Fredericksburg, Va. 
-White Plains, N. Y. 

— Richmond, Va. 

- Alexandria, Va. 

-...Charleston, W. Va. 
...-Fredericksburg, Va. 
Goby, Va. 

-.-..Bedford, Va. 

.- Kinsale, Va. 

. Princeton, W. Va. 

— Warsaw, Va. 



.Washington, D. C. 

.- Norfolk, Va. 

Stafford, Va. 



Scott, Jewell Lockhart 

Sease, Virginia Carroll 

Serrano, Luz Iris.„ 

Settle, Ella Blake.- — —... 



Shiloh, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

— Drexel Hill, Pa. 

.Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 
Berea, Va. 



174 



Mary Washington College 



Sheppe, Nancy Carolyn Fredericksburg, Va. 

Shoemaker, Mary Catherine — Downers Grove, 111. 

Shonerd, Robin Fentress Coral Gables, Fla. 

Singer, Frances M Falmouth, Va. 



Skinner, Evelyn Marie 

Smi th , Amy — - 

Smith, Audrey B — 

Smith, Barbara Dean 

Smith, Dolores Ellen „.- 

Snellings, Petty Anne — 

Spindle, Grace Dryden 

Staylor, Betty Joan 

Steck, Mary McCloy..- — 

Steele, Doris Virginia 

Story, Joyce Geraldine—. 
Strickler, Gladys Prause.. 

Strickler, Mable Ann 

Sullivan, Nancy Wright.. 
Summerson, Archer- 



Taylor, Margaret Rose 

Thomas, Anne Marie 

Thomas, Benjamin Stephen™ 

Thomas, Charlotte Lacy 

Thomas, Mary Steck.._ - 

Thomason, Virginia Ann 

Thompson, Elizabeth Jane..... 

Titus, Barbara Gay 

Tompkins, Sarah Havens 

Toney, Karen Osborne.. 



.-Hammonton, N. J. 
.Fredericksburg, Va. 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Minden, La. 

Baltimore, Md. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 
Hustle, Va. 



Chuckatuck, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 
.....Washington, D. C. 

Brock Road, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 
..Fredericksburg, Va. 
..Fredericksburg, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 



Travis, Thurley Evalena— „.... 

Vaughan, Elwood Douglas, Jr. 
Verling, Lois Jean.. 



Voronovsky, Irene Theodora- 



Warner, Nancy Carol. 

Warren, Alice Davis 

Watson, Inez Frye.~ 



Augusta, Ky. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

.Westfield, Mass. 

- —Oak Park, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.New York City, N. Y. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

.......Fredericksburg, Va. 

„.Cape Charles, Va. 

Salem, Va. 

..Orange, Va. 



Weaver, Katherine Wyvonne- 

Webb, Charles S 

Welsh, John Dickinson 

White, Charlotte Virginia — 

William, Mary Ann 

Wilson, Nancy Elm „. 

Wood, Josephine.. 



Woodson, Elizabeth Franklin., 

Worrell, Barbara Gray 

Wozniak, Florence Ann 

Wright, Barbara Jeane 

Wright, Nancy Lee.. 



—Schenectady, N. Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Radford, Va. 

King George, Va. 

Culpeper, Va. 

.Bowling Green, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

-.Callos, Va. 

Columbus, Ga. 

Ridgeway, Va. 

.„ Dillon, S. C. 

Richmond, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Moscow, Penn. 



Wright, Ruth Broaddus 

Wright, Warren Robert 

Wykle, Arline Vaughan 



Young, Charles Edward- 
Young, Joan Frances.. 



..Fredericksburg, Va. 
.Fredericksburg, Va. 

_.„ Alps , Va. 

Bristow, Va. 



Young, Luly Catherine 

Zirkle,, Virginia Marie 



..Fredericksburg, Va. 

.Fredericksburg, Va. 

..Fredericksburg, Va. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 

..Colonial Beach, Va. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 
BY STATES AND COUNTRIES 

1952-53 

Virginia 986 

New York 77 

Maryland 56 

Pennsylvania 52 

New Jersey 51 

West Virginia - 35 

District of Columbia 32 

Florida - 29 

Connecticut 27 

Massachusetts 26 

North Carolina 22 

Georgia 16 

South Carolina 16 

Alabama 15 

Tennessee 13 

Kentucky 11 

Ohio 8 

Illinois 7 

California 6 

Rhode Island 5 

Louisiana 5 

New Hampshire 4 

Texas 4 

New Mexico 3 

Vermont 3 

Maine 2 

Mississippi „ _.. 2 

Missouri 2 

Colorado 

Delaware 

Kansas '. „ 

Montana 

Oklahoma 

Washington _ „ 

Wisconsin 

Puerto Rico 7 

Canal Zone 2 

Venezuela „ 2 

Canada 

France 

Greece 

Japan 

Saudi Arabia 

Turkey „ 

Uruguay „ „ _ „ 

Total First Semester 1,544 



and 
CampuS Activities 



s _ ^.^^H 









George Washington Hall— Administration Buil 



DING 



- '■ 






Kim 




Pll 






HI 



1 



lis 



'*<>♦*«*• 



list' 






.i. *, *. 



*- 



^ * *Srf^ 






i: ' 



6 



■. . 







3& Wi 

§|PL I ..|| ™T*' ■*■■ ■"■ ■'*: 



i * 



T 



Mjf, CTgt 




':* #t 




Chandler Hall— Science Building 



4_ 




Corinthian Columns Facade Seacobegk— Dining Hall Building 




ShX-M | 












Hi 



iiliW 



Mi 



. Itf* 



■ f 



I 

IE 



\mwmmm 



£... & 



I 



v 



*# . 



-AIL. 



I fipiil^ JII 






,;. I: ,;"fj 






•■•5.«j*i"-.fS 



»*£, * 



■ " ^ 















mm 

ill 



V* 






* 






#1 



3- 



■ liJ ' 





.sjiiiiHifp- 



I 
ts< * 



4 ft 



1. 




■PI 
■■1 



|p|^^^^M|; : ;;:: 



... y - 



■ill 

iir 






,;^p?p«- 



shhh 






%^ v. 



r*-v 



'^■n 



,»s 



CJSfet 






M' '»;liW 







WHI 



I1MHHHI 



'■1 



mm 



111 



w „,„^ wm __ „._„„,.,, .. „ : ,,, !? , 3 « * JSHHHHI 



■ 



■f^H 



■I 



■■t 



■■■I 






■Hi 



Itllliw 






HH 






v " v i , 



m 



■■■-?■• / 



4rp> 



wmm*m m 










Mary Ball Hall— Dormitory 




Wmmm 




< 
W 

X 

h 

w 

fa 

O 

O 

H 
U 

w 

w 

o 
< 

H 

c^ 

fa 

O 

< 




z 

U 

c/3 
H 
I* 

< 

z 





fif^; 



: --:m. 



m 



*■■:.*£ 






|; 





Instruction In Almost Every Type of Musical Instrument 
is Offered at Mary Washington 




o 
w 
hJ 

o 

U 



IBS* ^ 



«««|fe:%--> 






|^* %, >f^^;*^r^^l > 



f^^^KwiS&M 






»<: : 




" 



»i 



,,,- 



'lialiil 



■Sip; 



r ,9 ll 






%l ......" ^ 



^ 
"""' 



jaiiiiil 




eiilii* 1 









l«rl jr 




The Virginia Climate and Scenery Add to the 
Enjoyment of the Bridle Trail 




At the Stables 




Home of Mary, the Mother of George Washington, located just off the Campus 





Students at Kenmore Hall 

The Home of Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of General George Washington 
Located almost under the shadow of the College and in full view of the Campus. 



'■-m 






m ^H 




■ 

1 






■ 



■ 



^b 



•J*-; 






■ 



« 






m